IMDb > Gregory Peck > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000 | 1991

1-20 of 29 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


The Omen TV show moves from Lifetime to A&E

1 May 2015 11:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Deadline is reporting that the new TV show based on the classic horror film The Omen, entitled Damien, is set to change from Lifetime to A&E.

The straight-to-series drama is set to be a direct follow-up to the original The Omen, which was directed by Richard Donner (Superman) and starred Gregory Peck. The show had been set-up at Lifetime, but with the move to A&E, the series has gone from a 6-episode run to a 10-episode run.

Damien “follows the adult life of Damien Thorn (Bradley James), the mysterious child from the 1976 motion picture who has grown up seemingly unaware of the satanic forces around him.”

A&E are hoping the show will follow the success of their other classic-horror-remake Bates Motel, which is expected to be renewed for a fourth season very soon.

»

- Scott J. Davis

Permalink | Report a problem


Pitt Former TV Co-Star Kallsen Dead at 48, Emmy Nominee Meadows dead at 95, Oscar nominee Mankiewicz dead at 93

30 April 2015 9:25 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Brad Pitt 'Glory Days' costar Nicholas Kallsen Brad Pitt 'Glory Days' costar Nicholas Kallsen dead at 48 Nicholas Kallsen, who was featured opposite Brad Pitt in the short-lived television series Glory Days, has died at age 48 in Thailand according to online reports. Their source is one of Rupert Murdoch's rags, citing a Facebook posting by one of the actor's friends. The cause of death was purportedly – no specific source was provided – a drug overdose.* Aired on Fox in July 1990, Glory Days told the story of four high-school friends whose paths take different directions after graduation. Besides Nicholas Kallsen and Brad Pitt, the show also featured Spike Alexander and Evan Mirand. Glory Days lasted a mere six episodes – two of which directed by former Happy Days actor Anson Williams – before its cancellation. Roommates Nicholas Kallsen and Brad Pitt vying for same 'Thelma & Louise' role? The Murdoch tabloid also »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Time Machine: Veterans Wallach and Coppola - Godfather 3 in Common - Are Special Oscar Honorees

24 April 2015 12:28 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson on the Oscars' Red Carpet Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson at the Academy Awards Eli Wallach and wife Anne Jackson are seen above arriving at the 2011 Academy Awards ceremony, held on Sunday, Feb. 27, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The 95-year-old Wallach had received an Honorary Oscar at the Governors Awards in November 2010. See also: "Doris Day Inexplicably Snubbed by Academy," "Maureen O'Hara Honorary Oscar," "Honorary Oscars: Mary Pickford, Greta Garbo Among Rare Women Recipients," and "Hayao Miyazaki Getting Honorary Oscar." Delayed film debut The Actors Studio-trained Eli Wallach was to have made his film debut in Fred Zinnemann's Academy Award-winning 1953 blockbuster From Here to Eternity. Ultimately, however, Frank Sinatra – then a has-been following a string of box office duds – was cast for a pittance, getting beaten to a pulp by a pre-stardom Ernest Borgnine. For his bloodied efforts, Sinatra went on »

- D. Zhea

Permalink | Report a problem


Richard Corliss, Venerable Time Film Critic, Dies at 71

24 April 2015 8:34 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Richard Corliss, for 35 years the witty, incisive and compassionate voice on film and culture at Time magazine, died Thursday after a stroke, the magazine announced Friday.

Time editor Nancy Gibbs messaged her staff with the news, expressing her “great sorrow” at the death of a man who she said “had to write, like the rest of us breathe and eat and sleep.”

“It’s not clear that Richard ever slept, for the sheer expanse of his knowledge and writing defies the normal contours of professional life,” Gibbs added.

Corliss, 71, suffered the stroke a week earlier, according to an obituary on Time’s website. He died in New York City and his magazine declared that it, “along with all lovers of film and great critical writing, will have a hard time recovering.”

The critic reviewed films tirelessly—more than 1,000 of them, while also authoring four books and writing sweeping narratives on »

- James Rainey

Permalink | Report a problem


A Brief (Pun Intended) History of Lawyers in the Movies

13 April 2015 2:25 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933’s Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies.

1. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

Gregory Peck’s Atticus Finch became the boilerplate for the Noble Movie Lawyer in this iconic, 1962 adaptation of Harper Lee’s award-winning novel. Atticus Finch, a small town attorney in the Depression-era South, must defend a black man (Brock Peters) falsely accused of raping a white woman, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

Permalink | Report a problem


Mystery Science Theater 3000 Xxiii Review

12 April 2015 1:40 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Brad Cook reviews Mystery Science Theater 3000 Xxiii…

When I wrote for Film Threat, I reviewed every Mystery Science Theater 3000 DVD set released by Shout! Factory, so I was happy to bring my reviews to Flickering Myth and continue the streak. I’ve been a fan of the show since I discovered it in college, back around 1990 or 1991, when finding a blank videotape and programming a Vcr was a real pain in the ass. In those days, if you really liked a show, you made sure you were in front of the TV at the appointed day and time.

I never joined MST3K’s “keep circulating the tapes” movement, which exhorted fans to record episodes and pass the videotapes around. That concept, along with fanzines and play-by-mail chess, seems so quaint today, although the last several years of the show’s run coincided with the rise of the Internet, »

- Gary Collinson

Permalink | Report a problem


Is Blade Runner really that great? Debating its masterpiece status

3 April 2015 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

When Blade Runner (1982) first arrived from Hollywood's outermost off-worlds, nobody knew quite what to make of it. After all, here was a sci-fi blockbuster with no action, a romance leeched of all feeling, a Harrison Ford flick where the newly-behatted Indiana Jones grumped around the near-future getting beaten up by girls.

Director Ridley Scott, it's fair to say, didn't quite know what to make of it either, adding (then removing) a studio-mandated voiceover and happy ending, and gradually teasing out a twist not present in any of screenwriters Hampton Fancher and David Webb Peoples' separate drafts. It's not often a director gets to sculpt his work after it hits theatres, but the last of his seven versions, The Final Cut (2007), is re-released this month.

As the film has changed, so too has its critical standing, with history anointing it a masterpiece, and ignoring the mess from which it emerged. »

Permalink | Report a problem


21 mainly forgotten Us number 1 movies from the 1990s

31 March 2015 8:24 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The 1990s: a time when Sleepwalkers, Burt Reynolds, No Escape, Chevy Chase and F/X/2 could top the Us box office...

By the 1990s, studios were waking up to movie marketing, and the era of the blockbuster. Tim Burton's Batman, released in summer 1989, had introduced the idea of a big opening weekend, and modern movies now target their promotional work to get just that. As such, it's harder and harder for smaller films to snare the top slot at the Us box office, even for one weekend.

In the 1990s, particularly the first half of the 1990s, that wasn't so much the case though. In fact, many films that have long since fallen from the public conscious topped the chart. And in this piece, I've tried to capture some of them.

Inevitably, you're going to have heard of some of them, and what a UK dweller sees as a »

- simonbrew

Permalink | Report a problem


68th Festival de Cannes Poster Features Ingrid Bergman

23 March 2015 8:30 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

© Fdc / Lagency / Taste (Paris) / Ingrid Bergman © David Seymour / Estate of David Seymour – Magnum Photos

Hollywood star Ingrid Bergman is featured on the official poster of the 68th Festival de Cannes

Bergman was a modern icon, an emancipated woman, an intrepid actress, and a figurehead for the new realism. She changed roles and adoptive countries as the mood took her, but never lost sight of her quintessential grace and simplicity.

This year’s poster captures the actress, who worked with Alfred Hitchcock, Roberto Rossellini and Ingmar Bergman, and starred opposite Cary Grant, Humphrey Bogart and Gregory Peck, in all her beauty, her face lit up by a calm serenity that seems to herald a promising future.

Liberty, audacity, modernity – values also shared by the Festival, year after year, through the artists and films it showcases. Ingrid Bergman was President of the Jury in 1973.

“My family and I are deeply moved that »

- Michelle McCue

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Unveils Official Poster Featuring Ingrid Bergman

23 March 2015 11:06 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris — The 68th edition of the Cannes Film Festival will pay tribute to Hollywood Golden Age actress Ingrid Bergman with this year’s poster.

The fest describes Bergman — who worked with directors Alfred Hitchcock, Roberto Rossellini and Ingmar Bergman, and starred opposite Cary Grant, Humphrey Bogart and Gregory Peck — as a “modern icon, an emancipated woman, an intrepid actress, and a figurehead for the new realism.”

The actress served as president of the fest’s jury in 1973. “(Bergman) changed roles and adoptive countries as the mood took her, but never lost sight of her quintessential grace and simplicity,” said the festival, adding that she embodies the values of “Liberty, audacity, modernity” that are shared by Cannes.

“My family and I are deeply moved that the Festival de Cannes has chosen to feature our magnificent mother on the official poster to mark the centenary of her birth,” said Isabella Rossellini. “Her »

- Elsa Keslassy

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: 'Justified' - 'Burned': Pizza party!

17 March 2015 8:00 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

A review of tonight's "Justified" coming up just as soon as I call the soft rock militia on you... In one way, you could look at "Burned" as a filler episode, since very little happens to change the larger story arcs. Boyd doesn't get his hands on Markham's cash, and thus Raylan doesn't get to arrest him, but both men intend to keep trying. Ava discovers that Raylan is wise to her, but figures out a way to remain out of jail for now by giving him the real details of the heist. Zachariah tries to murder Boyd for what the Crowder family has done to Ava, but Carl saves his boss at the last minute. Raylan doesn't even manage to successfully sell Arlo's house to Loretta, since her overt pitch to the town to become part of her budding pot empire would get him trouble with the higher-ups. With »

- Alan Sepinwall

Permalink | Report a problem


Wright and Goldwyn Have an Ugly Parting of the Ways; Brando (More or Less) Comes to the Rescue

11 March 2015 2:07 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright-Samuel Goldwyn association comes to a nasty end (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Film.") Whether or not because she was aware that Enchantment wasn't going to be the hit she needed – or perhaps some other disagreement with Samuel Goldwyn or personal issue with husband Niven BuschTeresa Wright, claiming illness, refused to go to New York City to promote the film. (Top image: Teresa Wright in a publicity shot for The Men.) Goldwyn had previously announced that Wright, whose contract still had another four and half years to run, was to star in a film version of J.D. Salinger's 1948 short story "Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut." Instead, he unceremoniously – and quite publicly – fired her.[1] The Goldwyn organization issued a statement, explaining that besides refusing the assignment to travel to New York to help generate pre-opening publicity for Enchantment, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Wright Minibio Pt.2: Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Movie

6 March 2015 8:28 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock heroine (image: Joseph Cotten about to strangle Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt') (See preceding article: "Teresa Wright Movies: Actress Made Oscar History.") After scoring with The Little Foxes, Mrs. Miniver, and The Pride of the Yankees, Teresa Wright was loaned to Universal – once initial choices Joan Fontaine and Olivia de Havilland became unavailable – to play the small-town heroine in Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt. (Check out video below: Teresa Wright reminiscing about the making of Shadow of a Doubt.) Co-written by Thornton Wilder, whose Our Town had provided Wright with her first chance on Broadway and who had suggested her to Hitchcock; Meet Me in St. Louis and Junior Miss author Sally Benson; and Hitchcock's wife, Alma Reville, Shadow of a Doubt was based on "Uncle Charlie," a story outline by Gordon McDonell – itself based on actual events. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Follow My Lead: Top Ten Mentors in the Movies

6 March 2015 8:00 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

We all would like to believe that we have that someone special to look up to for guidance and direction. From time to time we practice the art of worship for the mentor that appears larger than life to us. Whether our designated mentors that we choose to follow are inspirational or insidious it does not matter because that yearning to follow in their footsteps are so great that we blindly give anything to replicate that original blueprint.

Maybe if one dreams of being a famous astronaut you designate Neii Armstrong or John Glenn as your mentoring heroes? Perhaps your foray into film criticism was ignited by Judith Crist, Vincent Canby or Siskel & Ebert? How about emulating your favorite actor or singer and following their paths to success?

In Follow My Lead: Top Ten Mentors in the Movies we will look at some movie characters that served as  mentors to »

- Frank Ochieng

Permalink | Report a problem


Starmaker Allégret: From Gay Romance with 'Uncle' (and Nobel Winner) Gide to Simon's Movie Mentor

27 February 2015 9:46 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Marc Allégret: From André Gide lover to Simone Simon mentor (photo: Marc Allégret) (See previous post: "Simone Simon Remembered: Sex Kitten and Femme Fatale.") Simone Simon became a film star following the international critical and financial success of the 1934 romantic drama Lac aux Dames, directed by her self-appointed mentor – and alleged lover – Marc Allégret.[1] The son of an evangelical missionary, Marc Allégret (born on December 22, 1900, in Basel, Switzerland) was to have become a lawyer. At age 16, his life took a different path as a result of his romantic involvement – and elopement to London – with his mentor and later "adoptive uncle" André Gide (1947 Nobel Prize winner in Literature), more than 30 years his senior and married to Madeleine Rondeaux for more than two decades. In various forms – including a threesome with painter Théo Van Rysselberghe's daughter Elisabeth – the Allégret-Gide relationship remained steady until the late '20s and their trip to »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Creature Feature: Top Ten Animals Gone Bad in the Movies

23 February 2015 10:07 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The human condition. It is a tricky and complicated concept for us mortals to grasp in terms of our ugly, unpredictable behaviors. However, when one applies a revealing spotlight on the animal kingdom and takes a look at their on-screen aggression against humans it becomes a whole new ballgame. Occasionally, the source of frustration embedded in these wayward creatures is often times triggered by the psychological prompting of the bad seed humans responsible for their behavioral tirade against nature and man.

In Creature Feature: Top Ten Animals Gone Bad in the Movies we will look at the bombastic beasts gone ballistic in cinematic society. Maybe you have your own selections of haywire critters out to cause random havoc? If so then they probably would suffice within the theme of this movie column when detailing the animals that run amok on land, by sea or in the air.

The selections for »

- Frank Ochieng

Permalink | Report a problem


10 Things You Didn’t Know About Audrey Hepburn

21 February 2015 7:26 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

AP/AP

Every now and then, Hollywood is graced with a truly standout individual who, for whatever mixture of reasons, stands head and shoulders above the rest. They are the enduring icons, and the ones who remains classics of the silver screen even decades after their departure.

No other actress fits the role more definitively than Audrey Hepburn. Despite her diminutive stature, she made an enormous impact on the film industry from the outset, receiving equal billing alongside already established star Gregory Peck in her first starring role in Roman Holiday. For an actress who wasn’t even first choice for the role, it was a hell of an entrance to make.

But even though she may be renowned for genre-defining roles like socialite call-girl Holly Golightly and Cockney flower seller Eliza Doolittle, there remains far more to her character than what is seen on screen. A humanitarian, artist and dancer, »

- Alex Porritt

Permalink | Report a problem


Julianne Moore Could Be 11th Actor With Five or More Acting Noms Before First Oscar Win

18 February 2015 8:10 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor 

At Sunday’s Academy Awards ceremony, Julianne Moore could join the ranks of 10 actors and actresses who have had five or more acting nominations before their first win.

Moore earned her fifth nomination for her portrayal of a professor suffering from early-onset Alzheimer’s in Still Alice, based on Lisa Genova‘s 2007 novel of the same name. She was first nominated in 1998 for Paul Thomas Anderson’s Boogie Nights.

In Academy history, five actors and actresses have won their first Oscar on their fifth nomination.

Gregory Peck, who was first nominated in 1946 for The Keys of the Kingdom, didn’t win until 1962 for To Kill a Mockingbird. Five years later, Peck was awarded The Academy’s Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award.

Susan Hayward won her first and only Oscar in 1959 for her leading role in I Want to Live!. She was first nominated in 1948 for Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman. »

- Anjelica Oswald

Permalink | Report a problem


Louis Jourdan, Star of 'Gigi' and 'Octopussy,' Dies at 93

15 February 2015 1:05 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Louis Jourdan, the debonair leading man who romanced Leslie Caron in Gigi and played a wealthy Afghan prince in the James Bond film Octopussy, has died. He was 93. The French actor, who brought his smooth, continental charm to such films as Letters From an Unknown Woman (1948), The Happy Time (1952) and Three Coins in the Fountain (1954), died Saturday in his Beverly Hills home, according to French publication Le Point. After World War II, Jourdan attracted the attention of famed producer David O. Selznick and was cast in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Paradine Case (1947), which starred Gregory Peck and

read more

»

- Duane Byrge

Permalink | Report a problem


Newsmakers and Media Shakers: Top Ten Reporters in the Movies

14 February 2015 6:45 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

For the sake of this particular movie column let’s just consider the media types of news personalities, journalists and reporters as interchangeable. With that in mind Newsmakers and Media Shakers: Top Ten Reporters in the Movies will look at some of cinema’s top inquirers in the name of getting down to the nitty-gritty in bringing the truth to the forefront.

The movies have intensely, if not sometimes comically, showcased those characters that felt justified in reporting their newsworthy findings in the name of riveting entertainment. Whether spotlighting real-life newsmaker and shakers such as legendary luminaries in Edward R. Murrow to Watergate busters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein or profiling parodies of probing journalists as Natural Born Killer’s Wayne Gale it has been a trippy ride in witnessing cinematic reporters and their excitable exploits.

Perhaps Newmakers and Media Shakers: Top Ten Reporters in the Movies will be irresponsibly »

- Frank Ochieng

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000 | 1991

1-20 of 29 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners