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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 40 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘Certain Women,’ ‘The Piano Teacher,’ and More Join The Criterion Collection in September

16 June 2017 4:27 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

While the vast majority of our favorite films of last year have been treated with Blu-ray releases, one title near the top of the list we’ve been waiting the longest for is Kelly Reichardt‘s Certain Women. It looks like it’s been worth the wait as The Criterion Collection have unveiled their September releases and it’s leading the pack (with special features also an interview with the director and Todd Haynes!).

Also getting a release in September, is Michael Haneke‘s Isabelle Huppert-led The Piano Teacher and the recent documentary David Lynch: The Art Life (arriving perfectly-timed to the end of the new Twin Peaks). There’s also Alfred Hitchcock‘s classic psychodrama Rebecca and the concert film Festival, featuring Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Johnny Cash, and many more.

Check out the high-resolution cover art and full details on the releases below, with more on Criterion’s site. »

- Jordan Raup

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Criterion Collection Announces September 2017 Titles, Including ‘Certain Women’ and ‘Rebecca’

16 June 2017 3:09 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Five new movies are joining the Criterion Collection in September, two of which were released in the last year: Kelly Reichardt’s spare, moving “Certain Women” and the documentary “David Lynch: The Art Life.” Also getting the Criterion treatment are Michael Haneke’s “The Piancho Teacher,” starring Isabelle Huppert; “Rebecca,” Alfred Hitchcock’s adaptation of the Daphne du Maurier novel and his first American production; and Murray Lerner’s documentary “Festival,” which features performances by Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash, among others.

It isn’t Criterion’s most exciting month, but there’s still much to look forward to. Details below, including Criterion’s own descriptions:

Read More: Criterion Collection Announces August 2017 Additions, Including Restored ‘Sid & Nancy’ and Mike Leigh’s ‘Meantime

 

 

Rebecca

“Romance becomes psychodrama in Alfred Hitchcock’s elegantly crafted ‘Rebecca,’ his first foray into Hollywood filmmaking. A dreamlike adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s 1938 novel, the film »

- Michael Nordine

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17 Shakespeare Films Worth Watching

15 June 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

Though there’s nothing like seeing Shakespeare live on stage, the magic of cinema can bring new light to the Bard's classic works—and can allow us to view timeless performances over and over again. How many great Shakespearean performances have you seen at the movies? Here are 17 film versions of Shakespeare that all actors must watch. “Henry V” (1944, Sir Laurence Olivier)Partially funded by the British government following the devastation of World War II, this widely lauded film adaptation of a Globe Theatre production earned Olivier a special honorary Academy Award for his work as actor, producer, and director. “Hamlet” (1948, Sir Laurence Olivier)Olivier created another impactful turn with this acclaimed (if not perfectly faithful to the text) adaption of one of Shakespeare’s greatest works. Starring as the title role, Olivier carefully focused his directorial narrative on the characters’ psychological turmoil, removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern entirely. »

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Peter Sallis, Voice of Wallace in Wallace and Gromit, Passes Away at 96

5 June 2017 4:14 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Peter Sallis, who is best known for voicing Wallace in the animated Wallace and Gromit movies, has passed away at the age of 96. He died on Friday at his home in the U.K. and reportedly died peacefully. Peter Sallis' acting career lasted more than 60 years, with his first role dating back to 1947. He continued acting until 2010 before retiring from the business.

With more than 150 credits to his name, Peter Sallis was very prolific during his long career, but there are two roles for which he will always be remembered. One being Wallace, a role which he first took on in 1989 in the Wallace and Gromit short A Grand Day Out. He also played Norman Clegg on Summer Wine, the longest-running British sitcom in history. Per Deadline, his agents Jonathan Altaras Associates released this statement.

"It is with sadness that we announce that our client Peter Sallis died peacefully, »

- MovieWeb

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Exclusive: Why ‘Groundhog Day’ Star Andy Karl Won’t Let a Torn Acl Slow Him Down

31 May 2017 12:35 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

“I felt every emotion that I could possibly feel in the past four weeks,” Andy Karl tells Et by phone in May, about a week after it was announced he had been nominated for a Tony Award for his portrayal of Phil Connors in the adaptation of Groundhog Day, a musical based on the popular Bill Murray comedy. The actor, who has built a career starring in musical adaptations of iconic films (Saturday Night Fever, The Wedding SingerLegally Blonde and Rocky), was preparing for the Broadway debut of the production following a successful London run that earned him a Laurence Olivier Award when he inexplicably tore his Acl during a preview performance on April 14, just three days before the show’s official opening.

The dramatic moment -- halting the show as Karl sought medical attention -- happened during the second act. According to The New York Times, the visibly shaken actor eventually returned with a walking »

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JFK’s ‘Lost Inaugural Gala’: How Sinatra Created Showbiz’s Biggest Political Night (Listen)

27 May 2017 12:50 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The centennial of John F. Kennedy’s birth is on Monday, and to mark the occasion, PBS stations are presenting “JFK: The Lost Inaugural Gala.” The program is a one-hour documentary about the parade of showbiz A-listers who threw a big bash for the then-incoming President on Jan. 19, 1961.

There had been previous star-filled inaugural galas, but nothing quite like this one. Led by Frank Sinatra, the evening featured Nat King Cole, Laurence Olivier, Harry Belafonte, Ethel Merman, Jimmy Durante, Gene Kelly, Milton Berle, Janet Leigh, Tony Curtis, and Bette Davis.

NBC aired the telecast the following week, but the production ran into problems. The venue, the National Armory, was dark and cavernous, with so-so acoustics. That day, Washington was hit by a snowstorm, delaying the start of the ceremony by two hours. Merman showed up at rehearsal and couldn’t get back to her hotel to retrieve her evening gown. Instead »

- Ted Johnson

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Adam Driver Was A Bit Of A Grouch On The Set Of Star Wars: The Last Jedi

26 May 2017 2:37 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Kylo Ren is understandably a little miffed right now. Not only is he recovering from killing his dad, but he got beaten in a lightsaber duel by a complete beginner and the pride and joy of the First Order, Starkiller Base, was blown to smithereens. But, that doesn’t quite explain why Adam Driver sounds like he’s being a bit of a grouchy so and so on the set of Star Wars: The Last Jedi.

In an interview with Vanity Fair, Hamill explained that Driver is “very moody and intense,” adding:

“I remember saying to Adam, ‘I don’t know how you work, or your technique. But, at some point, you were my nephew. I probably bounced you on my knee. I probably babysat for you. There’s that side, and now we’re both estranged from the Skywalker family. All I’m suggesting is, if you’d like, »

- David James

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‘Paris Can Wait,’ Eleanor Coppola’s French Valentine, Leads Arthouse Box Office Openers

14 May 2017 10:24 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As specialized distributors head to Cannes, Eleanor Coppola’s French valentine “Paris Can Wait” (Sony Pictures Classics) scored with arthouse moviegoers. It’s only the fourth 2017 limited release to break the increasingly rare $20,000 per-theater-average mark.

These days, movies with older audience appeal are sustaining the market — and will likely form the core demo for similar available new films at Cannes. Eleanor Coppola (“Apocalypse Now” documentary “Heart of Darkness”) makes her narrative film debut at 81 with her semi-autobiographical first screenplay, starring Diane Lane as the wife of a self-involved film producer (Alec Baldwin).

New York also saw a handful of other small but still promising initial results, led by Cate Blanchett stunt-theater piece “Manifesto” (Film Rise), Israeli marriage story “The Wedding Plan” (Roadside Attractions) and “Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe” (First Run).

Netflix’s timely Tribeca documentary “Get Me Roger Stone,” an eye-opening portrait of Donald Trump’s flamboyant dark knight, »

- Tom Brueggemann

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'Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2': Why Marvel's Misfit-Filmmaker Gamble Works

8 May 2017 9:49 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Another weekend, another blockbuster Marvel opening at the box office. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, the latest episode in the company's cosmic-mercenaries saga, predictably crushed the competition, grossing an estimated $425 million globally and perpetuating the studio's multiplex dominance. If you're looking for a secret to the company's success, we'll direct you to a 2014 comment from GotG director James Gunn. "I made a decision early on that I wanted it to be a hundred percent a James Gunn movie and a hundred percent a Marvel movie," he said after the first film's release. »

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John Badham interview: Saturday Night Fever at 40

1 May 2017 2:17 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Don Kaye May 15, 2017

Director John Badman looks back at his disco classic four decades later...

Saturday Night Fever is the film that made John Travolta into a legitimate star, launched the Bee Gees to the pinnacle of pop success and introduced the world to the subculture, music and fashion of disco dancing - specifically the scene in the clubs of the insular blue collar Brooklyn neighbourhood of Bay Ridge. The movie made the scene and music into a national phenomenon that lasted several years, until the disco craze petered out in the early '80s.

See related  Better Call Saul season 3 episode 1 review: Mabel Better Call Saul season 2 episode 10 review: Klick Better Call Saul season 2 episode 9 review: Nailed Better Call Saul season 2 episode 8 review: Fifi

The whole thing was based on a New York magazine article called 'Tribal Rites Of The New Saturday Night', written by a British journalist named »

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Ophélia

25 April 2017 1:19 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

New Wave director Claude Chabrol goes off in an odd direction with this Francophone adaptation of Hamlet. Convinced that his father was murdered, the heir to an estate behaves like a madman as he sets out to unmask the killers. The ‘castle’ is a country manse guarded by thugs as a precaution against the signeur’s striking union workers. Special added attraction: the stars to see are Alida Valli and Juliette Mayniel of Eyes without a Face.

Ophélia

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1963 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 104 min. / Street Date April 25, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95

Starring: Alida Valli, Juliette Mayniel, Claude Cerval, André Jocelyn, Robert Burnier, Jean-Louis Maury, Sacha Briquet, Liliane Dreyfus (David), Pierre Vernier.

Cinematography: Jacques Rabier, Jean Rabier

Film Editor: Jacques Gaillard

Original Music: Pierre Jansen

Written by Claude Chabrol, Paul Gégauff, Martial Matthieu from a play by William Shakespeare

Produced and Directed by Claude Chabrol

 

I suppose »

- Glenn Erickson

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Peter O'Toole's Personal Archives Acquired by the University of Texas

21 April 2017 10:50 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The personal archives of Peter O'Toole, the late and legendary British star of Lawrence of Arabia and so many other memorable films and plays, have been acquired by the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

The veritable treasure trove contains O'Toole's correspondence with Laurence Olivier, Marlon Brando, Michael Caine, John Gielgud, Katharine Hepburn, Jeremy Irons, Paul Newman, Kevin Spacey and others; diaries, notebooks, and theater and film scripts; photos, both professional and personal; and audio recordings of O'Toole rehearsing lines and reciting poetry (those alone are surely worth the price of admission).

The collection, held in 55 »

- Mike Barnes

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Peter O’Toole Archive Acquired by University of Texas

21 April 2017 10:12 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin has acquired the archive of British theater and film actor Peter O’Toole.

O’Toole began his career as a theater actor in Britain and went on to receive eight Academy Award nominations for films including “Lawrence of Arabia,” “Goodbye, Mr. Chips,” “My Favorite Year,” and “Venus.” His 1962 role as the titular character in “Lawrence of Arabia” made him a household name. In 2002, O’Toole received an honorary Academy Award for his lifetime of work.

The archive contains several theater and film scripts, as well as O’Toole’s writings, including drafts and notes from his three memoirs, the last of which remains unfinished and unpublished since his death. Letters between O’Toole and other renowned members of the film and theater industries are also included, with correspondents like Marlon Brando, Katharine Hepburn, Michael Caine, Paul Newman, Dustin Hoffman, and Laurence Olivier among them. »

- Erin Nyren

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‘The Little Foxes’ Broadway Review: Laura Linney, Cynthia Nixon Mix Up the Greed and Innocence

19 April 2017 5:00 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

It takes real guts for two actors to alternate roles during the run of a play. Who needs such direct comparisons? Laurence Olivier and John Gielgud famously switched, playing the Bard’s Romeo and Mercutio in a 1935 U.K. production. Now on Broadway, Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon alternate playing Regina and Birdie in a revival of Lillian Hellman’s “The Little Foxes,” which opened Thursday at Mtc’s Samuel  J. Friedman Theatre. On opening night, Linney played Regina and Nixon played Birdie, and they are excellent in those respective roles. Less wonderful is Nixon’s Regina and Linney’s Birdie. »

- Robert Hofler

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Olivier Awards 2017 Conjure Record-Breaking 9 Wins for ‘Harry Potter’

10 April 2017 4:00 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

In a festive ceremony hosted by Jason Manford at the Royal Albert Hall, the 2017 Laurence Olivier Awards honored the best of London theater April 9. Shattering the record for most statues ever presented to a theatrical production was “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child,” which won nine accolades in total, including best new play. The West End hit (bound for Broadway in 2018) from J. K. Rowling, Jack Thorne, and director John Tiffany had been nominated in 11 categories, the most of any play in the awards’ history. Recognized in the title role was Jamie Parker, as well as supporting actors Noma Dumezweni and Anthony Boyle. In his acceptance speech for best director, Tiffany stressed the importance of arts funding and education. It was a theme presenters and honorees returned to throughout the evening; the child stars of “School of Rock The Musical,” winning the award for outstanding achievement in music, told children »

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Tim Pigott-Smith, ‘Jewel in the Crown’ Actor, Dies at 70

7 April 2017 12:39 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

British actor Tim Pigott-Smith, best known for his work as Ronald Merrick in ITV’s 1979 serial “The Jewel in the Crown,” died April 7. He was 70.

For his “Jewel in the Crown” role as a police superintendent during the last days of the British Raj in India, Pigott-Smith won a BAFTA for Best Actor in 1985. This year, Pigott-Smith received an OBE for his services to drama. He was also nominated in 2014-15 for Laurence Olivier and Tony Awards for his lead role in “King Charles III,” which was just filmed for a TV movie adaptation.

Pigott-Smith was set to play Willy Loman opposite his wife Pamela Miles in a touring production of Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman.” The play was set to open Apr. 10 at Northampton’s Royal and Derngate Theatre.

“Everyone at Royal and Derngate and all involved with the production of Death Of A Salesman are deeply saddened by this tragic news,” the »

- Erin Nyren

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Tim Pigott-Smith, ‘Jewel in the Crown’ Actor, Dies at 70

7 April 2017 12:39 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

British actor Tim Pigott-Smith, best known for his work as Ronald Merrick in ITV’s 1979 serial “The Jewel in the Crown,” died April 7. He was 70.

For his “Jewel in the Crown” role as a police superintendent during the last days of the British Raj in India, Pigott-Smith won a BAFTA for Best Actor in 1985. This year, Pigott-Smith received an OBE for his services to drama. He was also nominated in 2014-15 for Laurence Olivier and Tony Awards for his lead role in “King Charles III,” which was just filmed for a TV movie adaptation.

Pigott-Smith was set to play Willy Loman opposite his wife Pamela Miles in a touring production of Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman.” The play was set to open Apr. 10 at Northampton’s Royal and Derngate Theatre.

“Everyone at Royal and Derngate and all involved with the production of Death Of A Salesman are deeply saddened by this tragic news, »

- Erin Nyren

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Screen legends Morgan Freeman & Michael Caine on heist comedy Going in Style and why they’re still blowing bloody doors off

7 April 2017 7:43 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Stefan Pape

Here at HeyUGuys we are fortunate enough to spend time with many of our heroes from the silver screen – but this week presented a quite unforgettable opportunity, as we sat down with two of the greatest living actors, Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine.

In London to promote their latest picture, the heist comedy Going in Style, we discussed with the pair the role of the elderly in modern society, and exactly what it is that keeps luring them back to work. They speak about nerves, pensions, hobbies and movie choices – as we just sit down and listen as the pair reminisce on two quite remarkable careers. Plus, Caine reveals who he believes does the very best impression of him – and there’s a been a fair few.

Also be sure to catch our video interview below:

Morgan Freeman & Michael Caine Video Interview

Can you see the correlation between a heist and acting? »

- Stefan Pape

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Queen Elizabeth Honors Former Brother-in-Law Lord Snowdon at Memorial Service

7 April 2017 7:29 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Queen Elizabeth led a moving tribute for Lord Snowdon, the former husband of Princess Margaret, who died peacefully at his home in January at the age of 86.

Members of the royal family, including Prince Philip, Prince William and Prince Andrew, joined mourners for a memorial service on Friday at St. Margaret’s Church, Westminster Abbey in London.

The Queen, who wore a bright purple coat with black velvet trim, greeted Lord Snowdon’s family following the service. She gave his 14-year-old granddaughter, Lady Margarita Armstrong-Jones, a sweet kiss on the cheek as she left the church.

More than 600 people attended the service, »

- Erin Hill

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The Real Jesus of Nazareth: Smithsonian Goes Beyond the Franco Zeffirelli Miniseries

4 April 2017 2:43 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Smithsonian Channel has announced its new TV series, The Real Jesus of Nazareth will premiere on Easter Sunday, April 16th, at 8:00pm Et. The docu-series features Robert Powell, who played Jesus in Franco Zeffirelli's 1977 mini-series, Jesus of Nazareth. The original mini-series also starred Anne Bancroft, Ian McShane, Sir Laurence Olivier, and James Earl Jones.The Real Jesus of Nazareth follows Powell on this trip to the Holy Land to investigate the historical Jesus.Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

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