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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 28 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Blu-ray Review – Six Gothic Tales

15 December 2014 12:54 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Robert W Monk reviews Six Gothic Tales, a Blu-ray collection of the Roger Corman directed and produced adaptations of the Edgar Allen Poe stories The Fall of the House of Usher, The Pit and the Pendulum, Tales of Terror, The Raven, The Haunted Palace, The Tomb of Ligeia, starring Vincent Price, Barbara Steele, Peter Lorre, Boris Karloff, Lon Chaney Jr, Jack Nicholson and Basil Rathbone

Synopsis:

In The Fall of the House of Usher, a young man attempts to uncover the threat of a curse on his fiancée’s family. In Pit and the Pendulum, a brother investigates the untimely death of his sister, played by Barbara Steele. Tales of Terror adapts three Poe classics, Morella, The Black Cat and The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar, each starring a horror icon. The Raven is a slapstick comedy  about three rival magicians linked by Poe’s most famous poem. »

- Robert W Monk

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Kino Lorber Announces Tales of Terror & The Crimson Cult Blu-rays

8 December 2014 7:47 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Written by Richard Matheson, based on the stories of Edgar Allan Poe, directed by Roger Corman, and starring Vincent Price in all three of its segments, 1962’s Tales of Terror features legendary names of the horror genre, and Kino Lorber has announced they are releasing the star-studded fright film, along with 1968’s The Crimson Cult (starring Boris Karloff and Christopher Lee), on Blu-ray next year.

In April of 2015, Kino Lorber will release Tales of Terror on Blu-ray/DVD and The Crimson Cult on Blu-ray. No special features have been announced at this time, but we’ll keep Daily Dead readers updated on further announcements.

Tales of Terror is also now available in the UK from Arrow Films as part of their Roger Corman/Vincent Price home media release package, Six Gothic Tales.

Tales of Terror (1962, synopsis via Blu-ray.com):

“This triple treat of terror is a three-episode “blood-dripping package that includes murder, »

- Derek Anderson

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‘Vincent Price in Six Gothic Tales’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Video)

7 December 2014 11:04 AM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Christmas is almost here and Arrow Video have a present for horror fans (though you’ll have to buy it of course).  Vincent Price in Six Gothic Tales is a box set of the Roger Corman Edgar Allan Poe films starring not only Price but some of the most iconic horror actors.  Just mentioning the names Barbara Steele, Peter Lorre, Lon Chaney Jr., Boris Karloff and Basil Rathbone in the same review as Vincent Price should have you getting your money ready straight away…and let’s not forget a young Jack Nicholson making an appearance too.  All this movie history in just one box, and that’s before we even look at the special features included for each movie.

Roger Corman’s Poe movies are strange beasts though, normally taking only the name and basic plot they sometimes have little connecting them to the actual source material, yet as fans we love them anyway. »

- Paul Metcalf

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The 35 Greatest Murder Mystery Movies Ever Made

28 November 2014 7:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Murder mysteries are so commonplace on TV that each week offers seemingly dozens of them on police procedural series and detective shows. But in the movies, whodunits are surprisingly rare, and really good ones rarer still. There's really only a handful of movies that excel in offering the viewer the pleasure of solving the crime along with a charismatic sleuth, often with an all-star cast of suspects hamming it up as they try not to appear guilty.

One of the best was "Murder on the Orient Express," released 40 years ago this week, on November 24, 1974. Like many films adapted from Agatha Christie novels, this one featured an eccentric but meticulous investigator (in this case, Albert Finney as Belgian epicure Hercule Poirot), a glamorous and claustrophobic setting (here, the famous luxury train from Istanbul to Paris), and a tricky murder plot with an outrageous solution. The film won an Oscar for passenger »

- Gary Susman

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The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari | Blu-ray Review

25 November 2014 8:30 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Kino Classics refurbishes Robert Weine’s 1920 landmark title The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, the film that marked the birth of German Expressionism as well as the flagship of the horror film genre. Tempered by bookends meant to diminish interpretations of parallelism between insanity and authority, its stark, jagged angles and ingenious uses of shadows predates the dark beauty of film noir, featuring fantastic set designs that still rival the ability of contemporary film. Eerie, carnivalesque, and as arresting as ever, it’s a title worthy of this remastered revisit.

The story of Caligari, developed by Carl Mayer (responsible for Murnau’s Sunrise and The Last Laugh) and Hans Janowitz, is incredibly simple. Basically, the eponymous doctor happens to have control of a sleepwalker that does nefarious deeds for his master, namely murdering inhabitants of the small hamlet late at night. There is a slight twist to the proceedings, though it »

- Nicholas Bell

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Leeds International Film Festival 2014 Review – M (1931)

25 November 2014 2:38 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

M, 1931.

Directed by Fritz Lang.

Starring Peter Lorre, Otto Wernicke and Gustaf Gründgens.

Synopsis:

When the police in a German city are unable to catch a child-murderer, other criminals join in the manhunt.

Within Fritz Lang’s first film made in sound, 1931’s M, there’s fascinating evidence of the period’s – and, of course, the director’s – ongoing transition from silent cinema. It’s there in Peter Lorre’s hysterical performance as whistling child murderer Hans Beckert (the mania’s exacerbated by the fact Lorre was acting for Lang in the day while appearing onstage in a Valentine Katayev play at night). It’s there in the emphasis on the image, in those strong, German expressionism-afflicted visuals – Lang is here still telling much of his story with his camera, stalking through the paranoid Berlin streets after both killer and prey. It’s there, outstanding, in the grand set design, »

- Gary Collinson

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Six Gothic Tales Starring Vincent Price UK Blu-ray Release Details & Special Features

20 November 2014 9:04 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Scream Factory gave many classic horror film fans a Halloween treat with the release of The Vincent Price Collection II, and now Arrow Films is looking to sate the viewing appetites of Price fans in England with Six Gothic Tales, due out on December 8th. Comprised of six Roger Corman movies based on Edgar Allan Poe’s works and starring Vincent Price, Arrow Films has unveiled their collection’s special features:

Press Release - “From the Merchant of Menace, Vincent Price, and the King of the B’s, Roger Corman, come six Gothic tales inspired by the pen of Edgar Allan Poe. Arrow Video is thrilled to announce the limited edition release of this Six Gothic Tales box set. Limited to a run of just 2000 copies, this much-anticipated release will include The Fall of the House of Usher, Tales of Terror, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Raven, The Haunted Palace »

- Derek Anderson

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Norman Lloyd at 100: Hollywood’s Living Memory

7 November 2014 6:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The earliest surviving footage of broadcast television in America is a fragment of “The Streets of New York,” an adaptation of playwright Dion Boucicault’s 19th-century drama, aired by the experimental New York NBC affiliate W2XBS on August 31, 1939. All that now remains of the hour-long program is a silent, 11-minute kinescope, filmed off a TV screen and archived at the Paley Center For Media. And there, in those primitive flickering images, you can catch a glimpse of one of the show’s actors: the 24-year-old Norman Lloyd.

Next July, you can see the 99-year-old Lloyd in the Judd Apatow comedy “Trainwreck,” which shot on location in New York this summer and in which Lloyd plays, by his own admission, “a lecherous old man.” In between those unlikely bookends is a career that has quite literally spanned the 20th century and edged into the 21st, during which Lloyd has shared the stage, »

- Scott Foundas

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Top 100 Horror Movies: How Truly Horrific Are They?

31 October 2014 3:21 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Top 100 horror movies of all time: Chicago Film Critics' choices (photo: Sigourney Weaver and Alien creature show us that life is less horrific if you don't hold grudges) See previous post: A look at the Chicago Film Critics Association's Scariest Movies Ever Made. Below is the list of the Chicago Film Critics's Top 100 Horror Movies of All Time, including their directors and key cast members. Note: this list was first published in October 2006. (See also: Fay Wray, Lee Patrick, and Mary Philbin among the "Top Ten Scream Queens.") 1. Psycho (1960) Alfred Hitchcock; with Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin, Martin Balsam. 2. The Exorcist (1973) William Friedkin; with Ellen Burstyn, Linda Blair, Jason Miller, Max von Sydow (and the voice of Mercedes McCambridge). 3. Halloween (1978) John Carpenter; with Jamie Lee Curtis, Donald Pleasence, Tony Moran. 4. Alien (1979) Ridley Scott; with Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, John Hurt. 5. Night of the Living Dead (1968) George A. Romero; with Marilyn Eastman, »

- Andre Soares

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Lauren Bacall Lives! To Have And Have Not Saturday Morning at The Hi-Pointe

7 September 2014 7:20 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“You know you don’t have to act with me, Steve. You don’t have to say anything, and you don’t have to do anything. Not a thing. Oh, maybe just whistle. You know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve? You just put your lips together and… blow!”

If Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall (who died last month) occupy the same screen, you can safely expect fireworks! To Have And Have Not (1944) was Bacall’s debut performance, the movie that introduced both audiences and Bogart {he would marry her the following year} to one of cinema’s most iconic beauties and to her erotically husky voice. To Have And Have Not is an interesting mixture of war-time adventure and hard-boiled film-noir, set on the island of Martinique under the Vichy regime, and Bogart’s Harry “Steve” Morgan is forced to navigate swathes of low-lifes and immoral authority figures. »

- Tom Stockman

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Robin Williams in 'Aladdin': Animator Eric Goldberg remembers drawing Genie

12 August 2014 2:24 PM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Ed Sullivan. Jack Nicholson. Robert De Niro. Groucho Marx. Rodney Dangerfield. William F. Buckley. Peter Lorre. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Arsenio Hall.

Those were just some of the impressions that Robin Williams performed in the guise of the almighty blue Genie in Aladdin. Perhaps another comedian could’ve supplied similarly outrageous voices, but no one could’ve infused that dynamic, shape-shifting character with so much heart and humor. For many fans of a certain age, Genie was the Robin Williams character that immediately popped into their heads when the sad news broke yesterday that the Oscar-winning actor had died tragically in California »

- Jeff Labrecque

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Movie Review – M (1931)

10 August 2014 2:15 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

M, 1931.

Directed by Fritz Lang.

Starring Peter Lorre, Ellen Widmann, Inge Landgut and Otto Wernicke.

Synopsis:

A child-killer is on the loose. The police can’t seem to track him down and the crime gangs even take the matter into their hands. One man labels the murderer with the letter ‘M’ on his back using chalk, and slowly the culprit is found out…

In the media storm involving Rolf Harris and Jimmy Saville, it seems to be the relevant moment to rerelease the incredible thriller M. An unforgettable tale of a child-killer, Hans – labelled by the letter ‘M’ – preys on children using balloons and sweets. His horrific acts are not only investigated by the police but by the victims, gangs and criminals of the town. As part of the Peter Lorre season at the BFI, M is a must-see in the actor’s catalogue as it defined his character in many of his future films, »

- Simon Columb

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The Definitive Foreign Language Horror Films: 10-1

9 August 2014 7:58 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Here we are at what is a surprisingly modern list. At the beginning of this, I didn’t expect to see so much cultural impact coming from films so recently made, but that’s the way it goes. The films that define the horror genre aren’t necessarily the scariest or the most expensive or even the best. The films that define the genre point to a movement – movies that changed the game and influenced all the films after it. Movies that transcend the horror genre. Movies that broke the mold and changed the way horror can be created.

10. El laberinto del fauno (2006)

English Language Title: Pan’s Labyrinth

Directed by: Gullermo del Toro

It’s more a dark fantasy film than a horror film, but it would be tough to make a list of 50 of those. Plus, it has enough graphic, nightmarish images to push it over the threshold. »

- Joshua Gaul

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Here's What's New on Netflix for August 2014

30 July 2014 1:20 PM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

If you're like us, you can't wait for the first day of every month, because you know that Netflix is going to add a ton of new movies and TV shows. You refresh your account over and over again at midnight, hoping that those titles listed in the "Recently Added" section update with something new and exciting rather than the same ol' titles you've been staring at for the last four weeks.

Well, lo and behold, we've gathered the most exciting movies and TV shows being added to America's most popular streaming service, straight from Netflix themselves.

"Rocky" fans will be pumped to know that the first five boxing flicks (sorry, "Rocky Balboa" fans) will be added August 1, joining other '70s, '80s, and '90s movie favorites "Face/Off" (slow-motion doves!), "Mad Max" (apocalyptic leather!), "Spice World" (spice up your life!), "The Birdcage" (Calista Flockhart was in this, »

- Tim Hayne

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One of Earliest Surviving Academy Award Nominees in Acting Categories Dead at 88

1 June 2014 2:41 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Joan Lorring, 1945 Best Supporting Actress Oscar nominee, dead at 88: One of the earliest surviving Academy Award nominees in the acting categories, Lorring was best known for holding her own against Bette Davis in ‘The Corn Is Green’ (photo: Joan Lorring in ‘Three Strangers’) Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nominee Joan Lorring, who stole the 1945 film version of The Corn Is Green from none other than Warner Bros. reigning queen Bette Davis, died Friday, May 30, 2014, in the New York City suburb of Sleepy Hollow. So far, online obits haven’t mentioned the cause of death. Lorring, one of the earliest surviving Oscar nominees in the acting categories, was 88. Directed by Irving Rapper, who had also handled one of Bette Davis’ biggest hits, the 1942 sudsy soap opera Now, Voyager, Warners’ The Corn Is Green was a decent if uninspired film version of Emlyn Williams’ semi-autobiographical 1938 hit play about an English schoolteacher, »

- Andre Soares

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Director Randy Moore Talks Escape From Tomorrow

20 May 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

Haven't checked out Escape from Tomorrow (review) yet? You should! Recently we had a chance to sit down with director Randy Moore and talk with him about making an undercover horror movie at both the happiest and scariest place on Earth... Disneyland!

DC: Do you feel like the circumstance of shooting Escape from Tomorrow on the sly as you did has stolen the thunder from other aspects of the film? I mean, it’s a neat and unusual feat, but is that all critics and audience talk about?

Randy Moore: Yeah, it took away from the story, but it’s also a double-edged sword. There's just so many films out there now that without the “gimmick” you probably wouldn’t even be interviewing me. So I always knew it would be an issue to deal with, but I told everyone, cast and crew, on our very first day of »

- Staci Layne Wilson

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The Amazing Spider-man 2 – The Review

1 May 2014 2:30 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Here’s the first official entry to “Summertime with the super heroes 2014″(Cap’s return last month would be considered Spring, one supposes). And it’s an old familiar masked face who got a major overhaul (re-boot, re-imagining, etc.) just two Summers ago. 2012′s The Amazing Spider-man proved to click with audiences, so the director and principal actors are back for number two (no bathroom jokes, please!). They’ve gotten the revamped origin story out-of-the-way, so it’s on to new challenges, and a new super villain. Well, things need to be ramped-up, so it’s three, count em’, three super villains from the classic comic book rogues’ gallery: Electro, the Rhino, and, returning to the big screen from the original Sam Raimi-directed trilogy, the Green Goblin. Will they triple the excitement factor from the first flick, or will they cancel out the charm factor, mainly being the romance of Peter and Gwen? »

- Jim Batts

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90′S Horror Kid TV Spotlight: Gravedale High

21 April 2014 11:30 AM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

(Author’s Note: This is part of an ongoing series where Bj Colangelo takes a trip down memory lane and talks about the kid friendly horror TV shows from the 1990s/early 2000s that helped shape her into the horror loving fangirl she is today.)

Before Monster High dolls dominated the world of girl’s toys, there were a slew of high school horror themed cartoons in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but none were as awesome as Rick Moranis In Gravedale High. Anytime a television show attempts to gain momentum by name dropping Rick Moranis, it can be safely assumed I’m already going to be addicted.  Although the show only ran for one season, the Universal Monster inspired cartoon high school became a quick favorite for 90′s kids and is still a popular source for fan-fiction and roleplaying communities today.

Gravedale High revolved around the misadventures of »

- BJ Colangelo

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Mickey Rooney Appreciation: Noir Films Showed He Was More Than a Teen Star

8 April 2014 7:55 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

From 1937 to 1946, Mickey Rooney played clean-cut, wide-eyed Midwestern teenager Andy Hardy 15 times in a series of films that proved instrumental (along with his Judy Garland musicals) in making him one of the most popular movie stars of his era. They also surely came to feel like a gilded prison around the actor. By the time the series ended, the Hardy character had been to WWII and back (as had Rooney), yet still seemed incapable of getting past first base with a girl (whereas Rooney was already on the second of his eight marriages).

The Mickster’s thirst for more adult roles was palpable, and Hollywood took a few different stabs at figuring out what to do with him. There was a series of sports films designed to show off the five-foot-two actor’s virile, athletic side: the boxing drama “Killer McCoy” (1947), in which he is a highly improbable light heavyweight »

- Scott Foundas

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New Directors/New Films Review: Quiet, Introspective And Surprising 'Buzzard'

31 March 2014 3:03 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

It's hard to look away from the face of Joshua Burge: his bug eyes recall Peter Lorre in their constant vigilant paranoia. But his angular femininity that comes from his soft mouth and sleek cheekbones suggest an approachability that contrasts with the sharpness of his more intimidating features. He would have played villains and scoundrels in the silent era, ones that had a vulnerable secret. Joel Potrykus' “Buzzard” reveals that not much has changed since then. Burge's Marty works in bank supplies, where he listlessly zones out as an intern at an anonymous cubicle. His responsibilities are limited, and because of a lax work environment, he commits various abuses in the name of a little extra cash, like returning expensive unused supplies for cash or taking extended breaks to stretch his few dollars to the maximum. It's a relatively joyless existence: Marty is the kind of guy who »

- Gabe Toro

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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