IMDb > Peter Lorre > News
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

News for
Peter Lorre (I) More at IMDbPro »

Connect with IMDb

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 41 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »

Today is Boris Karloff’s Birthday – Here Are His Ten Best Films

23 November 2015 5:53 AM, PST | | See recent news »

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

No other actor in the long history of horror has been so closely identified with the genre as Boris Karloff, yet he was as famous for his gentle heart and kindness as he was for his screen persona. William Henry Pratt was born on November 23, 1887, in Camberwell, London, England. He studied at London University in anticipation of a diplomatic career; however, he moved to Canada in 1909 and joined a theater company where he was bit by the acting bug. It was there that he adopted the stage name of “Boris Karloff.” He toured back and forth across the USA for over ten years in a variety of low-budget Theater shows and eventually ended up in Hollywood. Needing cash to support himself, Karloff landed roles in silent films making his on-screen debut in Chapter 2 of the 1919 serial The Masked Rider.  His big »

- Movie Geeks

Permalink | Report a problem

Passage to Marseille

14 November 2015 6:13 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Michael Curtiz's wartime tale of Devil's Island convict Humphrey Bogart fighting to get back and defend France has a still-controversial scene of violence. The convoluted storyline nests enough flashbacks-within-flashbacks to confuse any viewer, and packs the screen with every actor on the Warner lot who can handle a foreign accent. With Claude Rains, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, George Tobias, and Michèle Morgan. Passage to Marseille Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1944 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 109 min. / Street Date November 10, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Humphrey Bogart, Claude Rains, Michèle Morgan, Philip Dorn, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, George Tobias, Helmut Dantine, John Loder, Victor Francen, Vladimir Sokoloff, Eduardo Ciannelli. Cinematography James Wong Howe Art Direction Carl Julius Weyl Film Editor Owen Marks Original Music Max Steiner Written by Casey Robinson, Jock Moffitt from a novel by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall Produced by Jack L. Warner Directed by Michael Curtiz »

- Glenn Erickson

Permalink | Report a problem

Tenderness of the Wolves | Blu-ray Review

10 November 2015 8:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

At long last, a worthy digital transfer has been granted the rather grim and horrific Tenderness of the Wolves, an obscure title from the extensive universe of Rainer Werner Fassbinder, here serving as producer. The fourth title assembled under Fassbinder’s production company Tango-Film, Ulli Lommel takes on directorial duty for what stands as the his most notable title. But Lommel’s contributions take a back seat to leading star and screenwriter Kurt Raab. Both members of Fassbinder’s extensive cinematic troupe, having starred in 1969’s Love is Colder Than Death, along with several future affiliations, the film’s production history proves to have its own potent elements dictating the final memorable outcome.

Padded out with a ton of notable Fassbinder faces, it’s a wonder this title isn’t more well-known, even as a cult favorite. But its explicit homosexual content, derided as harmful and negative at the time, »

- Nicholas Bell

Permalink | Report a problem

Tenderness of the Wolves

9 November 2015 7:48 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The catalyst behind Ulli Lommel's perverse horror masterpiece might be writer-actor-art director Kurt Raab. He's almost too convincing as Fritz Haarmann, an infamous real-life serial killer of young men who masks his abominable activities behind a snitch relationship with the police. He's an obscene cross between Peter Lorre's child-murderer and the ghoul Nosferatu. Tenderness of the Wolves Region B Blu-ray + Pal DVD Arrow Video (UK) 1973 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 80 min. / Die Zärtlichkeit der Wölfe / Street Date November 2, 2015 / £12.99 Starring Kurt Raab, Jeff Roden, Margit Carstensen, Ingrid Caven, Wolfgang Schenck, Brigitte Mira, Rainer Hauer, Barbara Bertram, Rainer Werner Fassbinder. Cinematography Jürgen Jürges Production Design Kurt Raab Makeup Elfie Kruse Editing Thea Eymèsz Original Music Peter Raben Written by Kurt Raab Produced by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Michael Fengler Directed by Ulli Lommel

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Movie horrors can't compete with real life any more, in an overcrowded, often hostile world that seems to encourage terrible crimes. »

- Glenn Erickson

Permalink | Report a problem

25 Great Horror Movies for Halloween

31 October 2015 4:41 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 It’s Halloween, the time of year for watching horror films with the lights out. You may be trying to decide which films you should watch for your Halloween scare-fest. There are many good films, depending on your taste. As a Halloween gift to you, Cinelinx lists 25 of the best horror films to watch, for your Halloween enjoyment. All these films are of excellent quality and convey the requisite eeriness and suspenseful mood to keep you in the creepy Halloween mood.

First…here’s a couple of Honorable Mentions: 

Silence of the Lambs (1991) Hugely successful suspense thriller film that isn’t technically a horror movie but it’s close. This classy chiller became one of the few movies ever to capture the 'Big Five' awards at the Oscars. (Best picture; Best director for Jonathan Demme; Best actor for Anthony Hopkins; Best Actress for Jodie Foster; and best screenplay by Ted Tally. »

- (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem

Noah Wyle interview: The Librarians, ER, playing Steve Jobs

30 October 2015 10:10 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »




As The Librarians returns to Syfy UK, we chatted to Noah Wyle about directing, Falling Skies, and Jonathan Frakes peeing in a dumpster…

Since he first appeared as medical student John Carter in the Emergency Room of County General Hospital, Ill., Noah Wyle has specialised in playing a particular type of brainy hero. During his record-breaking tenure in ER, Wyle was notably the first to portray a fictional version of Steve Jobs in biopic Pirates Of Silicon Valley, a part that earned him an invitation from Mr Jobs to play a prank on the audience at the 1999 Macworld Expo.

Among a host of stage and screen roles, Wyle also played the small but memorable role of Dr Monitoff, a science teacher with an interest in parallel universes in 2001's Donnie Darko, followed in 2004 with the part of Flynn Carsen, perpetual student-turned-Indiana-Jones-type in three The Librarian television movies. »

- louisamellor

Permalink | Report a problem

200 Greatest Horror Films (40-31)

29 October 2015 7:19 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Special Mention: The Most Dangerous Game

Directed by Irving Pichel and Ernest B. Schoedsack

Written by James Creelman

USA, 1932

Genre: Survival Horror

The first of many official and unofficial screen versions of Richard Connell’s short story of the same name, The Most Dangerous Game was made in 1932, in the era known as “Pre-Code Hollywood,” a time when filmmakers were able to get away with sexual innuendo, illegal drug use, adultery, abortion, intense violence, homosexuality, and much more. It was during this time that a film like The Most Dangerous Game was allowed to be made and shown to the general public without fear of censorship. The film was put together by producer Willis O’Brien while in pre-production on King Kong, and features several of the same cast and crew members, as well as props and sets from Kong. Despite these obvious cost-cutting measures, Dangerous Game never feels like a second-rate production, »

- Ricky Fernandes

Permalink | Report a problem

6 actors you never knew played James Bond, from Toby Stephens to... Tom Hiddleston?

28 October 2015 2:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Gun to your head - or, rather, powerful laser device pointed close to your groin - you could probably list all six actors who've played James Bond.

But Connery, Brosnan, Moore and so on are the just the tip of the (admittedly quite small) iceberg, as this list of the "other" Bonds proves...

1. Bob Holness

Best known for everyone's favourite pee-themed, letter-obsessed quiz show, Holness enjoyed a wide and varied career before he settled down behind the Blockbusters desk, once working as an airborne traffic reporter and briefly holding down a job in a South African printing press.

How he then ended up as secret agent James Bond 007 seems as great a mystery as "Who are the kind of parents that call their daughter Pussy Galore?" But he did, thanks to a 1956 BBC radio play based on Moonraker.

2. Barry Nelson

Eight years before Sean Connery met Dr No, Barry Nelson »

Permalink | Report a problem

The Definitive Foreign Language Horror Films: 10-1

23 October 2015 7:58 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Here we are at what is a surprisingly modern list. At the beginning of this, I didn’t expect to see so much cultural impact coming from films so recently made, but that’s the way it goes. The films that define the horror genre aren’t necessarily the scariest or the most expensive or even the best. The films that define the genre point to a movement – movies that changed the game and influenced all the films after it. Movies that transcend the horror genre. Movies that broke the mold and changed the way horror can be created.

10. El laberinto del fauno (2006)

English Language Title: Pan’s Labyrinth

Directed by: Gullermo del Toro

It’s more a dark fantasy film than a horror film, but it would be tough to make a list of 50 of those. Plus, it has enough graphic, nightmarish images to push it over the threshold. »

- Joshua Gaul

Permalink | Report a problem

Beggars of Light: The Nitrate Picture Show 2015

2 October 2015 4:44 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

"The music seemed extraordinarily fresh and genuine still. It might grow old-fashioned, he told himself, but never old, surely, while there was any youth left in men. It was an expression of youth–that, and no more; with sweetness and foolishness, the lingering accent, the heavy stresses–the delicacy, too–belonging to that time."—"The Professor's House," Willa CatherHis last words, in a hospital four months later, are said to have been 'Mind your own business!' addressed to an enquirer after the state of his bowels. Friends got to the studio just before the wreckers' ball. Pictures, a profusion, piles of them, littered the floor: of 'a world that will never be seen except in pictures'"—"The Pound Era," Hugh Kenner***Heart Of FIREOften when I go to a movie, usually one made before 1960, I think about the opening scene of The Red Shoes, of Marius Goring and his »

- gina telaroli

Permalink | Report a problem

120 Essential Horror Scenes Part 1: Transformations

30 September 2015 8:58 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

It starts with a cry of pain. Then a look of terror or ecstasy. And then the body starts to change. Hair grows from the knuckles. Maybe the eyes turn black. Sometimes fangs sprout. Before you know it, the person in front of you isn’t a person anymore. The Transformation can be the most horrific moment in a horror film because it’s where the internal becomes the external. No more false faces. No more hiding. And depending how fearsome the new being is, no more running as well.


An American Werewolf in London (1981)– London wolf calling

It starts out so innocently. Knowing that a full moon is approaching, David Kessler (David Naughton) locks himself in the home of nurse Alex Price (Jenny Agutter) in order to be able to transform into a werewolf peacefully, not killing any innocent people and proving that he doesn’t have to commit »

- Staff

Permalink | Report a problem

Cinema Retro's Hank Reineke The Ninth Annual Drive-in Super Monster Rama

18 September 2015 7:47 PM, PDT | | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Normal 0 false false false En-us X-none X-none Normal 0 false false false En-us X-none X-none Normal 0 false false false En-us X-none X-none

By Hank Reineke

The ninth annual Drive-in Super Monster Rama was staged – as is traditional - on the weekend following Labor Day at the Riverside Drive-in, Vandergrift, Pennsylvania. Inaugurated in 2007, this fiendish gathering of monster-movie insomniacs is tailored to those who cherish the classic horror films of the 1960s and 1970s. It’s a thoughtfully programmed and purposely retro affair; fans get to experience (or re-experience) their favorites as they might have when the movies were new – in the witching hour setting of an authentic neighborhood drive-in theater.

With each passing year the Monster Rama grows steadily in attendance and flourishes in reputation. In 2013 the annual gathering spawned a mid-spring sister event, the April Ghoul’s Drive-in Monster Rama. Co-sponsored from inception by George Reis (of the preeminent cult »

- (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem

'20,000 Leagues Under the Sea' Is Next for Director Bryan Singer

17 September 2015 12:33 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Director Bryan Singer is currently in post-production on X-Men: Apocalypse, which is set for release on May 27, 2016, but the director seemingly found the time to put the finishing touches on his next project at the same time. The filmmaker celebrates his 50th birthday today, and to commemorate the occasion, he posted a new Instagram photo that reveals his next movie is an adaptation of Jules Verne's classic story 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Here's what Bryan Singer had to say in the caption of his Instagram photo, which reveals the title page for his latest script.

"It's my 50th birthday (ouch), and I just put the finishing touches on the script for my next film. A story I've wanted to retell since childhood. I promise this will be an epic and emotional adventure for all ages! An adventure very dear to my heart. Not abandoning the X-Men universe. Very excited about X-Men: Apocalypse and beyond. »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem

Ten Best: Deep Sea Thrillers

7 September 2015 7:03 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

To mark the release of deep sea thriller Pressure, out now on DVD/download starring Danny Huston, Matthew Goode, Joe Cole, Alan McKenna and Daisy Lowe, we take a look at the best deep sea thrillers of all time.

The Hunt For Red October (1990)

Starring: Sean Connery, Alec Baldwin, Scott Glenn

Director: John McTiernan

Das Boot (1981)

Starring: Jürgen Prochnow, Herbert Grönemeyer, Klaus Wennemann

Director: Wolfgang Petersen

20,000 Leagues Under The Sea (1954)

Starring: Kirk Douglas, James Mason, Paul Lukas, Peter Lorre

Director: Richard Fleischer

Jaws (1975)

Starring: Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss

Director: Steven Spielberg

The Abyss (1989)

Starring: Ed Harris, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio and Michael Biehn

Director: James Cameron

The Big Blue (1988)

Starring: Jean-Marc Barr, Jean Reno, Rosanna Arquette, Paul Shenar.

Director: Luc Besson

Pressure (2015)

Starring: Danny Huston, Matthew Goode, Joe Cole, Alan McKenna and Daisy Lowe

Director: Ron Scalpello

Sphere (1998)

Starring: Dustin Hoffman, Sharon Stone, Samuel L. Jackson

Director: Barry Levinson »

- Phil Wheat

Permalink | Report a problem

Vampira And Me – The DVD Review

6 September 2015 8:01 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

Review by Sam Moffitt

Being the first is not always a good thing. Many ground breaking artists who introduce something new into the cultural mix do not always fare well after they have changed the rules and the game. Take, just as one example, Orson Welles who changed forever how movies were made as well as radio drama and stage productions. Although Welles made out better than Maila Nurmi, also known as Vampira, the subject of the incredible and unforgettable documentary Vampira and Me.

H Greene first got to know Maila Nurmi when he interviewed her for a documentary called Schlock! The Secret History of Hollywood, (a good documentary in its own right.) Nurmi had grown distrustful of just about everyone, and with good reason. Yet for reasons Greene doesn’t even speculate on she trusted Greene and gave him almost two hours of interview time and discussed every last moment of her bizarre, »

- Movie Geeks

Permalink | Report a problem

Legendary Bergman on TCM: From Hollywood Career-Ruining Scandal to 3 Oscars and Another Bergman

28 August 2015 12:40 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ingrid Bergman ca. early 1940s. Ingrid Bergman movies on TCM: From the artificial 'Gaslight' to the magisterial 'Autumn Sonata' Two days ago, Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” series highlighted the film career of Greta Garbo. Today, Aug. 28, '15, TCM is focusing on another Swedish actress, three-time Academy Award winner Ingrid Bergman, who would have turned 100 years old tomorrow. TCM has likely aired most of Bergman's Hollywood films, and at least some of her early Swedish work. As a result, today's only premiere is Fielder Cook's little-seen and little-remembered From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (1973), about two bored kids (Sally Prager, Johnny Doran) who run away from home and end up at New York City's Metropolitan Museum. Obviously, this is no A Night at the Museum – and that's a major plus. Bergman plays an elderly art lover who takes an interest in them; her »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem

The top 25 secret agents in film

27 August 2015 6:43 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ahead of American Ultra's arrival in UK cinemas, here's our pick of the 25 finest, sneakiest secret agents in film...

Operatives. Spies. Moles. Infiltrators. Secret agents go by many names. In fact, Britain's national security agency doesn't even call them agents - they're covert human intelligence sources, or simply “officers".

Whatever we choose to call them, secret agents lead necessarily furtive and obscure lives - so obscure that most of what we know about them is defined by what we've seen and read in books and movies.

During the Cold War, the image of the secret agent as a well-groomed sophisticate in a suit proliferated all over the world, and even in the high-tech landscape of the 21st century, that image still stands - just look at such movies as Kingsman: The Secret Service, The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and, of course, the Bond franchise. But secret agents can come in many other guises, »

- simonbrew

Permalink | Report a problem

Marx Bros. Wreak Havoc on TCM Today

14 August 2015 3:24 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Groucho Marx in 'Duck Soup.' Groucho Marx movies: 'Duck Soup,' 'The Story of Mankind' and romancing Margaret Dumont on TCM Grouch Marx, the bespectacled, (painted) mustached, cigar-chomping Marx brother, is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 14, '15. Marx Brothers fans will be delighted, as TCM is presenting no less than 11 of their comedies, in addition to a brotherly reunion in the 1957 all-star fantasy The Story of Mankind. Non-Marx Brothers fans should be delighted as well – as long as they're fans of Kay Francis, Thelma Todd, Ann Miller, Lucille Ball, Eve Arden, Allan Jones, affectionate, long-tongued giraffes, and/or that great, scene-stealing dowager, Margaret Dumont. Right now, TCM is showing Robert Florey and Joseph Santley's The Cocoanuts (1929), an early talkie notable as the first movie featuring the four Marx BrothersGroucho, Chico, Harpo, and Zeppo. Based on their hit Broadway »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem

MGM's Lioness, the Epitome of Hollywood Superstardom, Has Her Day on TCM

10 August 2015 2:19 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Joan Crawford Movie Star Joan Crawford movies on TCM: Underrated actress, top star in several of her greatest roles If there was ever a professional who was utterly, completely, wholeheartedly dedicated to her work, Joan Crawford was it. Ambitious, driven, talented, smart, obsessive, calculating, she had whatever it took – and more – to reach the top and stay there. Nearly four decades after her death, Crawford, the star to end all stars, remains one of the iconic performers of the 20th century. Deservedly so, once you choose to bypass the Mommie Dearest inanity and focus on her film work. From the get-go, she was a capable actress; look for the hard-to-find silents The Understanding Heart (1927) and The Taxi Dancer (1927), and check her out in the more easily accessible The Unknown (1927) and Our Dancing Daughters (1928). By the early '30s, Joan Crawford had become a first-rate film actress, far more naturalistic than »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem

Long Before Day-Lewis, Oscar-Nominated Actor Played Lincoln: TCM 'Stars' Series Continues

8 August 2015 5:19 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Raymond Massey ca. 1940. Raymond Massey movies: From Lincoln to Boris Karloff Though hardly remembered today, the Toronto-born Raymond Massey was a top supporting player – and sometime lead – in both British and American movies from the early '30s all the way to the early '60s. During that period, Massey was featured in nearly 50 films. Turner Classic Movies generally selects the same old MGM / Rko / Warner Bros. stars for its annual “Summer Under the Stars” series. For that reason, it's great to see someone like Raymond Massey – who was with Warners in the '40s – be the focus of a whole day: Sat., Aug. 8, '15. (See TCM's Raymond Massey movie schedule further below.) Admittedly, despite his prestige – his stage credits included the title role in the short-lived 1931 Broadway production of Hamlet – the quality of Massey's performances varied wildly. Sometimes he could be quite effective; most of the time, however, he was an unabashed scenery chewer, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 41 items from 2015   « Prev | Next », Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners