IMDb > Vivien Leigh > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDesk
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDesk
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

News for
Vivien Leigh (I) More at IMDbPro »

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000 | 1998

17 items from 2017


Duel in the Sun

15 August 2017 12:15 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

David O. Selznick’s absurdly over-cooked western epic is a great picture, even if much of it induces a kind of hypnotic, mouth-hanging-open disbelief. Is this monument to the sex appeal of Jennifer Jones, Kitsch in terrible taste, or have Selznick and his army of Hollywood talents found a new level of hyped melodramatic harmony? It certainly has the star-power, beginning with Gregory Peck as a cowboy rapist who learned his bedside manners from Popeye’s Bluto. It’s all hugely enjoyable.

Duel in the Sun

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1946 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 144 min. / Special Edition / Street Date August 15, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring Jennifer Jones, Gregory Peck, Joseph Cotten, Lionel Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Walter Huston, Butterfly McQueen, Charles Bickford, Tilly Losch.

Cinematography Lee Garmes, Ray Rennahan and Harold Rosson

Production Designer J. McMillan Johnson

Film Editor Hal C. Kern, John Saure and William H. Ziegler

Original Music Dimitri Tiomkin

Written by Niven Busch, »

- Glenn Erickson

Permalink | Report a problem


Top 10 Movie Kisses for International Kissing Day

6 July 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Top 10 Movie Kisses for International Kissing DayTop 10 Movie Kisses for International Kissing DayAmanda Wood7/6/2017 10:00:00 Am

Today is International Kissing Day, and you know what that means: we’ve got a list to celebrate.

We couldn’t let this day pass by without commemorating it through a celebration of our favourite on-screen kisses. There have been many memorable make-out moments on-screen throughout the years, but these ten movies have what we consider to be the best of the best. It was honestly difficult to narrow this list down, and much debate was had over the memorability of certain smooches.

We think we’ve got the definitive best kisses list here, with everything from comedies to classic romances to animated films making the cut. Check out the list below!

Never Been Kissed (1999)

Could we really make a top kisses list without including Never Been Kissed? Absolutely not. This delightful tale »

- Amanda Wood

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Star Wars’ Han Solo Spinoff: Lord & Miller Firing Is Latest in Long Line of Director Exits

21 June 2017 2:40 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were dumped from the Han Solo spinoff film this week after more than four months of production, an unusually late date to make a shift behind the camera. That leaves the “Star Wars” production scrambling to find a replacement with weeks left of shooting and a scheduled five weeks of reshoots coming later this summer, an unenviable position for one of the biggest franchises in the entertainment industry and all involved.

The film, which is still untitled, isn’t the first to change its director in midstream. Classics such as “Gone With the Wind” and “Wizard of Oz” cycled through filmmakers, while duds like “The 13th Warrior” and “The Island of Dr. Moreau” also brought in fresh blood in the middle of shooting. But despite plenty of precedents, Lord and Miller’s firing is setting tongues wagging.

“It has certainly happened on a number of occasions, but not under such scrutiny and not usually this far into production,” said Leonard Maltin, a film critic and historian.

Frequently, a director is dropped after he finds himself on the losing end of a power struggle. During “Gone With the Wind,” Clark Gable pushed to have George Cukor replaced with Victor Fleming because Gable felt that the filmmaker was paying too much attention to his co-star, Vivien Leigh. While shooting “Spartacus,” Kirk Douglas used his clout to have Anthony Mann replaced with Stanley Kubrick because he believe that his hand-picked substitute could better handle the film’s epic scope. And in “Waterworld” it was Kevin Costner, and not credited director Kevin Reynolds, who handled the film’s final cut after the two clashed on the notoriously troubled and costly production.

Related

Why Movies Need Directors Like Phil Lord and Chris Miller More Than Ever

More recently, Steven Soderbergh left “Moneyball” due to his desire to shoot documentary-style, while Pixar parted ways with the the directors of several of its films, from “Ratatouille” to the “Brave” to “The Good Dinosaur,” over differing creative ideas about the animated offerings. In most cases, these movies survived their filmmaking shuffles to succeed financially and artistically, proving that a rocky path to the big screen does not necessarily foretell doom.

That’s to say nothing of the pictures whose financial backers probably wished in retrospect that they’d pulled the plug on a director. Costly overruns on “Heaven’s Gate,” Michael Cimino’s brooding Western epic, essentially bankrupted United Artists, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s “Cleopatra” went so egregiously over budget that it brought Fox to the brink of financial ruin. Perhaps another filmmaker would have been able to rein in some of the spending?

But there are reasons why studios have historically been loathe to make a change after cameras start rolling.

“Once a film begins production it’s a runaway train and the backers of the film are reluctant to remove the conductor from the train for fear of it being even more of a disaster,” said Howard Suber, a professor of film history at UCLA. “It becomes a decision between cutting your losses and possibly starting all over again or hoping that things somehow are able to get better.”

It’s harder to overhaul a project without drawing a lot of scrutiny. In the days of “The Wizard of Oz” or “Gone With the Wind,” the public wasn’t as versed in film production — studios might expect a report of a production shakeup in a trade paper such as Variety, but it rarely filtered out across the mass media. That’s no longer the case. From Entertainment Tonight to the New York Times to Twitter, news of Lord and Miller’s ouster was ubiquitous this week.

“The public is now reading about controversies on films and who gets hired here and who gets fired there,” said Dana Polan, professor of cinema studies at Nyu. “That was not a thing before.”

In the case of the Han Solo spinoff shakeup, insiders say that Lord and Miller clashed with Lucasfilm chief Kathleen Kennedy and writer and executive producer Lawrence Kasdan over their vision for the film and its execution. Lord and Miller wanted to inject more cheekiness into the “Star Wars” universe and encouraged improvisation on set. Kasdan and Kennedy believed in adhering more tightly to the script and were concerned that the directors were deviating too far from the franchise’s “house style.” They preferred something that was more reverent, which they might get if Ron Howard or Joe Johnston, both rumored to be in the running for the gig, take over as director.

The Lord and Miller firing is also a reminder of a new cinematic reality. Auteur theory, a popular school of thought in film criticism, once held that the director is the true author of a film because he or she makes the key audio and visual decisions. That view was given so much credence that 1980’s “The Stunt Man” offered up Peter O’Toole as a God-like film director, an artistic zealot willing to trample over anyone and everyone in order to get the perfect shot.

Miller and Lord’s ouster, however, demonstrates the limitations of a director’s power in a rapidly changing movie landscape. It’s a caste structure in which brands, be they costumed heroes or robots,  are the true stars in Hollywood. As Lord and Miller discovered, no filmmaker is more important than the Jedi mythology that lies at the heart of the “Star Wars” universe. With billions of dollars in box office and merchandising at stake, studios aren’t as receptive to a director who wants to take an iconoclastic approach to the material.

Related

12 Directors Who Were Pushed from the Director’s Chair

As studios have grown more corporate and more dependent on a few major franchises, productions have become more bureaucratic. It’s Kennedy and her team at Lucasfilm who are making most of the major decisions about where to take the “Star Wars” universe, just as executive teams at DC (Geoff Johns and Jon Berg) and Marvel (Kevin Feige) are exerting enormous control over the gestations of the various sequels and spinoffs that they churn out annually. In the old days, the first move would be to hire a director. Now, a filmmaker is often brought onto a project after a script has been written and even storyboarded.

Whether it’s Lord and Miller on the Han Solo film or Rian Johnson on “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” the directors aren’t generals marshaling their film crews and casts into battle. They’re hired guns.

There’s a lot less job stability when you’re a mercenary.

Related storiesRon Howard to Take Over as Director of 'Star Wars' Han Solo SpinoffWhy Movies Need Directors Like Phil Lord and Chris Miller More Than Ever'Star Wars' Han Solo Spinoff: Lord & Miller Fired After Clashing With Kathleen Kennedy (Exclusive) »

- Brent Lang

Permalink | Report a problem


Lord and Miller: 12 other directors who left/got fired from movies during production

21 June 2017 5:52 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Luke Owen looks at directors who left/got fired from movies during production…

With the shocking news that Phil Lord and Chris Miller have vacated the director’s chairs for the yet-to-be-titled Han Solo movie over “creative differences” (some sources say they were forced out), I thought it was time to look at some other directors who faced similar issues.

It’s no secret that making a tentpole movie for a studio is tricky. Duncan Jones has been very vocal as of late about the issues he had with last year’s Warcraft, and it was rumoured a few years ago that Gareth Edwards faced an uphill battle with Warner Bros. and Legendary on 2014’s Godzilla reboot. The 1993 Super Mario Bros. movie had its script re-written the weekend before production started with no input from the directors, who were then locked out of the editing room during post-production (they were eventually let back in).

Most of the time directors leave before production actually starts, and someone new is brought in. Edgar Wright left Ant-Man, Patty Jenkins left Thor: The Dark World, Rick Famuyiwa and Seth Grahame-Smith both left The Flash, Ben Affleck stepped down from The Batman, Stephen Herrick left Lara Croft: Tomb Raider; the list goes on. But very rarely does a director leave (or get fired) while the movie is in production. Usually if a studio loses faith in the director at that point, they would bring in someone else to “oversee” the movie and get it over the finish line. The aforementioned Godzilla saw this very occurrence, as did Mission: Impossible II when the legendary Stuart Baird was brought in to “fix” the movie Jon Woo originally helmed. Baird in fact has a long history with this, being a fixer on titles such as Superman: The Motion Picture, The Omen and Lethal Weapon.

There are still four or so weeks left on the Han Solo movie (plus the already planned reshoots), so let’s look back at a few other directors who left/got fired from their films.

The Wizard of Oz, 1939

It seems crazy to think that one of the most beloved movies of all-time had such a tumultuous production, but The Wizard of Oz in fact saw six different directors helm the movie. Norman Taurog originally shot test footage, but was quickly replaced with Richard Thorpe who shot for around two weeks when Taurog was moved to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Producer Mervyn LeRoy felt that Thorpe was rushing the production, and his short time on the film was probably not helped when original Tin Man Buddy Epsen was hospitalised after the metal make-up coated his lungs and left him on an Iron Lung.

None of Thorpe’s footage made it into the final cut (although he did shoot Dorothy’s first meeting Scarecrow and several scenes at The Wicked Witch’s castle), and George Cucker came in after Thorpe was fired. However, Cucker didn’t actually shoot any footage, and was there to simply oversee the plans to re-shoot all of Thorpe’s work until Victor Fleming came in. Although he was eventually the only credited director, Fleming left before production ended to film Gone with the Wind, and the shooting was finished by King Vidor and LeRoy.

Gone with the Wind, 1939

Speaking of Gone with the Wind, George Cucker had been developing the movie with producer David O. Selznick for around two years, but was removed from the project three weeks into production. According to reports, the decision to remove Cucker was Clark Gable’s and it angered fellow co-stars Vivien Leigh and Olivia de Havilland who went to Selznick’s office to demand he be re-hired. In Cucker’s place was Victor Fleming, who shot the majority of the movie over ninety-three days (although Cucker was secretly coaching Leigh and Havilland behind the scenes). Fleming wasn’t the final name on the movie however, as he had to take a short break due to exhaustion and Sam Wood shot for around twenty-three days.

Spartacus, 1960

Although considered a Stanley Kubrick movie, he wasn’t the first name attached to Spartacus. After David Lean turned down the movie, it was offered to Anthony Mann who was then fired by star Kirk Douglas after just one week of production. According to Douglas in his autobiography, Mann was “scared” of the size and scope of Spartacus and wasn’t capable of finishing the film.

Superman II, 1980

Shooting for Superman II was done alongside Superman: The Motion Picture in 1977 with Richard Donner doing both films. However the film was under a lot of pressure, with overrunning schedules and budget, which producers Alexander and Ilya Salkind and Pierre Spengler attributed to Donner. After everything was shot for Superman: The Motion Picture, Superman II was placed on hiatus. Once Superman: The Motion Picture was an instant hit, the producers brought in Richard Lester to replace Donner on Superman II and shoot around the footage already filmed. Why Lester replaced Donner is still up for debate. Spengler has claimed that Donner was asked to come back but refused, while Donner claims he only found out Superman II was getting underway when he received a fax from the Salkinds telling him his services weren’t required.

The cast and crew did not take the replacement lightly, with creative consultants Tom Mankiewicz and editor Stuart Baird refusing to return for the sequel, along with Gene Hackman who was replaced with a body double. Although Marlon Brando had already shot everything for both movies, he successfully sued the Salkinds who then cut him out of the sequel. Years later, Warner Bros. released the Richard Donner cut of Superman II on home video as Superman II: The Donner Cut.

Piranha II: The Spawning, 1981

Piranha II was originally set to be directed by Roger Corman graduate Miller Drake, who envisioned a version of the movie which saw the return of Kevin McCarthy (who died in the original film). Drake was then replaced with James Cameron who was working on the film’s special effects department, and he then re-wrote the script under the pseudonym H.A. Milton. However around two weeks into production, Cameron was fired by producer Ovidio G. Assonitis who felt he wasn’t doing a good enough job. Assonitis wouldn’t let Cameron review any of the footage he’d shot during his time on the movie, and was even making all of the day-to-day decisions.

A regularly reported story was that Cameron broke into the editing room while the producers were in Cannes to cut his version of the movie, which was then re-cut by Assonitis. “Then the producer wouldn’t take my name off the picture because [contractually] they couldn’t deliver it with an Italian name,” Cameron said in a 1991 La Times interview. “So they left me on, no matter what I did. I had no legal power to influence him from Pomona, California, where I was sleeping on a friend’s couch. I didn’t even know an attorney. In actual fact, I did some directing on the film, but I don’t feel it was my first movie.”

WarGames, 1983

WarGames began life as a very different movie titled The Genius in 1979 about a much older gentlemen, but this changed when writers Walter F. Parkes and Lawrence Lasker discovered a large youth-movement in the computer world, who would later be known as hackers. The character of David Lightman (played by Matthew Broderick) was even modeled after hacking enthusiast David Scott Lewis.

When the film went into production it was being helmed by Martin Brest who was then removed from the movie 12-days into shooting after a disagreement with the producers. In his place was John Badham, whose first act was to lighten the tone of the movie. “[Brest had] taken a somewhat dark approach to the story, and saw Matthew’s character as someone who was rebelling against his parents, and who was just kind of stewing inside,” he told The Hollywood Interview in 2009. “There was that tone to it. I said ‘If I was 16 and could get on a computer and change my grades or my girlfriend’s grades, I would be peeing in my pants with excitement!’ And the way it was shot, it was like they were doing some Nazi undercover thing. So it was my job to make it seem like they were having fun, and that it was exciting, but it wasn’t this dark rebellion.” »

- Luke Owen

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Certain Women,’ ‘The Piano Teacher,’ and More Join The Criterion Collection in September

16 June 2017 4:27 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

While the vast majority of our favorite films of last year have been treated with Blu-ray releases, one title near the top of the list we’ve been waiting the longest for is Kelly Reichardt‘s Certain Women. It looks like it’s been worth the wait as The Criterion Collection have unveiled their September releases and it’s leading the pack (with special features also an interview with the director and Todd Haynes!).

Also getting a release in September, is Michael Haneke‘s Isabelle Huppert-led The Piano Teacher and the recent documentary David Lynch: The Art Life (arriving perfectly-timed to the end of the new Twin Peaks). There’s also Alfred Hitchcock‘s classic psychodrama Rebecca and the concert film Festival, featuring Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Johnny Cash, and many more.

Check out the high-resolution cover art and full details on the releases below, with more on Criterion’s site. »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Rachel Weisz on the Importance of Secrets, Her Dream Job, and ‘My Cousin Rachel’

8 June 2017 5:10 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Characters like the one that gives its title to My Cousin Rachel are usually played with broad strokes, either to elicit extreme sympathy, or total disdain, and yet what Rachel Weisz does in Roger Michell’s adaptation of the Daphne du Maurier novel is unlike either of those, it’s a performance so layered that it would unfair to say it lies even in between. We are supposed to mistrust Rachel from the moment we first hear her name, after all she is the stranger who has seduced Philip’s (Sam Claflin) saintly cousin, made him renounce his bachelorhood, and abandon his beloved England. Not only that, but according to some suspicions, she might have even been behind his untimely death, meaning there is nothing left for Philip to do but seek revenge.

And yet upon meeting Rachel, Philip discovers something quite unexpected, rather than a severe gorgon, he finds her to be quite sensitive, »

- Jose Solís

Permalink | Report a problem


Lgbt Pride Month: TCM Showcases Gay and Lesbian Actors and Directors

1 June 2017 5:40 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Considering everything that's been happening on the planet in the last several months, you'd have thought we're already in November or December – of 2117. But no. It's only June. 2017. And in some parts of the world, that's the month of brides, fathers, graduates, gays, and climate change denial. Beginning this evening, Thursday, June 1, Turner Classic Movies will be focusing on one of these June groups: Lgbt people, specifically those in the American film industry. Following the presentation of about 10 movies featuring Frank Morgan, who would have turned 127 years old today, TCM will set its cinematic sights on the likes of William Haines, James Whale, George Cukor, Mitchell Leisen, Dorothy Arzner, Patsy Kelly, and Ramon Novarro. In addition to, whether or not intentionally, Claudette Colbert, Colin Clive, Katharine Hepburn, Douglass Montgomery (a.k.a. Kent Douglass), Marjorie Main, and Billie Burke, among others. But this is ridiculous! Why should TCM present a »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Looking Back at the True Beauty of 20 Star Actresses From Another Time Period

5 April 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

While the current crop of female movie stars is nothing short of extraordinary, we’ll always have a place for the classic women of cinema.   These are the women who go way back to the 40s, 50s, and even early 60s.   We’re talking names like Marilyn Monroe, Jayne Mansfield, Vivian Leigh, Ava Gardner, and the list goes on and on.  Beauty back then wasn’t looked at in the same way as it is today.  And it certainly wasn’t displayed in ways it is today. Back then it was way more subtle.  It might have been a wink or a certain facial

Looking Back at the True Beauty of 20 Star Actresses From Another Time Period »

- Nat Berman

Permalink | Report a problem


On this day: Vivien's Oscar, Kevin's Bacon, Carter's Write-Down

20 March 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

On this day in showbiz history

The Story of Miss Lonelyheart from Péter Lichter on Vimeo.

1913/1914 Did you know that Detective Doyle (Wendell Corey) and Miss Lonelyhearts (Judith Evelyn) from Rear Window shared a birthday? Now you do! (Uff, I love Rear Window so much)

1942 Rings on Her Finger, a screwball comedy starring Henry Fonda and Gene Tierney opens in theaters

1948 Gentleman's Agreement wins Best Picture at the 1947 Oscars but the enduring statues from that year are surely Edmund Gwenn's Supporting Actor win as Kris Kringle in Miracle on 34th Street and the Cinematography and Art Direction wins for the astounding Black Narcissus. What a picture! 

1952 Vivien Leigh wins her second Best Actress prize at the 1951 Oscars for A Streetcar Named Desire. Absent from the ceremony, Greer Garson accepts for Vivien...

»

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


A Streetcar Named Desire Screens in St. Louis for the Tennessee Williams Birthday Bash March 26th

9 March 2017 8:32 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“I have always depended on the kindness of strangers.”

The 1951 film A Streetcar Named Desire ‎starring Vivien Leigh‎ and ‎Marlon Brando will screen Sunday March 26th  at Brown Hall Auditorium on the campus of Washington University. This is to celebrate playwright Tennessee Williams 106th Birthday. The screening is at 7pm and is followed by a reception that will be attended by Tennessee Williams’ niece Francesca Williams. This event is Free and open to the public.

Ahead of its time in how it showed raw and naked sexual and emotional passions on the screen, A Streetcar Named Desire made 27 year-old Marlon Brando, who also played the role of Stanley Kowalski on Broadway, an overnight sensation and one of the all-time greats of the silver screen. Blanche Dubois (Viven Leigh) is a Southern belle, one who had every man in the palm of her man. Blanche moves in with her sister Stella (Kim Hunter) and her husband, »

- Tom Stockman

Permalink | Report a problem


Film News: TCM Host & Film Historian Robert Osborne Dies at 84

6 March 2017 12:11 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

New York City – Robert Osborne, one of the great film advocates and historians of our era, who hosted on Turner Classic Movies (TCM) with passionate skill from 1994 until recently, has passed away on March 6th, 2017, in New York City. The way that Mr. Osborne inspired film lovers everywhere was deep and influential. He was 84.

I was lucky enough to meet the man, naturally at a Chicago movie theater, back in 2005. Five years later, as I became a film reporter myself, I got to interview Ro via phone. He was the type of film man that you could spend a month with and never come to the end of his knowledge, and the way he shared it as the host on TCM was as if the finest uncle was giving us life lessons. Next to Roger Ebert, Robert Osborne is another reporter legend who galvanized my love for film.

King of the Classics: Robert Osborne, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Exclusive Interview: Alexandra Rosario talks California Dreams

23 February 2017 10:00 PM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

In an exclusive interview, Flickering Myth sat down with New York-based actress Alexandra Rosario to talk about acting and the release of her latest film California Dreams

Have you always wanted to be an actress? How did acting come about for you?

Yes, I always wanted to be an actress, since I was 6 years old. I have no idea where that desire came from, I just always had an internal certainty of acting being my calling in life. And that has never changed!

What and who inspired you to become an actress?

When I was growing up I used to watch a lot of movies. At times I would get deeply touched by an actor’s great performance and it would stay with me for a while. I used to dream that one day I would be able to do the same. Some of the actors that have inspired me are Meryl Streep, »

- Amie Cranswick

Permalink | Report a problem


Baftas 2017: Eight talking points

12 February 2017 4:54 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

From La La Land’s potential sweep to an overlooked diversity conundrum, Screen weighs in.

Screen runs down eight talking points ahead of tonight’s 70th British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Check back in at 6.30pm GMT to follow our coverage live.

1. Will La La Land sweep?

Will La La Land sweep the boards following its mighty 11 nominations or will Moonlight or Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake be able to pull off an upset or two?

2. Will Arrival or Nocturnal Animals feel the love?

Following their near-Oscar shutout, can two of this year’s Venice favourites find cheer among UK voters? »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Baftas: Eight talking points

12 February 2017 4:54 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

From La La Land’s potential sweep to an overlooked diversity conundrum, Screen weighs in.

Screen runs down eight talking points ahead of tonight’s 70th British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Check back in at 6.30pm GMT to follow our coverage live.

1. Will La La Land sweep?

Will La La Land sweep the boards following its mighty 11 nominations or will Moonlight or Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake be able to pull off an upset or two?

2. Will Arrival or Nocturnal Animals feel the love?

Following their near-Oscar shutout, can two of this year’s Venice favourites find cheer among UK voters?

3. Bafta is doing well on diversity but it may be time for a female host…

In recent months Bafta has tweaked its eligibility criteria and developed initiatives to promote diversity. It is doing the right things. The makeup of the nominees is more varied than in recent years but the »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Eight talking points ahead of the Baftas

12 February 2017 4:54 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

From La La Land’s potential sweep to an overlooked diversity conundrum, Screen weighs in.

Screen runs down eight talking points ahead of tonight’s 70th British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Check back in at 7pm GMT to follow our coverage live.

1. Will La La Land sweep?

Will La La Land sweep the boards following its mighty 11 nominations or will Moonlight or Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake be able to pull off an upset or two?

2. Will Arrival or Nocturnal Animals feel the love?

Following their near-Oscar shutout, can two of this year’s Venice favourites find cheer among UK voters?

3. Bafta is doing well on diversity but it may be time for a female host…

In recent months Bafta has tweaked its eligibility criteria and developed initiatives to promote diversity. It is doing the right things. The makeup of the nominees is more varied than in recent years but the »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Michael Redington obituary

5 February 2017 9:30 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

In 1948 my father, Michael Redington, was a young member of the Old Vic Company’s triumphant tour of Australia, headed by Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh. His admiration for both actors was boundless, and Olivier’s performance as Richard III, he felt, was a theatrical epiphany.

But when he married Ann Connell two years later, Michael accepted an actor’s life was precarious and joined Atv, taking on a role in live television production. He worked with Kenneth Clark in the early 1960s before the art historian’s great success with the BBC Civilisation series. He also put TV religious programmes on the map, securing a Bafta for his efforts. Michael won an Eisenhower fellowship and travelled throughout the Us in the 60s during the time of the civil rights movement.

Continue reading »

- Simon Redington

Permalink | Report a problem


Cohen Media Group Launches New Classic Film Series With Chuck Workman Documentary ‘What Is Cinema?’

27 January 2017 4:00 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Turner Classic Movies and Robert Osborne are getting some healthy competition as Cohen Media Group launches ‘Cohen Film Classics,’ a new classic film series, hosted and curated by Cmg CEO and consummate cinephile Charles Cohen. The series premieres Friday night, with Academy Award winning filmmaker Chuck Workman’s 2013 documentary, “What is Cinema?”

Workman’s documentary combines archival interviews with film visionaries such as Chantal Akerman, Robert Bresson, Robert Altman, and Akira Kurosawa, along with newly conducted ones with Mike Leigh, David Lynch, and Jonas Mekas. In their own words, the filmmakers explore the meaning of the art to which they have devoted their lives.

Read More: ‘Downton Abbey’ Creator Julian Fellowes Reveals He’s Working on a Film Version

Following the premiere of “What Is Cinema?,” the series will show these four films every Friday in February: “Sudden Fear,” from 1952, featuring Joan Crawford and Jack Palance, “Hangmen Also Die,” Fritz Lang »

- Jude Dry

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000 | 1998

17 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners