IMDb > Vivien Leigh > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000 | 1998

17 items from 2015


Film Critic Calls for Banishment of ‘Gone With the Wind’ Over ‘Insidious’ Racism

25 June 2015 10:19 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Film critic Lou Lumenick is arguing that Oscar winner “Gone with the Wind” is as racist as the Confederate flag, and should be subject to the same amount of scrutiny. In a New York Post column, Lumenick argues in the post that the 1939 Best Picture winner starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh is a relic of America’s racist past, and like the Confederate flag, it should be relegated to museums and history books. Though it may not be as overtly racist as D.W. Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation,” the critic says that “Gone with the Wind” is just as problematic. »

- Reid Nakamura

Permalink | Report a problem


The Top Father's Day Films Ever Made? Here Are Five Dads - Ranging from the Intellectual to the Pathological

22 June 2015 4:02 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Father of the Bride': Steve Martin and Kimberly Williams. Top Five Father's Day Movies? From giant Gregory Peck to tyrant John Gielgud What would be the Top Five Father's Day movies ever made? Well, there have been countless films about fathers and/or featuring fathers of various sizes, shapes, and inclinations. In terms of quality, these range from the amusing – e.g., the 1950 version of Cheaper by the Dozen; the Oscar-nominated The Grandfather – to the nauseating – e.g., the 1950 version of Father of the Bride; its atrocious sequel, Father's Little Dividend. Although I'm unable to come up with the absolute Top Five Father's Day Movies – or rather, just plain Father Movies – ever made, below are the first five (actually six, including a remake) "quality" patriarch-centered films that come to mind. Now, the fathers portrayed in these films aren't all heroic, loving, and/or saintly paternal figures. Several are »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


After Christopher Lee, Another Nonagenarian British Actor Has Died: Oscar Nominee Moody

12 June 2015 4:05 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody in 'Oliver!' movie. Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' actor nominated for an Oscar dead at 91 (Note: This Ron Moody article is currently being revised.) Two well-regarded, nonagenarian British performers have died in the last few days: 93-year-old Christopher Lee (June 7, '15), best known for his many portrayals of Dracula and assorted movie villains and weirdos, from the title role in The Mummy to Dr. Catheter in Gremlins 2: The New Batch. 91-year-old Ron Moody (yesterday, June 11), among whose infrequent film appearances was the role of Fagin, the grotesque adult leader of a gang of boy petty thieves, in the 1968 Best Picture Academy Award-winning musical Oliver!, which also earned him a Best Actor nomination. Having been featured in nearly 200 movies and, most importantly, having had his mainstream appeal resurrected by way of the villainous Saruman in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit movies (and various associated merchandising, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


What’s Up Doc?: Sheffield & AFI Docs Signal the Summer Fest Drought

1 June 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Well folks, after a rather long and brutal winter (at least for me here in Buffalo), we are finally heading into the wonderful warmth of summer, but with that blast of sunshine and steamy humidity comes the mid-year drought of major film fests. After the Sheffield Doc/Fest concludes on June 10th and AFI Docs wraps on June 21st, we likely won’t see any major influx in our charts until Locarno, Venice, Telluride and Tiff announce their line-ups in rapid succession. In the meantime, we can look forward to the intriguing onslaught of films making their debut in Sheffield, including Brian Hill’s intriguing examination of Sweden’s most notorious serial killer, The Confessions of Thomas Quick, and Sean McAllister’s film for which he himself was jailed in the process of making, A Syrian Love Story, the only two films world premiering in the festival’s main competition. »

- Jordan M. Smith

Permalink | Report a problem


Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

Permalink | Report a problem


Stewart 'in Talks' to Be Featured in Subversive Iraq War Homefront Satire

4 April 2015 1:36 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Kristen Stewart, 'Camp X-Ray' star, to join cast of 'Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk' Kristen Stewart to join 'Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk' movie After putting away her Bella Swan wig and red (formerly brown) contact lenses, Kristen Stewart has been making a number of interesting career choices. Here are three examples: Stewart was a U.S. soldier who befriends an inmate (Peyman Moaadi) at the American Gulag, Guantanamo, in Peter Sattler's little-seen (at least in theaters) Camp X-Ray. She was one of Best Actress Oscar winner Julianne Moore's daughters in Wash Westmoreland and the recently deceased Richard Glatzer's Alzheimer's drama Still Alice. She was the personal assistant to troubled, aging actress Juliette Binoche in Olivier Assayas' Clouds of Sils Maria, which earned her a history-making Best Supporting Actress César. (Stewart became the first American actress to take home the French Academy Award. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Movies This Week: April 3-9, 2015

3 April 2015 12:00 PM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

 

This weekend, the Austin Film Society continues with "Perfect Criminals: The 70's French Noir Connection" series, and Friday night has a killer (no pun intended) double feature on tap. Alain Delon stars in Jean-Pierre Melville's 1967 gangster film Le Samourai (for a one-off screening) paired with Le Cercle Rouge, another Melville classic from 1970 that also stars Delon. The latter film will screen again on Monday night and both are presented in 35mm at the Marchesa. Amanda Wilder's Approaching The Elephant is screening on Tuesday for Doc Nights and David Lynch's Blue Velvet screens in 35mm on Wednesday night as part of the "Jewels In The Wasteland" series, although this edition will only include a video introduction from Richard Linklater due to an unexpected conflict. Essential Cinema on Thursday night will feature Elia Kazan's A Streetcar Named Desire, the 1951 film based on the Tennessee Williams play that features »

- Matt Shiverdecker

Permalink | Report a problem


Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

15 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


John Osborne on Film: The Entertainer

13 March 2015 4:25 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Part I. Anger, Suez and Archie Rice

“There they are,” George Devine told John Osborne, surveying The Entertainer‘s opening night audience. “All waiting for you…Same old pack of c***s, fashionable assholes. Just more of them than usual.” The Royal Court had arrived: no longer outcasts, they were London’s main attraction.

Look Back in Anger vindicated Devine’s model of a writer’s-based theater. Osborne’s success attracted a host of dramatists to Sloane Square. There’s Shelagh Delaney, whose A Taste of Honey featured a working-class girl pregnant from an interracial dalliance; Harold Pinter’s The Room, a bizarre “comedy of menace”; and John Arden’s Serjeant Musgrave’s Dance, which aimed a Gatling gun at its audience. Devine encouraged them, however bold or experimental. “You always knew he was on the writer’s side,” Osborne said.

Peter O’Toole called the Royal Court actors “an »

- Christopher Saunders

Permalink | Report a problem


Warner Home Entertainment Announces "The Golden Year Collection" Blu-ray Set

12 March 2015 7:17 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

Revisit 1939, Hollywood’s Greatest Year, with 4 New Blu-ray™ Debuts

The Golden Year Collection June 9

Features Newly Restored Blu-ray Debut of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Starring Charles Laughton, and Blu-ray Debuts of – Bette DavisDark Victory, Errol Flynn’s Dodge City and Greta Garbo’s Ninotchka. Collection also includes Gone With the Wind.

Burbank, Calif. March 10, 2015 – On June 9, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment will celebrate one of the most prolific twelve months in Hollywood’s history with the 6-disc The Golden Year Collection. Leading the five-film set will be the Blu-ray debut of

The Hunchback of Notre Dame, in a new restoration which will have its world premiere at TCM’s Classic Film Festival beginning March 26 in Los Angeles. Charles Laughton and Maureen O’Hara star in Victor Hugo’s tragic tale which William Dieterle directed.

The other films featured in the Wbhe »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


Wright and Goldwyn Have an Ugly Parting of the Ways; Brando (More or Less) Comes to the Rescue

11 March 2015 2:07 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright-Samuel Goldwyn association comes to a nasty end (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Film.") Whether or not because she was aware that Enchantment wasn't going to be the hit she needed – or perhaps some other disagreement with Samuel Goldwyn or personal issue with husband Niven BuschTeresa Wright, claiming illness, refused to go to New York City to promote the film. (Top image: Teresa Wright in a publicity shot for The Men.) Goldwyn had previously announced that Wright, whose contract still had another four and half years to run, was to star in a film version of J.D. Salinger's 1948 short story "Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut." Instead, he unceremoniously – and quite publicly – fired her.[1] The Goldwyn organization issued a statement, explaining that besides refusing the assignment to travel to New York to help generate pre-opening publicity for Enchantment, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


The Surprising History of Oscar Acceptance Speech Thank-Yous

21 February 2015 2:05 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

It's an impressive honor to take home an Oscar. But it's also worth some bragging rights if you can nab an acceptance speech shout-out. Over the decades, winners have created a snowball effect when it comes to the lengthy list of thank-yous they squeeze in. Thanks to some archival digging by Hsbc Bank as part of its "Together, We Advance" campaign, we can pinpoint just who thanked their mom, dad, or even the viewers at home for the first time in Oscar history. Fun fact: Women are more likely to forget their significant others when in a thanking frenzy at the podium! »

- Jacqueline Andriakos, @jandriakos

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 Oscar Previews: Part 2

18 February 2015 2:26 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Our Oscar coverage continues. Here we overview the best acting and best directing award nominees.

The Best Actor Nominees

Steve Carell - as John du Pont in Foxcatcher

Age: 52

Previously Best Known For:

The Office

The 40 Year-Old Virgin

Previous Oscar Nominations/Wins:

None

Interesting Fact: Owns and operates the Marshfield Hills General Store in Marshfield, Massachusetts where he has a summer home.

Bradley Cooper - as Chris Kyle in American Sniper

Age: 40

Previously Best Known For:

The Hangover

Silver Linings Playbook

Previous Oscar Nominations/Wins:

Nomination - Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role 2013- as Richie Dimaso in American Hustle

Nomination - Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role 2012 - as Pat in Silver Linings Playbook

Interesting Fact: Had to miss his graduation commencement at Georgetown University because he was filming Wet Hot American Summer.

Benedict Cumberbatch -  as Alan Turing in The Imitation Game »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

Permalink | Report a problem


Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh love letters to be made public

2 February 2015 9:41 PM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Love letters between Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh are being made public for the first time.

Some 200 previously unpublished letters between the pair will be revealed by the Victoria and Albert museum archives, dating back to the 1930s.

The couple first got together in 1936 after playing lovers in Fire Over England, but had to keep their relationship a secret as they were still married at the time.

"I woke up absolutely raging with desire for you my love... Oh dear God how I did want you. Perhaps you were stroking your darling self," Olivier said in one passionate letter to Leigh.

Another revealing letter reads: "I am sitting naked with just my parts wrapped in your panties. My longing for you is so intense."

Other letters include advice from Olivier to Leigh on her role in Gone with the Wind, saying: "You have got to be damn smart to make »

Permalink | Report a problem


StreamFix: 6 Oscar Frontrunners in Great Roles on Netflix

26 January 2015 5:31 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Newsflash: We still have awhile before the Oscars. It's like a month away. But we can prepare anyway by revisiting the greatest hits of our leading nominees in the acting categories. Put on your angriest Annette Bening face and join us for this trip into prestige pictures currently streaming on Netflix. "The Kids are All Right" (Julianne Moore) Julianne Moore didn't pick up a nomination, but costars Annette Bening and Mark Ruffalo did in this family drama (with funny moments) about a lesbian couple attempting to embrace the new-found presence of their kids' sperm donor. "The Kids are All Right" feels like a lost James L. Brooks gem set in 2010, and every performance has endearing and (intentionally) maddening moments. Julianne might play the most conflicted character at all, and she wears that indecision and personal guilt well.  "My Week With Marilyn" (Eddie Redmayne) Is this a great movie? No. In fact, »

- Louis Virtel

Permalink | Report a problem


Carrie Fisher mocks Debbie Reynolds as she presents 2015 SAG award

26 January 2015 8:32 AM, PST | National Ledger | See recent National Ledger news »

Carrie Fisher mocked her mother Debbie Reynolds as she presented her with a Lifetime Achievement prize at the Screen Actors Guild awards last night (25.01.15). The 'Star Wars' actress gave a humorous introduction to her 82-year-old mom and even referenced her infamous feud with Dame Elizabeth Taylor, who had an affair with her first husband, Carrie's father Eddie Fisher. Carrie said: ''She's been more than a mother to me, not much, but definitely more. She is a movie star, recording artist, television actor, nightclub entertainer, Broadway performer and co-founder of the Thalians, a group that has raised more than $30 million for mental health. Well, mental health-related causes, and $4.5 million of that money is allocated just for me... ''This is an extraordinarily kind, gifted, and funny woman who would give you the shirt off her back if Vivien Leigh hadn't once worn it in 'Gone With the Wind'. »

Permalink | Report a problem


The Definitive Best Picture Losers

1 January 2015 12:22 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

#20. The Exorcist (1973)

Lost to: The Sting

Crammed in between two Best Picture wins for Francis Ford Coppola’s “Godfather” films was an interesting little year that rewarded another pairing of Robert Redford and Paul Newman (trivia: “The Sting’s” Julia Phillips is the first time female producer to ever win Best Picture). The other big landmark – the first time a purely horror film was nominated for Best Picture. “The Exorcist” was nominated for ten Oscars, winning for Sound and Adapted Screenplay. The horrifying story of a young girl possessed was, rumor has it, cursed as they tried to complete the film. This film about the struggle between faith and sin is possibly the most important horror film of all time.

#19. Avatar (2009)

Lost to: The Hurt Locker

The year after “The Dark Knight” and “Wall-e” missed out on Best Picture nominations, the Academy decided to change the rules and allow ten nominees. »

- Joshua Gaul

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000 | 1998

17 items from 2015


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners