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1-20 of 42 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


The O.J. Nobody Knew — Read People's July 4, 1994 Cover Story

20 July 2017 7:22 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Thursday’s parole board hearing marks the latest twist in the saga of O.J. Simpson‘s fall from grace, which began in 1994 with the killing of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend, Ron Goldman.

Prior to the killings, Simpson, now 70, was an American hero, his former prowess on the football field matched by his charm as a celebrity pitchman and actor. But after the slayings, in which Simpson quickly became the suspect, details about rage-filled fights with his ex-wife that were fueled by jealousy began to emerge.

In 1995, after the “Trial of the Century,” Simpson was famously acquitted of double murder, »

- Susan Schindehette

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"Twin Peaks," Episode 10 Recap: True Men

18 July 2017 2:15 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.It's worth quoting the latest (perhaps the last?) gnomic pronouncements from Margaret "The Log Lady" Lanterman (the late Catherine E. Coulson), speaking via phone to Deputy Sheriff Tommy "Hawk" Hill (Michael Horse), in full:  "Hawk—electricity is humming. You hear it in the mountains and rivers. You see it dance among the seas and stars. And glowing around the moon. But in these days, the glow is dying. What will be in the darkness that remains? The Truman brothers are both true men. They are your brothers. And the others, the good ones, who have been with you. Now the circle is almost complete. Watch and listen to the dream of time and space. It all comes out now, flowing like a river. That which is and is not. »

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Peter Kerekes’ ‘Censor’ Wins Karlovy Vary’s Works in Progress Contest

5 July 2017 12:08 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“Censor,” directed and produced by Peter Kerekes, and written by Ivan Ostrochovsky, has won the 14th edition of the Karlovy Vary Film Festival’s Works in Progress competition, which is open to projects from Central and Eastern Europe, the Balkans, Turkey, Greece and former Soviet territories.

The jury, which consisted of Iole Maria Giannattasio, directorate general for cinema at the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage, Activities and Tourism (MiBACT), producer Cedomir Kolar from A.S.A.P. Films, and Susana Santos Rodrigues, a film programmer, distributor, producer and co-founder of Vaivem, awarded the prize to the Slovak film for “its original and vivid human portrait of a lonely woman.”

The film centers on Irina, who works as a censor in a prison in Odessa, Ukraine. She spends eight hours a day in her office reading love letters. “Through her, we follow various love affairs that only she can observe,” according to a statement. “Although »

- Leo Barraclough

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More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals

4 July 2017 11:58 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

(See previous post: Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year.) On the evening of the Fourth of July, besides fireworks, fire hazards, and Yankee Doodle Dandy, if you're watching TCM in the U.S. and Canada, there's the following: Peter H. Hunt's 1776 (1972), a largely forgotten film musical based on the Broadway hit with music by Sherman Edwards. William Daniels, who was recently on TCM talking about 1776 and a couple of other movies (A Thousand Clowns, Dodsworth), has one of the key roles as John Adams. Howard Da Silva, blacklisted for over a decade after being named a communist during the House Un-American Committee hearings of the early 1950s (Robert Taylor was one who mentioned him in his testimony), plays Benjamin Franklin. Ken Howard is Thomas Jefferson, a role he would reprise in John Huston's 1976 short Independence. (In the short, Pat Hingle was cast as John Adams; Eli Wallach was Benjamin Franklin.) Warner »

- Andre Soares

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More Gay Stars and Directors and Screenwriters on TCM: From psychos and psychiatrists to surfers and stage mamas

22 June 2017 6:51 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

On the day a U.S. appeals court lifted an injunction that blocked a Mississippi “religious freedom” law – i.e., giving Christian extremists the right to discriminate against gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgender people, etc. – not to mention the publication of a Republican-backed health care bill targeting the poor, the sick, the elderly, and those with “pre-existing conditions” – which would include HIV-infected people, a large chunk of whom are gay and bisexual men, so the wealthy in the U.S. can get a massive tax cut, Turner Classic Movies' 2017 Gay Pride or Lgbt Month celebration continues (into tomorrow morning, Thursday & Friday, June 22–23) with the presentation of movies by or featuring an eclectic – though seemingly all male – group: Montgomery Clift, Anthony Perkins, Tab Hunter, Dirk Bogarde, John Schlesinger, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Arthur Laurents, and Jerome Robbins. After all, one assumes that, rumors or no, the presence of Mercedes McCambridge in one »

- Andre Soares

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Joe versus the Volcano

6 June 2017 1:36 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

“May you live to be a thousand years old, sir.” Still the most widely unheralded great movie on the books, John Patrick Shanley’s lightweight/profound fable is an unmitigated delight. See Tom Hanks at the end of the first phase of his career plus Meg Ryan in an unacknowledged career highlight. How can a movie be so purposely insubstantial, and yet be ‘heavier’ than a dozen pictures with ‘big things to say?’

Joe Versus the Volcano

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1990 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 97 min. / Street Date June 20, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Lloyd Bridges, Robert Stack, Abe Vigoda,

Dan Hedaya, Barry McGovern, Amanda Plummer, Ossie Davis

Cinematography Stephen Goldblatt

Production Designer Bo Welch

Film Editors Richard Halsey, Kenneth Wannberg

Original Music Georges Delerue

Produced by Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall, Steven Spielberg and Teri Schwartz

Written and Directed by John Patrick Shanley

 

I think I found »

- Glenn Erickson

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Joe Hyams, Longtime Warners Publicity Exec, Dies at 90

31 May 2017 3:44 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Joe Hyams, former Warner Bros. publicity executive who worked with notable names including Clint Eastwood, Barbra Streisand, and Stanley Kubrick, died Wednesday in Los Angeles. He was 90.

Hyams spent more than 40 years at Warners, rising to executive VP of special projects. He worked with Eastwood on all his films from 1971’s “Any Which Way But Loose” through 2004’s “Mystic River” and shepherded the films through film festivals, premieres and awards campaigns.

Eastwood said in a statement, “Joe was an incredibly smart, intuitive and talented executive who played a crucial role in making my movies succeed.  More important, he was a great friend and I will miss him.”

Working with stars such as James Dean, Burt Lancaster, Hillary Swank, and Morgan Freeman, Hyams nurtured personal relationships with many of the stars he worked with, and he served as a mentor and advisor to many people.

“To me he was the dean of what he did, »

- Pat Saperstein

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Joe Hyams Dies: Longtime Warner Bros Publicity Executive Worked With Hollywood Greats

31 May 2017 2:57 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Joe Hyams, the highly respected publicity executive who worked at Warner Bros for more than 40 years, died today. He was 90. Hyams, who had served in the Marines before coming to the entertainment industry, was relied upon by studio heads, filmmakers and celebs going back to the days of John Wayne, James Dean, Burt Lancaster, Stanley Kubrick, François Truffaut and Federico Fellini. But one of the longest-lasting relationships in town was between him and his friend Clint Ea… »

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Jerry Perenchio, Billionaire Media Mogul Behind Univision, Dies at 86

24 May 2017 3:30 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Media mogul A. Jerrold “Jerry” Perenchio, who amassed a fortune by building a powerhouse TV production company and later the Spanish-language network Univision, and was among California’s most prolific philanthropists and political donors, has died. He was 86.

Perenchio died of lung cancer at his Bel Air home on Monday, a family spokesperson told the Los Angeles Times.

His personal wealth, along with an early career managing high-profile stars and promoting major sporting events, belied a fierce determination to stay out of the limelight, in which he granted few interviews and rarely allowed his associates to do the same.

A partner with Norman Lear in the production of such shows as “The Jeffersons” and “One Day at a Time,” Perenchio made a fortune on megahits of the 1970s, particularly from the sale of the shows into syndication.

No media investment, however, was as lucrative for Perenchio as the one in Univision, which »

- Ted Johnson

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Marlene Dietrich Retrospective Screening at the Metrograph in NYC

24 May 2017 2:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Marlene Dietrich in “Shanghai Express”: mptvimages.com/IMDb

If you’re a fan of actress, camp icon, and anti-fascist Marlene Dietrich or want to learn more about her, you’re in luck. The Metrograph theater in New York City is hosting “Marlene,” a retrospective featuring 19 of Dietrich’s films. The festivities kicked off May 23 and will continue until July 8.

Marie Magdalene “Marlene” Dietrich was born in Berlin in 1901. Dietrich began her career as a vaudeville performer in Weimar Germany. She moved to Hollywood and eventually became a revered film actress, “bisexual sex symbol, willful camp icon, [and] paragon of feminine glamour” — “comfortable in top hat and tails, ballgown, or gorilla suit.” But the actress did not forget about what was happening back home in Germany; Dietrich became involved in the fight against fascism during WWII. She “used her likeness to fundraise for Jewish refugees escaping Nazi Germany and performed on Uso tours, earning her the Metal of Freedom and Légion d’honneur by the French government,” the press release details. Dietrich died in 1992 at the age of 90.

The “Marlene” retrospective will feature Dietrich’s seven films with director Josef von Sternberg: “The Blue Angel,” “Morocco,” “Blonde Venus,” “Dishonored,” “Shanghai Express,” “The Devil Is A Woman,” and “The Scarlet Empress.” The actress’ collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock (“Stage Fright”), Orson Welles (“Touch of Evil”), and Billy Wilder (“A Foreign Affair”) are among the other films screening at the Metrograph. A documentary about Dietrich, Maximilian Schell’s “Marlene,” will also screen. All of the films, besides “Marlene,” will be shown in 35mm.

Head over to The Metrograph’s site for showtimes and more information. The featured films and their synopses are below, courtesy of the Metrograph.

Angel

1937 / 91min / 35mm

Director: Ernst Lubitsch

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall, Melvyn Douglas

While English statesman Herbert Marshall worries over international affairs, his glamorous wife (Dietrich) concerns herself with, well, international affairs, beginning a tryst with a dashing stranger (Melvyn Douglas) who she only allows to know her as “Angel.” Dietrich’s last film on her Paramount contract is a spry, surprising love triangle, one of the least-known of Lubitsch’s essential works from his Midas touch period.

Blonde Venus

1932 / 93min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall, Cary Grant

A.k.a “The One with the Gorilla Suit,” which Dietrich dons to perform her big number “Hot Voodoo.” It’s all for a good cause: she’s an ex-nightclub chanteuse who’s gone back to work to pay for husband Herbert Marshall’s radium poisoning treatments, though she later allows herself to become the plaything of Cary Grant’s dashing young millionaire, earning only contempt for her sacrifice.

Der Blaue Engel

1930 / 106min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings, Kurt Gerron, Rosa Valetti

Mild-mannered, uptight schoolteacher Emil Jannings lives a faultlessly law-abiding, by-the-book existence, but it’s all over when he gets a glimpse of Dietrich’s nightclub chanteuse Lola-Lola, and is immediately ready to ruin himself for her amusement. The first collaboration between Dietrich and von Sternberg made her an international star, and linked her forever to her seductive, world-weary delivery of the song “Falling in Love Again.” We’re showing the German-language version, preceded by a four-minute-long Dietrich screen test.

Desire

1936 / 95min / 35mm

Director: Frank Borzage

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, John Halliday, William Frawley

Dietrich and Gary Cooper reunite in this delightful urbane comedy by Borzage, a master of romantic delirium, here working somewhat after the style of producer Ernst Lubitsch. La Dietrich’s stylish jewel thief stashes a clutch of pearls in the pocket of an upstanding American businessman, and while trying to get back the goods she can’t help but notice the big lug isn’t half bad-looking. An excuse to recall the following lines from the 1936 Times review: “Lubitsch, the Gay Emancipator, has freed Dietrich from von Sternberg’s artistic bondage.” Those were the days.

Destry Rides Again

1939 / 94min / 35mm

Director: George Marshall

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, James Stewart, Mischa Auer, Charles Winninger

Jimmy Stewart, still in his rangy, impossibly-good-looking phase, is a marshal who sets out to clean up the wide-open town of Bottleneck without firing a shot in this charming Western musical comedy. The local roughnecks present him one kind of challenge; Dietrich’s saloon singer Frenchy, belting out her rowdy standard “The Boys in the Back Room,” quite another.

The Devil Is A Woman

1935 / 80min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Lionel Atwill, Edward Everett Horton

Dietrich and von Sternberg’s final collaboration, and an apotheosis of sorts. In Spain in the early years of the 20th century, Lionel Atwill’s loyal suitor Pasqualito and the revolutionary Cesar Romero are teased into a frenzy by legendary coquette Concha (Guess who?). The coolly scrolling camera and baroque compositions are courtesy of an uncredited Lucien Ballard and Von Sternberg himself, doing double duty as cinematographer.

Dishonored

1931 / 91min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Victor McLaglen

Dietrich plays X-27, a Mata Hari-esque spy for the Austrian Secret Service tasked with using a bevy of costume changes (Russian peasant, feathered helmet, leather jumpsuit) to gather information on the Russians during World War I. Outrageous plotting, high chiaroscuro style, and the star’s earthy sensuality mark this unforgettable pre-code treasure, beloved by Godard and Fassbinder both. Says Victor McLaglen: “the more you cheat and the more you lie, the more exciting you become.”

A Foreign Affair

1948 / 116min / 35mm

Director: Billy Wilder

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Jean Arthur, John Lund, Millard Mitchell

Against the backdrop of a ruined postwar Berlin, another conflict is just heating up, as Dietrich’s cabaret singer with rumored Nazi ties vies with Jean Arthur’s Iowa congresswoman-on-a-fact-finding-mission for the affection of American officer John Lund. Wilder’s penultimate collaboration with co-writer Charles Brackett is a black comic delight full of crackling, piquant dialogue, and Dietrich’s knowing slow-burn has never been better.

Judgment At Nuremberg

1961 / 186min / 35mm

Director: Stanley Kramer

Cast: Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Marlene Dietrich, Maximilian Schell, Judy Garland, Montgomery Clift, William Shatner

Dietrich’s last truly substantial screen appearance came as part of the ensemble for Kramer’s courtroom drama, playing the widow of a German general executed by the Allies who’s befriended by investigating judge Spencer Tracy in this fictionalized retelling of the events of a 1947 military tribunal addressing war crimes by civilians under the Third Reich. Rounding out the all-star cast are Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Judy Garland, William Shatner, and Maximilian Schell, who would win the Academy Award for Best Actor, and later directed a portrait of Dietrich.

The Lady Is Willing

1942 / 92min / 35mm

Director: Mitchell Leisen

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Fred MacMurray, Aline MacMahon, Stanley Ridges

Leisen, considered a comic talent on-par with Lubitsch during the screwball era, lends characteristic sparkle to this mid-career attempt at reconfiguring Dietrich’s very 1930s star persona to fit the needs of the 1940s women’s picture; here she plays a glamor-gal diva whose life changes when she discovers a baby on Eighth Avenue and decides to adopt, passing through melodramatic coincidences and a vale of tears before falling into the arms of Fred MacMurray.

Lola

1981 / 113min / 35mm

Director: Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Cast: Barbara Sukowa, Armin Mueller-stahl, Mario Adorf, Matthias Fuchs

Dietrich had for all purposes retired from the screen by the time that Fassbinder began his frontal assault on West German popular culture, but her image and her unlikely combination of cool irony and torrid emotion left a profound mark on his films. Lola, the candy-colored, late-1950s-set capstone of his “Brd Trilogy” in particular draws heavily from The Blue Angel, with bordello singer Barbara Sukowa torn between Mario Adorf’s sugar daddy and Armin Mueller-Stahl’s incoming building commissioner in boomtown Coburg.

Marlene

1984 / 94min / Digital

Director: Maximilian Schell

More than twenty years after Schell had co-starred with Dietrich in Judgment at Nuremberg, during which period she’d retired to a life of very private seclusion, he tried to get her to participate in a documentary about her life. She finally gave in — sort of. Dietrich offered only her memories and her famous voice, refusing to appear on camera, but necessity became a boon to the resulting film, a sort of guided tour of Dietrich’s life and work, which simultaneously reveals much and deepens her mystery.

Morocco

1930 / 92min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, Adolphe Menjou

After The Blue Angel, shot in Germany, was a hit, von Sternberg was given full run of the Paramount backlot, where he would conjure up all manner of exotic destinations out of thin air. First stop: North Africa, where French legionnaire Gary Cooper competes with sugar daddy Adolphe Menjou for the favors of Dietrich’s cabaret star Amy Jolly, who in one scene famously rocks a men’s tailcoat and plants a smooch on a female fan.

Rancho Notorious

1952 / 89min / 35mm

Director: Fritz Lang

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Arthur Kennedy, Mel Ferrer, William Frawley

Teutons Lang and Dietrich team up in a Technicolor wild west of deliberate, garish artifice in this singularly claustrophobic oater, in which a revenge-mad Burt Kennedy goes looking for his fiancée’s killers at a hideaway inn run by Dietrich, and discovers dangerous, unbidden desires instead. As the chant of the film’s recurring, persecutorial Brechtian ballad goes: “Hate, murder, and revenge.”

The Scarlet Empress

1934 / 104min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, John Lodge, Sam Jaffe, Louise Dresser

Have ever a screen persona and a historical personage found such a hand-in-glove-fit as did Dietrich and Empress Catherine the Great of Russia? While the Motion Picture Production Code was preparing to chasten American movies, Dietrich and von Sternberg got together to throw one last lavish S & M orgy, a flamboyant film of 18th century palace intrigues and ludicrously lapidary décor.

Shanghai Express

1932 / 82min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Clive Brook, Anna May Wong

“It took more than one man to change my name to Shanghai Lily,” proclaims Marlene Dietrich with the disdain of an empress, though in fact she’s a high-class courtesan, re-encountering former lover Clive Brook on an express train rolling through civil war-wracked China. The fourth of Dietrich and von Sternberg’s collaborations is a riot of delirious chinoiserie artifice and sculpted shadowplay — Dietrich’s co-star Anna May Wong was never again shot so caressingly.

The Song Of Songs

1933 / 90min / 35mm

Director: Rouben Mamoulian

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Brian Aherne, Lionel Atwill

So often the instrument of corruption, Mamoulian’s film allows Dietrich to be the corrupted one, playing a country girl, Lily, who comes to big-city Berlin and quickly becomes the model and muse of sculptor Brian Aherne. Lionel Atwill’s preening decadent Baron von Merzbach admires Lily’s nude form in marble, and decides to bring the original home with him, where she slips into the role of the cynical sophisticate, though her heart remains with the artist.

Stage Fright

1950 / 110min / 35mm

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Jane Wyman, Michael Wilding, Richard Todd, Alastair Sim

Hitchcock’s last film in his native England until 1972’s Frenzy is an audaciously-structured thriller, making use of an extended flashback and a whiplash narrative about-face. Acting student Jane Wyman tries to save beau Robert Todd from taking the fall for a murder committed by stage star Dietrich, who shows her hypnotic charm in a show-stopper performance of “I’m the Laziest Gal in Town.”

Touch Of Evil

1958 / 95min / 35mm

Director: Orson Welles

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Orson Welles

It’s not the size of the part, but what you do with it. Playing a brothel keeper in a seedy border town in Welles’s magnificently baroque late noir, Dietrich only has a clutch of lines, but they’re the ones you remember, whether her famous requiem for crooked cop Hank Quinlan, or her reading of his “fortune”: “Your future’s all used up.” Bold and self-evidently brilliant, you could use Touch of Evil to explain the concept of great cinema to a visiting Martian.

Marlene Dietrich Retrospective Screening at the Metrograph in NYC was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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'The Leopard' TV show in the works

22 May 2017 11:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

English-language version of story that was adapted into 1963 Luchino Visconti film announced.

Italy’s Indiana Production has acquired rights to Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s acclaimed novel The Leopard and is lining up an English-language TV adaptation.

Fabrizio Donvito, Marco Cohen and Benedetto Habib of Indiana Production, Daniel Campos Pavoncelli and Ilaria Castiglioni will produce the chronicle of Sicilian society at the time of Italian unification.

“It will be a saga that retells the story of a country during its most profound changes, which involved the whole of Europe,” Donvito, founding partner at Indiana Production, said.

“As so clearly said in the novel, ‘Everything needs to change, so everything can stay the same.’ I can’t think of a more contemporary phrase to describe the times we currently live in, where some forces want to prevent real and needed changes, and the indecision of a few will weigh on the majority.”

The project »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Dina Merrill, Elegant Actress and Philanthropist, Dies at 93

22 May 2017 9:48 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Dina Merrill, a beautiful, blonde actress with an aristocratic bearing known as much for her wealthy origins, philanthropy, and marriage to actor Cliff Robertson as for her work in film and television, died on Monday at her home in East Hampton, N.Y. She was 93.

Her son, Stanley H. Rumbough, told the New York Times that Merrill had Lewy Body dementia.

Her parents were Post Cereals heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, and her second husband, Wall Street’s E.F. Hutton.

In 1983, on the occasion of Merrill’s musical comedy debut in a revival of Rodgers and Hart’s 1936 musical ”On Your Toes,” the New York Times gushed, “Long regarded as the essence of chic, the epitome of class and such a persuasive purveyor of charm and charity that she could have a rightful claim to fame as an eloquent spokesman — and fund-raiser — for a slew of worthy causes, Miss Merrill »

- Carmel Dagan

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Dina Merrill, Elegant Actress and Philanthropist, Dies at 93

22 May 2017 9:48 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Dina Merrill, a beautiful, blonde actress with an aristocratic bearing known as much for her wealthy origins, philanthropy, and marriage to actor Cliff Robertson as for her work in film and television, died on Monday at her home in East Hampton, N.Y. She was 93.

Her son, Stanley H. Rumbough, told the New York Times that Merrill had Lewy Body dementia.

Her parents were Post Cereals heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, and her second husband, Wall Street’s E.F. Hutton.

In 1983, on the occasion of Merrill’s musical comedy debut in a revival of Rodgers and Hart’s 1936 musical ”On Your Toes,” the New York Times gushed, “Long regarded as the essence of chic, the epitome of class and such a persuasive purveyor of charm and charity that she could have a rightful claim to fame as an eloquent spokesman — and fund-raiser — for a slew of worthy causes, Miss Merrill has evoked instant recognition and elegant associations »

- Carmel Dagan

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‘The Leopard’ to Be Adapted Into English-Language TV Series (Exclusive)

21 May 2017 2:30 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

More than half a century after Claudia Cardinale, Alain Delon and Burt Lancaster strutted down the Cannes red carpet for Luchino Visconti’s “The Leopard,” plans are under way for an English-language TV adaptation of the classic novel by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa.

Italian shingle Indiana Production (“The Leisure Seeker”) has acquired rights to the book in collaboration with Giangiacomo Feltrinelli, its original publisher. They are developing an eight- to 10-episode series being shopped around in Cannes to potential European partners. The project has the full support of Gioacchino Lanza Tomasi, who represents the estate of the late Sicilian author.

English-language writers are being recruited to work on the screenplay in tandem with Italian scribes to guarantee the series’ cultural authenticity.

The plan is for the ambitious project, touted as a high-end historical tapestry with production values on the same scale as “Downton Abbey” or “The Crown,” to go into production in 2019 in several Sicilian locations.

“It »

- Nick Vivarelli

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"I wanted to see real people" by Anne-Katrin Titze

12 May 2017 11:25 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Richard Gere (Norman Oppenheimer) with Lior Ashkenazi (Micha Eshel) at Lanvin: "It's almost like theater."

Star of Joseph Cedar's Footnote and Norman: The Moderate Rise And Tragic Fall Of A New York Fixer, Lior Ashkenazi, spoke with me on growing up seeing Kirk Douglas, Steve McQueen, and Paul Newman movies with his father, Burt Lancaster in Robert Siodmak's The Crimson Pirate being his first, shooting Eytan Fox's Walk On Water at Berlin's Tempelhof airport, meeting Son Of Saul director László Nemes at the Cannes Film Festival, and performing a silent scene with Richard Gere.

Lior's upcoming films include Julie Delpy's My Zoe (with Gemma Arterton, Richard Armitage, Daniel Brühl); Dragos Buliga's The Wanderers (Armand Assante); Eran Riklis's Refuge (Golshifteh Farahani, Neta Riskin), Samuel Maoz's Foxtrot (Sarah Adler), and José Padilha's Entebbe (Rosamund Pike, Brühl), where he portrays Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Southwest Airlines Passenger Arrested After Fistfight on Plane

10 May 2017 8:48 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

One person was arrested after a brawl captured on cell phone video broke out aboard a Southwest Airlines plane in Burbank that had arrived from Dallas, a spokesman from the Burbank police confirms to People.

In an email to People, Sgt. Derek Green tells People that a fistfight broke out between two men as the plane, en route to Oakland after a short layover in Burbank, taxied to the gate.

“Everyone was de-planing then all heck broke loose,” passenger Michael Krause told CBS.

The footage, which was posted to Twitter on Sunday, showed two men fighting as a female passenger »

- Stephanie Petit

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‘Law & Order’ Director, DGA Official Ed Sherin Dies at 87

5 May 2017 3:56 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ed Sherin, who received eight Emmy nominations and won one Emmy for directing and executive producing the series “Law & Order,”  died Thursday in Nova Scotia. He was 87.

In addition to his work on “Law & Order,”  Sherin also directed episodes of “Hill Street Blues,” “Moonlighting,”  “L.A. Law,” “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “Medium.”

Sherin was also active in the Directors Guild of America, including three terms as National Vice President. He  was awarded the  awarded the Robert B. Aldrich Achievement Award in 2002 for service to the DGA and the DGA Honorary Life Member Award in 2012.

Sherin is survived by his wife, actress Jane Alexander, stepson, actor-director Jace Alexander, and three sons.

After attending Brown University, Sherin served in the armed forces during the Korean War. He began acting in theater and television, and eventually discovered that directing was his passion. He received a Drama Desk Award for “The Great White Hope »

- Dave McNary

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‘Law & Order’ Director, DGA Official Ed Sherin Dies at 87

5 May 2017 3:56 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Ed Sherin, who received eight Emmy nominations and won one Emmy for directing and executive producing the series “Law & Order,”  died Thursday in Nova Scotia. He was 87.

In addition to his work on “Law & Order,”  Sherin also directed episodes of “Hill Street Blues,” “Moonlighting,”  “L.A. Law,” “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “Medium.”

Sherin was also active in the Directors Guild of America, including three terms as National Vice President. He  was awarded the  awarded the Robert B. Aldrich Achievement Award in 2002 for service to the DGA and the DGA Honorary Life Member Award in 2012.

Sherin is survived by his wife, actress Jane Alexander, stepson, actor-director Jace Alexander, and three sons.

After attending Brown University, Sherin served in the armed forces during the Korean War. He began acting in theater and television, and eventually discovered that directing was his passion. He received a Drama Desk Award for “The Great White Hope” in 1969 and a Tony nomination for »

- Dave McNary

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Edwin Sherin, Director of 'The Great White Hope' on Broadway and 'Law & Order,' Dies at 87

5 May 2017 3:25 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Edwin Sherin, who directed the original production of James Earl Jones' The Great White Hope to a Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award for best play, died Thursday in Nova Scotia, the Directors Guild of America announced. He was 87.

Sharin graduated from Brown University and later joined the Armed Forces, serving during the Korean War. Following his success in theater, Sherin went on to direct such films as Valdez Is Coming, starring Burt Lancaster, and My Old Man's Place, with Michael Moriarty, both released in 1971.

His television credits include Hill Street Blues, Moonlighting and L.A. Law. Sherin notably also »

- Patrick Shanley

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Edwin Sherin, Director of 'The Great White Hope' on Broadway and 'Law & Order,' Dies at 87

5 May 2017 3:25 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Edwin Sherin, who directed the original production of James Earl Jones' The Great White Hope to a Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award for best play, died Thursday in Nova Scotia, the Directors Guild of America announced. He was 87.

Sharin graduated from Brown University and later joined the Armed Forces, serving during the Korean War. Following his success in theater, Sherin went on to direct such films as Valdez Is Coming, starring Burt Lancaster, and My Old Man's Place, with Michael Moriarty, both released in 1971.

His television credits include Hill Street Blues, Moonlighting and L.A. Law. Sherin notably also »

- Patrick Shanley

Permalink | Report a problem


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