IMDb > Akira Kurosawa > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 60 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Vincent D’Onofrio eyed for The Magnificent Seven villain

6 hours ago | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Vincent D’Onofrio is reportedly in talks for the villain role in the remake of The Magnificent Seven, according to Variety.

D’Onofrio will join Chris Pratt, Ethan Hawke and Denzel Washington in the film, which is being directed by Antoine Fuqua.

The Magnificent Seven is a remake of the 1960 original starring Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen, which was also a remake of the Japanese movie Seven Samurai by Akira Kurosawa.

»

- Thomas Roach

Permalink | Report a problem


'Magnificent Seven' Wants Vincent D'Onofrio as the Villain

17 hours ago | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

MGM is in talks with Vincent D'Onofrio to play the main villain in The Magnificent Seven remake. If his deal is finalized, he will join a cast that includes Denzel Washington, Chris Pratt, Haley Bennett and Ethan Hawke. No details were given about Vincent D'Onofrio's villainous character.

The original Western classic The Magnificent Seven followed seven gunmen who are hired by a Mexican village to protect them from a villainous warlord. Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter, James Coburn and Horst Buchholz starred as the seven, with Eli Wallach playing the villainous Calvera. The original movie was actually a remake of Akira Kurosawa's 1954 Seven Samurai.

Antoine Fuqua is directing from a screenplay by Nic Pizzolatto and John Lee Hancock. MGM will oversee production while Sony Pictures will distribute the remake. Both MGM and Sony will split the production costs. Shooting is expected to begin »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


Vincent D’Onofrio Eyed to Play Villain in ‘Magnificent Seven’ Remake (Exclusive)

20 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Vincent D'Onofrio is in talks to play the villain in MGM and Sony’s “Magnificent Seven” remake starring Denzel Washington.

Chris Pratt and Ethan Hawke are also on board to star with Antoine Fuqua directing.

Sony and MGM are splitting the cost evenly with Sony distributing the pic. MGM will oversee production.

The 1960 film, itself a remake of Akira Kurosawa’s “Seven Samurai,” starred Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. It centered on seven gunslingers who protect an oppressed Mexican village from a group of outlaws.

The script was most recently reworked by John Lee Hancock after “True Detective” creator Nic Pizzolatto wrote the previous draft.

Production is expected to start within the next month as Fuqua assembles the remaining cast.

No stranger to playing the villain, D’Onofrio can next be seen as the antagonist in Universal’s “Jurassic World” and as Marvel Comics bad guy Kingpin in Netflix’s “Daredevil” series. »

- Justin Kroll

Permalink | Report a problem


Janus Films to release restored 'Apu Trilogy'

25 March 2015 2:33 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Janus Films will release new 4K restorations of Satyajit Ray’s seminal The Apu Trilogy with new subtitles.

The company will re-release the trilogy in New York City at Film Forum on May 8 and in Los Angeles at Landmark’s Nuart Theater on May 29 prior to a summer-long rollout in the nation’s art-house theatres.

The Apu Trilogy is based on books by Bibhutibhusan Banerjee and follows a free-spirited child in rural Bengal who matures into an adolescent urban student and finally a sensitive man of the world. 

The films helped bring India into the golden age of international art-house cinema and prompted Akira Kurosawa to say, “Never having seen a Satyajit Ray film is like never having seen the sun or moon.”

Restoration work was deemed impossible after a fire damaged the original negatives in 1993.

The Academy Film Archive salvaged the remains and waited until technological advances allowed it to restore the films.

The Archive »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

Permalink | Report a problem


Restored 'Apu Trilogy' Coming to Theaters in May, Criterion Release Likely to Follow

25 March 2015 2:31 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

One of the most talked about, yet infrequently seen film trilogies of all time has to be Satyajit Ray's The Apu Trilogy -- Pather Panchali (Song Of The Little Road), Aparajito (The Unvanquished) and Apur Sansar (The World Of Apu). You can find poor quality versions on YouTube and purchase shoddy DVD copies on Amazon and eBay, but soon these classics will be available in newly minted restored versions as Janus Film announced today the upcoming $K restoration of all three films will be begin a national re-release in New York City at Film Forum on Friday, May 8 and in Los Angeles at Landmark's Nuart Theater on Friday, May 29, followed by releases in art houses nationwide throughout the summer. Frequently listed as one of the top accomplishments in the history of cinema, the trilogy helped bring India into the golden age of international art-house cinema - but this restoration »

- Brad Brevet

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Video Essay 'Akira Kurosawa — Composing Movement'

24 March 2015 11:48 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

“Can movement tell a story? Sure, if you’re as gifted as Akira Kurosawa. More than any other filmmaker, he had an innate understanding of movement and how to capture it on screen. Join me today in studying the master, possibly the greatest composer of motion in film history.” Lofty words from Tony Zhou at YouTube channel Every Frame a Painting. In this new 8.5 minute analysis of master filmmaker Kurosawa’s work, Zhou breaks down the five primary types of movement Kurosawa employs, and then compares his classics to “flat” modern blockbusters. “A Kurosawa film moves like no one else’s,” the video professes. “Each one is a master class in different types of motion, and also ways to combine them.” So what movements comprise the quintet of motion in a Kurosawa picture Tony discerns? First the study explores the movement of nature. As Tony astutely points out, few Kurosawa »

- Zach Hollwedel

Permalink | Report a problem


Daily | Lola, Kurosawa, Glawogger

23 March 2015 9:31 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

With today's round of essays, the fifth issue of Lola, edited by Adrian Martin and Girish Shambu, is now complete. Among the new additions are pieces on Blade Runner, Claude Lanzmann's The Last of the Unjust and Shane Carruth's Upstream Color. Also in today's roundup: Nadia Awad on Jean-Luc Godard and the evolution of Palestinian filmmaking, Locarno artistic director Carlo Chatrian on Sam Peckinpah, Italo Calvino's memories of cinema-going, celebrations of Akira Kurosawa's 105th birthday, Chris Randle on Dennis Hopper's Catchfire with Jodie Foster, Neil Young and Bob Dylan, Abel Ferrara's war of words with IFC and Wild Bunch, a first viewing of Michael Glawogger's final film—and more. » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem


Daily | Lola, Kurosawa, Glawogger

23 March 2015 9:31 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

With today's round of essays, the fifth issue of Lola, edited by Adrian Martin and Girish Shambu, is now complete. Among the new additions are pieces on Blade Runner, Claude Lanzmann's The Last of the Unjust and Shane Carruth's Upstream Color. Also in today's roundup: Nadia Awad on Jean-Luc Godard and the evolution of Palestinian filmmaking, Locarno artistic director Carlo Chatrian on Sam Peckinpah, Italo Calvino's memories of cinema-going, celebrations of Akira Kurosawa's 105th birthday, Chris Randle on Dennis Hopper's Catchfire with Jodie Foster, Neil Young and Bob Dylan, Abel Ferrara's war of words with IFC and Wild Bunch, a first viewing of Michael Glawogger's final film—and more. » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem


Votd: Akira Kurosawa, master of motion in cinema

23 March 2015 7:33 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

I’ll likely never watch an Akira Kurosawa movie the same way again. Tony Zhou’s Every Frame a Painting video essay series is one of the best on the web, and his latest tackles a true giant in cinema. Though much has been made of Kurosawa’s spectacle in films like Ran, his incredible kinetic action that would define modern action films in Seven Samurai, his clever narrative construction in Rashomon, his operatic storytelling in the Shakespearean adaptation Throne of Blood, or his undying pathos and emotion in Ikiru, one of the unifying threads throughout all Kurosawa’s masterpieces is the movement within each and every frame.

Zhou breaks down how Kurosawa uses natural elements like rain, snow, or wind to create a more sensual and captivating moment. He talks about the exaggerated motions of actors like Toshiro Mifune help illustrate more easily how the character is feeling. And »

- Brian Welk

Permalink | Report a problem


Why Kurosawa Was a Master of Movement

22 March 2015 10:18 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Here’s another masterful film essay by Tony Zhou, this time on Akira Kurosawa’s use of movement in his films. Movement, you ask? Aren’t movies motion pictures and, thus, constructed around movement? Well, as a comparison scene from The Avengers shows, there is movement in the form of listless dolly moves and diffident head tilts, and then there is movement — elegant, multi-point master shots, vibrant background elements like wind and rain, and outsized expressions from actors that can replace pedantic dialogue. I especially like Zhou’s discussion of how Kurosawa cuts from stillness to movement. His appreciation here of Kurosawa has […] »

- Scott Macaulay

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch First Live-Action ‘Attack On Titan’ Teaser

22 March 2015 3:42 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Attack On Titan has taken the anime world by storm with its excellent characters, breathtaking action sequences, and shocking plot twists. Soon, we’ll be relishing the opportunity to experience it all over again, and this time in live-action. From director Shinji Higuchi, who gave us the exceptionally surprising remake of Akira Kurosawa’s Hidden Fortress with Hidden Fortress: The Last Princess, we’ll follow the tale of a world where humans are forced to live behind gigantic walls so as to protect them from human devouring giants. But when a colossal titan arrives, the time for hiding behind walls comes to an end.

The trailer shows very little of quite a lot, with just quick shots of moments fans are sure to recall. The style looks brilliant so far, although due to budgetary constraints, we’re still worried about the finished product. Luckily, we’ve been treated to »

- Luke Ryan Baldock

Permalink | Report a problem


Fandor Hosts Rotating Criterion Collection Films at Hulu Plus

21 March 2015 10:52 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Fandor, the premiere streaming service for independent, classic and critically-acclaimed films, shorts and documentaries, in a partnership with the Criterion Collection and Hulu Plus, is currently home to a rotation of uniquely curated bundles of Criterion films available to watch instantly via desktop, set top and mobile devices.

Every Tuesday, Fandor rolls out a new collection of films that share a common theme, genre, time period, film style, etc. These films are available on the site for 12 days before being replaced by a fresh new batch of featured Criterion masterpieces.

Fandor’S Criterion Picks For March

March 17-28: The Sixteenth Century

Carnival in Flanders(1935, Director Jacques Feyder): A small village in Flanders puts on a carnival to avoid the brutal consequences of the Spanish occupation. Ivan the Terrible(1944, DirectorSergei Eisenstein): As Ivan ascends to lead Russia, the Boyars are determined to disrupt his rule. Ivan’s relationship »

- Robert Greenberger

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: An Exploration of Kurosawa, 'The Avengers' & How to Tell a Story Through Movement

20 March 2015 9:21 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

"If you combine the right motion, and the right emotion, you get something cinematic," says Tony Zhou in his latest installment of "Every Frame a Painting", his video essay series that examines various aspects of filmmaking and breaks down scenes of films to show how filmmakers use things like symmetry, angles, and technology to inform the narratives of their films. Zhou's latest video essay examines how filmmakers use movement to tell a story, and he has chosen Akira Kurosawa as his primary example throughout the essay. Zhou breaks down five different types of movement Kurosawa often used -- the movement of nature, of groups, of individuals, of the camera, and of the cut -- and selects one particular scene from Kurosawa's Seven Samurai to show exactly what he means. The scene uses every one of the five types of movement Zhou highlights, sometimes all at once and sometimes with »

- Jordan Benesh

Permalink | Report a problem


Avengers vs. Akira: A Video Exploration of What Makes Kurosawa a Master of Movement

20 March 2015 8:12 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Akira Kurosawa was unbelievably skilled at portraying movement on screen, and The Avengers are here to illustrate why.

"Avengers vs. Akira: A Video Exploration of What Makes Kurosawa a Master of Movement" was originally published on Film School Rejects for our wonderful readers to enjoy. It is not intended to be reproduced on other websites. If you aren't reading this in your favorite RSS reader or on Film School Rejects, you're being bamboozled. We hope you'll come find us and enjoy the best articles about movies, television and culture right from the source. »

- Scott Beggs

Permalink | Report a problem


Guillermo del Toro to be honoured at San Francisco

19 March 2015 2:59 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Film-maker to receive Irving M. Levin Directing Award at upcoming edition of festival.

Guillermo del Toro will receive this year’s Irving M. Levin Directing Award at the San Francisco International Film Festival.

The Mexican film-maker will be presented with the award at the San Francisco Film Society (Sffs) Awards Night on April 27, and will also be honoured at An Evening with Guillermo del Toro on April 25 with an onstage interview and a screening of The Devil’s Backbone.

Noah Cowan, executive director of Sffs, commented: “This award is a tribute to his boundless imagination and to his deep understanding of cinema history. Del Toro is both a great teacher and a boisterous communicator of why movies matter; we are going to have a very fun night with him here indeed.”

Made possible by Irving’s son and current Sffs board member Fred M. Levin and his wife Nancy Livingston, the award was »

- ian.sandwell@screendaily.com (Ian Sandwell)

Permalink | Report a problem


Den Of Geek Book Club: The Searchers - The Making Of An American Legend

16 March 2015 5:34 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Glenn Frankel's exploration of famous John Ford's Western, The Searchers, is our Den Of Geek Book Club non-fiction choice this month...

John Ford's The Searchers is a film that has had many interpretations placed upon it since it was released in 1956. Some would say it's a plea for tolerance. Others would point out that some scenes contain a less forgiving message. The key element of Glenn Frankel’s book takes a different stance. It starts with surprising fact – that The Searchers is, in fact, based on a true story, taking its inspiration from events that played a huge part in the way settlers viewed Native Americans in the nineteenth century, and beyond.  

The Making Of An American Legend charts the way that truth can become legend, and legend can become film. Of course, John Ford loved these sorts of distinctions; 'When the legend becomes fact, print the legend' »

- louisamellor

Permalink | Report a problem


Film School Club at Film School Rejects is Coming March 26 with Guest Critic Drew McWeeny

13 March 2015 11:47 AM, PDT | The Scorecard Review | See recent Scorecard Review news »

I am Jeff Bayer, and I have not seen every film in the world.

A new column is coming called Film School Club with Jeff Bayer. You have an assignment. Watch Dead Man by Jim Jarmusch. The column discussing the film with Jeff Bayer and guest Drew McWeeny will be available on Thursday, March 26. The film is available on Netflix Instant, and can be rented on iTunes and Amazon.

When I was at the Sundance Film Festival in January, a group of film critics gathered outside to discuss whatever film we all just exited. I said something, I can’t remember exactly what it was, but another film critic, whom I respect, said, “Whatever, you’ve only seen one (Joe) Swanberg film.”

“That’s not true,” I said. “I’ve seen two*.” There was a little laughter from the group, I think partially at my expense.

His comment stuck with me. »

- Jeff Bayer

Permalink | Report a problem


La Happenings: Celebrate Kurosawa's Birthday With Screenings At The Crest

13 March 2015 11:30 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

World-renowned filmmaker Kurosawa Akira was born March 23, 1910. To celebrate what would have been his 105th birthday (he passed away in 1998), The Crest Westwood movie palace are hosting Sunday screenings of some bonafide classics. Coming up this Sunday, March 15, it's High and Low, Kurosawa's kidnapping-noir epic that gets deep into class politics without ever losing its hard-boiled edge.The following Sundays see his jidai-geki touchstones take to the big screen: On March 22, Mifune Toshiro stars as Yojimbo, while Seven Samurai screens on March 29.Full details, including the purchase of tickets, can be found on the venue's calendar. ...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

Permalink | Report a problem


Sony, MGM Partner Up for ‘Magnificent Seven’ Remake (Exclusive)

12 March 2015 11:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Sony Pictures has come on to co-finance “The Magnificent Seven” with MGM, sources tell Variety.

Sony and MGM are splitting the cost evenly between the two with Sony distributing the pic. MGM will oversee production.

The film stars Denzel Washington, Chris Pratt, Ethan Hawke and Haley Bennett. Antoine Fuqua is on board to direct.

The 1960 film, a remake of Akira Kurosawa’s “Seven Samurai,” starred Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. It centered on seven gunslingers who protect an oppressed Mexican village from a group of outlaws.

The script was most recently reworked by John Lee Hancock after “True Detective” creator Nic Pizzolatto wrote the previous draft.

Production is expected to start within the next month as Fuqua assembles the remaining cast members.

Sony and MGM had success partnering on the James Bond and “Jump Street” franchises. Their most recent collaboration, “22 Jump Street,” brought in $320 million worldwide and more than $190 million domestically. »

- Justin Kroll

Permalink | Report a problem


5 New Filmmakers You Should Know From First Time Fest

11 March 2015 9:34 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The First Time Film Festival is a great place to catch the debuts of budding auteurs, so years down the road you can tell your friends you know about them before they were cool. More importantly, it provides the rare opportunity to see early offerings from filmmakers still in the embryonic stages of their careers. It's easy cut down artists if their early work isn't great — Kurosawa didn't have his breakthrough, "Rashomon," until he'd already made nine lesser efforts. The following films show great promise for their creators, and hopefully will spur successful careers. Read More: How Do You Celebrate First-Time Filmmakers? First-Time Fest Has the Answer "I Believe in Unicorns" Directed by Leah Meyerhoff "A self portrait should be raw, naked…no, wait, don't bring in naked pictures of yourself. Unless that's how you see yourself, but don't tell your parents I said that." This, an assignment from a lackadaisical high school English teacher, »

- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 60 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners