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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 50 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


I Can't Get Excited for This Just Yet

14 hours ago | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

I honestly think Akira Kurosawa's Throne of Blood is the only film adaptation of William Shakespeare's "Macbeth" that I've seen. I haven't seen Orson Welles' version, nor Roman Polanski's, but I'll surely check out Justin Kurzel's new adaptation once it arrives, and I have to suspect it will have its first official peek out in September in either Toronto or Venice. Today a couple of first look pictures from the film, featuring Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard as Macbeth and "Lady M" have arrived courtesy of The Daily Mail's set visit report. My only concern is the language. Shakespeare's verse remains in the film, though it has apparently been "edited" according to The Daily Mail's Baz Bamigboye, quoting Fassbender who says, "There's a vibrancy and intelligence to the script." It's always tough to get the tone of a film right when it comes to Shakespeare's »

- Brad Brevet

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Michael Fassbender And Marion Cotillard Prepare For Murder In First Images from Macbeth

15 hours ago | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

William Shakespeare’s tragedy Macbeth has seen several terrific big-screen versions, tackled by directors as esteemed as Orson Welles, Roman Polanski and Akira Kurosawa. The tale of murder and paranoia, featuring one of the most maniacal female villains in all of literature (Lady Macbeth), is a work that continues to inspire and influence storytelling to this day. In fact, many culture commentators have noted that the relationship between Frank and Claire Underwood on House of Cards has shades of the power-hungry, conniving characters from Shakespeare’s classic.

Now, a new film adaptation of the beloved tragedy is set to hit theatres either later this year or early in 2015, with Michael Fassbender as Macbeth and Marion Cotillard as Lady Macbeth. The first photos of the adaptation have arrived online today (you can find them above and below) and they indicate just how dark and depraved director Justin Kerzel (Snowtown) is going with the already macabre material. »

- Jordan Adler

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5 Horror Films Criterion Should Release on Blu-ray

13 April 2014 9:04 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Like many film enthusiasts, I love the Criterion Collection. I scoff at some of their selections—I won’t name names—but for the most part, I anticipate new releases with excitement and glee (June’s slate is particularly amazing). Of course, due to lack of finances, I can’t buy as many as I would like – though someday, I will own the entire collection, despite the current economy offering little to no financial opportunity for an individual with my interests and skill set, but I digress.

I do, however, have a minor beef with Criterion.  While admiring most of their titles, I’d love to see more emphasis on genre stuff—especially horror.  And don’t get me wrong, Criterion boasts some excellent titles—Carnival of Lost Souls, Sisters, The Vanishing, Godzilla, The Devil’s Backbone, Repulsion, plus the highly anticipated release of Scanners being not far off—but they need more. »

- Griffin Bell

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What I Watched, What You Watched #240

13 April 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

So, last week I watched the Keanu Reeves abomination that was 47 Ronin and this week I took it upon myself to watch the 1941 original, The 47 Ronin, available on Hulu Plus and it's rather astonishing the differences between the two. Of course, the original doesn't have magic, monsters or the Reeves character and those are the immediate differences, but what's even more fascinating is to compare the way the two films approach the story and what is considered important. The first difference is in the approach to the story. Even though the '41 film runs 223, versus the 118 minutes that make up the 2013 remake, it wastes no time getting started. A little on screen text and immediately we see Lord Asano attack the court official Kira Yoshinaka. Due to the injection of Reeves' character into the remake it takes forever to get to this moment and by that time it's already »

- Brad Brevet

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‘Yojimbo’ is supreme entertainment under the guidance of the sensei Kurosawa

12 April 2014 3:00 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Yojimbo

Written by Ryuzo Kikushima and Akira Kurosawa

Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Japan, 1961

It is the mid 19th century in Japan as a wandering ronin (the term designated to samurai who no longer have a master to follow), Kuwabatake Sanjuro (Toshiro Mifune), roams the windy, autumnal countryside, unsure as to the direction he should head next in search for food and money. Gambling on one particular route takes him to a small town awash in corruption and gamesmanship between two warring factions, one commandeered by Seibi (Seizaburo Kawazu) and the other by Ushitora (Kyu Sazanka). Each has associated themselves with one of the two major industries the sullen town calls its own, a sake brewery run by Tokuemon (Takashi Shimura) and a silk factory owned by Tazaemon (Katamari Fujirawa). Despite the consternation and warnings of a local tavern owner, Goji (Eijiro Tono), the ronin sees a window of glorious opportunity »

- Edgar Chaput

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Museum of Moving Image to Hold First U.S. Kenji Mizoguchi Retrospective in Twenty Years

11 April 2014 9:05 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Along with Akira Kurosawa and Yasujiro Ozu, Kenji Mizoguchi was one of the greatest Japanese filmmakers of his era, but as respected and beloved as he is, he's sometimes overshadowed by the other two masters. The Museum of the Moving Image now presents an opportunity for Mizoguchi devotees and newcomers alike to correct this with the director's first retrospective in the U.S. in twenty years. "Mizoguchi" will present all 30 of the master filmmaker's surviving films (out of the 85 he made in total), from the established classics to rarely-seen early works. As an added bonus, all films will be shown on celluloid, with most on 35mm but some in rare 16mm prints. In partnership with the Japan Foundation and the National Film Center in Tokyo, many of these archival prints have been imported from Japan.  Mizoguchi was a master of mise-en-scene and extended takes great enough to rival Max Ophuls or Jean Renoir, »

- Max O'Connell

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Stand Alone with Michael Moore

7 April 2014 6:30 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Michael Moore at First Time Fest Stand Alone: "And the other film I saw at that time was a film made with Barbie Dolls. It's called Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Michael Moore in a seated Stand Alone with Director of Programming David Schwartz discussed how he got into filmmaking through his immersion in the cinema of Akira Kurosawa, Ingmar Bergman, François Truffaut, Federico Fellini and sneaking in to see Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange.

David Schwartz to Michael Moore: "And Kubrick? You said Clockwork Orange was a favorite." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

This year's First Time Fest First Exposure series includes Julie Taymor's Titus, starring Anthony Hopkins, Jessica Lange, Alan Cumming - Salesman directed by Charlotte Zwerin, Albert and David Maysles - James Toback's Fingers starring Harvey Keitel - David Lynch's Eraserhead with Dp Frederick Elmes in person - Kelly Reichardt's River Of Grass »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Blue Is The Warmest Color, A Brief History Of Time, and The Hidden Fortress Criterion Blu-ray Reviews

7 April 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Criterion has recently released Cannes Palme d’Or winner Blue Is the Warmest Color, Errol MorrisA Brief History of Time, and Akira Kurosawa’s The Hidden Fortress on Blu-ray.  What do these films have in common? Absolutely nothing.  My review of all three on Blu-ray follows after the jump.   Abdellatif Kechiche’s Blue is the Warmest Color starts by introducing Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos) as she beings to explore her sexuality.  The girls she’s friends with tell her that a boy is cute, so she decides to have sex with him, while another girl seems to intimate that they could fool around.  That Sapphic encounter doesn’t work out, but she does run across Emma (Léa Seydoux), first in a chance encounter, and a second time at a lesbian bar.  Then the two begin dating, something that Adèle keeps from her classmates (at first) and her parents.  Emma is a painter, »

- Andre Dellamorte

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How Dp Daniel Landin Captured Scarlett Johansson's Alien Nature in 'Under The Skin'

2 April 2014 8:25 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

British cinematographer Daniel Landin first met director Jonathan Glazer when he did a one day pick-up shoot on "Sexy Beast." Since then, the two have collaborated on various projects, mostly commercials. Over the years, the two continued to talk about Glazer's planned adaptation of "Under the Skin" based on the novel by Michael Faber. Inspired by the films of Akira Kurosawa and Andrei Tarkofsky, in particular "Rashoman" and "Andrei Rublev," respectively, Landin and Glazer eventually collaborated to create a startlingly real and yet wholly foreign environment for Scarlett Johansson's mysterious and predatory character in "Under the Skin." We recently spoke with Landin -- who has worked as a lighting designer for Alexander McQueen's fashion shows and as a Dp for music videos for Radiohead, Robbie Williams, Madonna and others -- about the unique challenges he faced in bringing Glazer's vision to the screen, including working with existing light sources, »

- Paula Bernstein

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Akira Kurosawa – ‘Ran’ (1985)

1 April 2014 10:42 AM, PDT | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Mark Pinkert

Contributor

* * *

Why do tragedy and human suffering inspire the best works of art? In literature, words of pain always seem to carry more weight than words of the same measure of joy: it is as though the absolute values of the sentiments are not equal. “Torment” surpasses “comfort,” “malady” surpasses “good health”–at least aesthetically. (Or maybe in the human condition, as well?) Shakespeare’s tragedies and histories transcend his comedies, and the best music is blue.

The proof of this concept in movies is Akira Kurosawa‘s Ran (1985), which is one of the most beautiful film I’ve ever seen. It takes place on Japan’s lush, rolling hills, which Kurosawa shoots to majesty and grandeur. The film has no miniature sets nor optical illusions: the first two castles of the film are real and famous landmarks in Japan–the Kumamoto and Himeji castles–and the »

- Mark Pinkert

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Watch: George Lucas Talks The Mastery Of Akira Kurosawa For The Criterion Collection

28 March 2014 11:45 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

He never won an Oscar, but Akira Kurosawa's body of work is more of legacy than any golden statue could hope to represent. And it's not a shock that even today, filmmakers revere his films and frankly, his genius, with awe and total respect. And one of the filmmaker's biggest advocates is George Lucas. The filmmaker pop ups in the special features for The Criterion Collection edition of "The Hidden Fortress"—recently upgraded to Blu-ray—and the boutique label has shared some of that online. The two-minute clip finds Lucas sharing how he discovered the filmmaker (props to John Milius) and what Kurosawa's work meant to him. It's sort of amusing to see Lucas downplay "The Hidden Fortress" when it has long been regarded as a major influence on "Star Wars." Anyway, watch below and for more Kurosawa be sure to watch Alex Cox's 1999 documentary "Kurosawa: The Last Emperor »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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New on Video: ‘The Hidden Fortress’

27 March 2014 9:20 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Hidden Fortress

Written by Ryûzô Kikushima, Hideo Oguni, Shinobu Hashimoto, and Akira Kurosawa

Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Japan, 1958

By the time Akira Kurosawa’s The Hidden Fortress was released in 1958, it was more or less settled that the Japanese filmmaker — the only Japanese filmmaker most average moviegoers had heard of at that point — was among the world’s best. This was after Rashomon, after Ikiru, and after The Seven Samurai. Kurosawa’s talent was beyond question, and his global cinematic prominence was growing. However, his last three films, while positively received by critics, did not do so well with audiences. He needed something that would combine quality with commercial success. “A truly good movie is really enjoyable, too,” he once said. “There’s nothing complicated about it.” He would meet this condition with The Hidden Fortress, out now on a new Criterion Collection Blu-ray/DVD combo. While not containing the narrative innovation, »

- Jeremy Carr

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The Noteworthy: Senses #70, "Cinema and Time", Bordwell on Farber

26 March 2014 9:07 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: an excerpt from a video interview with Ramon Zürcher, the co-director of The Strange Little Cat. Head on over to The Seventh Art to check out all the other content from the newly released Issue #19. The most surprising news item in the past week is surely the announcement that Pablo Larrain (No) will be helming a remake of Scarface. Too bewildered to offer an opinion on this, so let's wait and see what develops... Omnibus films are inherently a mixed bag but we'll be keeping our eyes out for this soccer-related project that has such names attached to it as Vincent Gallo and Apichatpong Weerasethakul. Above: issue 70 of Senses of Cinema is now online, and includes an excerpt from a forthcoming English translation of Federico Fellini's 1980 book Making a Film:

"From the day I was born to the first time I set foot in Cinecittà, it seems as »

- Adam Cook

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Asia-Euro Producer finalists revealed

25 March 2014 5:01 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Finalists include five from Asia and five from Europe.

The 6th Ties That Bind: Asia - Europe Producers Workshop has announced ten finalists for this year – five from Asia and five from Europe.

The producers will work together on developing their projects over two events.

The first will take place during the Udine Far East Film Festival in Italy, April 29-May 3. The second, during the Busan International Film Festival (Oct 2-11).

Here are the finalists (further details below):

Karim Aitouna (France)

Women of the Weeping River, Hautlesmains Productions

Dir: Sheron Dayoc

Joenathann Alandy (Philippines)

Hypothalamus, Outpost Visual Frontier

Dir: Dwein Baltazar

Valérie Bournonville (Belgium)

Walkers, Tarantula

Dir: Olivier Meys

Weronika Czołnowska (Poland)

Baby, EasyBusyProductions

Dir: Kei Ishikawa

Antonin Dedet (France)

Black Stones, Neon Productions

Dir: Gyeong Tae Roh

Justin Deimen (Singapore)

Lanun, Silver Media Group

Dir: Chua Jingdu

Julius Ponten (Netherlands) 

Fatu Adil, Habbekrats

Dir: Jim Taihuttu

Alina Yan Qui (China)

Mazu, Guardian of the »

- hjnoh2007@gmail.com (Jean Noh)

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Asia-Euro Producers Workshop unveils finalists

25 March 2014 5:01 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Finalists include five from Asia and five from Europe.

The 6th Ties That Bind: Asia - Europe Producers Workshop has announced ten finalists for this year – five from Asia and five from Europe.

The producers will work together on developing their projects over two events.

The first will take place during the Udine Far East Film Festival in Italy, April 29-May 3. The second, during the Busan International Film Festival (Oct 2-11).

Here are the finalists (further details below):

Karim Aitouna (France)

Women of the Weeping River, Hautlesmains Productions

Dir: Sheron Dayoc

Joenathann Alandy (Philippines)

Hypothalamus, Outpost Visual Frontier

Dir: Dwein Baltazar

Valérie Bournonville (Belgium)

Walkers, Tarantula

Dir: Olivier Meys

Weronika Czołnowska (Poland)

Baby, EasyBusyProductions

Dir: Kei Ishikawa

Antonin Dedet (France)

Black Stones, Neon Productions

Dir: Gyeong Tae Roh

Justin Deimen (Singapore)

Lanun, Silver Media Group

Dir: Chua Jingdu

Julius Ponten (Netherlands) 

Fatu Adil, Habbekrats

Dir: Jim Taihuttu

Alina Yan Qui (China)

Mazu, Guardian of the »

- hjnoh2007@gmail.com (Jean Noh)

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5 Unlikely Pop Culture Influences On Nintendo Games

24 March 2014 11:51 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Nintendo

In 2014 the generations that grew up on video games, Nicktoons, and even first generation Pokemon are now of age and looking back upon their more innocent years with a new perspective. Most pop culture references, homages, and borrowed tropes flew over our heads back in the day; for example were we aware that the Squeaky Boots episode of SpongeBob SquarePants was in fact one big Edgar Allan Poe reference? That A Bug’s Life was essentially Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai…with bugs? Or how about the constant pop culture references batted over our heads in Earthbound?

Nintendo games were the lynchpin of many of our collective childhoods; no matter what time period over the past twenty five years you were born, you probably have a Nintendo game console to identify with (okay, maybe you were into Sega or PlayStation, but play along). And while we were just dumb, »

- Douglas McCausland

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The Hidden Fortress

20 March 2014 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Combining brilliant action sequences (filmed for the first time in sumptuous widescreen black and white Tohoscope) with fanciful characters out of a Japanese storybook, Akira Kurosawa’s 1958 “chambara” (sword fighting) comic-adventure deserves to be remembered for much more than simply its inspiration for the plot of Star Wars. Starring the irreplaceable Toshiro Mifune as the heroic samurai and Misa Uehara as the feisty princess in disguise. Kurosawa won Best Director at that year’s Berlin Film Festival. The 137 minute original was cut to 90 minutes for its 1962 Us release, since restored.

The post The Hidden Fortress appeared first on Trailers From Hell.

»

- TFH Team

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Criterion Collection: The Hidden Fortress | Blu-ray Review

18 March 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Criterion re-releases Akira Kurosawa’s 1958 adventure The Hidden Fortress for a ravishing blu-ray update this month, following hot on the heels of a similar refurbishing for Throne of Blood (1957). Long hailed as a “primary” influence on George LucasStar Wars, there are indeed notable structural similarities, but they’re quite superficial, as those attracted to the title based on this tidbit alone should take note. An entertaining adventure comedy that utilized widescreen technology to breathtaking effect (and represents Kurosawa’s first time using Toho Scope), it’s an impressively structured endeavor on its own, and was actually the first substantial hit for Kurosawa since 1954’s Seven Samurai.

At its core a re-dressed version of The Prince and the Pauper, two peasants in war torn feudal Japan, Tahei (Minoru Chiaki) and Matakishi (Kamatari Fujiwara) escape as prisoners of war and attempt to make their way back home to their own province. »

- Nicholas Bell

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'Frozen', 'American Hustle', 'Hidden Fortress', 'Mandela' & More on DVD & Blu-ray This Week

18 March 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Frozen I wonder if Disney is kicking themselves for already bringing Frozen home to DVD and Blu-ray as it was still in the weekend box office top ten just this past weekend and has now made $1.026 billion worldwide, dipping only fractions from one weekend to the next. Of course, perhaps the formula for a successful film is to rush to the home video market while it's the losers that should allow some time for them to be forgotten before rushing into the hands of consumers that weren't interested enough to check it out on the big screen. Either way, I'm sure this thing is going to make big bucks on home video. The question now is to wonder just how long until they announce Frozen 2.

The Hidden Fortress (Criterion Collection) I've already reviewed Criterion's new Blu-ray presentation of Akira Kurosawa's The Hidden Fortress (read that here). It was only »

- Brad Brevet

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Mondo Offers Posters for ‘Frozen,’ ‘American Hustle,’ and ‘The Hidden Fortress’

17 March 2014 5:30 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

There’s no more unrelated group of films than Disney’s Frozen, David O. Russell’s American Hustle, and Akira Kurosawa’s The Hidden Fortress. But all three hit Blu-ray this week and Mondo is tying them together in another way by announcing posters for all three at the same time.  Below, check out Tom Whalen‘s Frozen, Matt Taylor‘s […]

The post Mondo Offers Posters for ‘Frozen,’ ‘American Hustle,’ and ‘The Hidden Fortress’ appeared first on /Film. »

- Russ Fischer

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 50 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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