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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998

1-20 of 344 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


15 Under-the-Radar Highlights at the 55th New York Film Festival

14 hours ago | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Considering the esteemed level of curation at the New York Film Festival, which begins this Thursday at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, a comprehensive preview could mostly consist of the schedule.

There’s the gala slots (Last Flag Flying, Wonderstruck, and Wonder Wheel), Main Slate selections (featuring Call Me By Your Name, Lady Bird, The Square, Mudbound), two films from Film Twitter phenom Hong Sang-soo, and much more, as well as a 24-film Robert Mitchum retrospective and a delectable line-up of restorations.

So rather than single all of these out for our yearly preview, we’re looking at a handful of under-the-radar highlights from across the festival. Check them out below and return for our coverage.

Before We Vanish (Kiyoshi Kurosawa)

There are few directors who would choose to take a semi-sincere approach to a lengthy pseudo-philosophical science-fiction film — especially not one that lightly pries into our fundamental psychological »

- The Film Stage

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‘Gerald’s Game’ Review: Kinky Sex Goes Wrong, but It’s Stephen King Done Right

24 September 2017 7:42 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“It” and “The Dark Tower” have the highest profiles in a year of Stephen King adaptations, but “Gerald’s Game” best demonstrates the paradoxical nature of bringing his work to the screen. The master of pulpy horror tends to go long on prose, burrowing so deep inside his characters’ psyches that the stories often lose their way. That storytelling gamble is perfectly illustrated by “Gerald’s Game,” in which a woman’s chained to a bed in a kinky sex game gone wrong, wandering the contours of her own mind. How do you make a movie out of that? Director Mike Flanagan figured it out.

It takes a specific kind of filmmaker to tackle the challenges of a single-set survival movie, whether it’s Danny Boyle in a canyon (“127 Hours”) or Rodrigo Cortés inside a coffin (“Buried”), but the closest cinematic comparison to “Gerald’s Game” is James Wan’s “Saw, »

- Eric Kohn

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Film Review: ‘Boston’

21 September 2017 4:23 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The resiliency of the Boston Marathon, both historically and in the wake of the 2013 terrorist bombing at its finish line, is roundly celebrated in “Boston,” whose title directly suggests the fundamental relationship shared between the race and its city. Breaking little ground but functioning as a handy primer on the event’s century-plus ups and downs, as well as its efforts to rebound from the tragedy that befell it four years earlier, Jon Dunham’s documentary gracefully achieves its admirable ends. Whether seen in L.A. theaters when it screens Sept. 22 or later at home, it’s a worthy tribute bound to illuminate and inspire.

The doc begins with race director Dave McGillivray, local officials and former champions discussing the importance — and logistical organizational hurdles — of the 2014 iteration. The need to safeguard participants and spectators predictably proves to be of primary importance, although Dunham’s film isn’t really interested in the nitty-gritty of how those ends »

- Nick Schager

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Matt Damon to Receive BAFTA Britannia Award As He Enters Oscar Season With Two Bold, Divisive Roles

20 September 2017 2:13 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Matt Damon is one of Hollywood’s biggest stars, and a superb actor. This fall audiences anticipate his return in two high-profile award-season movies. He plays a rather nasty character in “Suburbicon,” a film noir ’50s dramedy adapted from a Coen brothers script and directed by George Clooney, Damon’s old chum and “Oceans” co-star. And he’s a goofy sad sack in “Downsizing,” a future-world sci-fi comedy with an ecological message from Oscar perennial Alexander Payne, in which he becomes 5 inches tall to save the environment.

It makes perfect sense for BAFTA to present Damon with a well-deserved award — the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film — at the Britannia Awards October 27 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. After all, he won an Oscar in 1997 with buddy Ben Affleck for writing “Good Will Hunting,” and was nominated for his performances in that movie as well as “Invictus” and “The Martian, »

- Anne Thompson

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Matt Damon to Receive BAFTA Britannia Award As He Enters Oscar Season With Two Bold, Divisive Roles

20 September 2017 2:13 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Matt Damon is one of Hollywood’s biggest stars, and a superb actor. This fall audiences anticipate his return in two high-profile award-season movies. He plays a rather nasty character in “Suburbicon,” a film noir ’50s dramedy adapted from a Coen brothers script and directed by George Clooney, Damon’s old chum and “Oceans” co-star. And he’s a goofy sad sack in “Downsizing,” a future-world sci-fi comedy with an ecological message from Oscar perennial Alexander Payne, in which he becomes 5 inches tall to save the environment.

It makes perfect sense for BAFTA to present Damon with a well-deserved award — the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film — at the Britannia Awards October 27 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. After all, he won an Oscar in 1997 with buddy Ben Affleck for writing “Good Will Hunting,” and was nominated for his performances in that movie as well as “Invictus” and “The Martian, »

- Anne Thompson

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Matt Damon to Receive Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award

20 September 2017 12:12 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts Los Angeles announced on Wednesday that Matt Damon will be the recipient of the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film at this year’s ceremony.

Matt Damon is undoubtedly one of the most talented and respected actors working in film today,” said BAFTA Los Angeles chairman Kieran Breen. “Having made a remarkable impact at a young age with ‘Good Will Hunting,’ he has developed a phenomenal career — combining both big-budget studio movies and acclaimed independent films. As a favorite of some of the top contemporary directors in our industry, it seems particularly fitting that we are honoring his career with an award bearing the name of the legendary Stanley Kubrick.”

Related

Matt Damon to Star as Con-Man Doctor in ‘Charlatan’ (Exclusive)

The Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award is given to individuals “upon whose work is stamped the indelible mark of authorship and commitment, and »

- Matt Fernandez

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Matt Damon To Receive Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award From BAFTA La

20 September 2017 11:23 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

BAFTA La has set Matt Damon as the recipient of its Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film. Presented by Newegg, the prize is given to “a unique individual, upon whose work is stamped the indelible mark of authorship and commitment, and who has lifted the craft to new heights,” BAFTA said. Damon joins this year’s previously announced honorees Dick Van Dyke, Ava DuVernay, Claire Foy and Kenneth Branagh. The Britannia Awards will be handed out October 27 at… »

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Matt Damon to Receive Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award

20 September 2017 9:20 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Matt Damon soon will have a piece of Stanley Kubrick on his mantle. The actor-writer-producer has been tapped to receive the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Los Angeles.

Damon will take the stage at the event, as will previously announced honorees Dick Van Dyke, Ava DuVernay, Claire Foy and Kenneth Branagh. Hosted by British comedian Jack Whitehall, the awards ceremony, sponsored by title sponsor Amd and presenting sponsors American Airlines and Jaguar Land Rover, is set to be held Oct. 27 at the Beverly Hilton.

In making the »

- Chris Gardner

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10 Best Stephen King Movies So Far

19 September 2017 2:25 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

It stormed the box office in September 2017, smashing box office records, pleasing critics, and quickly washing away the bad taste of so many poorly wrought Stephen King adaptations like the current of a suburban neighborhood sewer. Move over Ernest Hemmingway! Beat it Dr. Seuss! The Stephen King adaptation is a hot commodity in Hollywood once again.

Sure, those aforementioned authors have had their books adapted less than half as many times as the works of Stephen King. With so many adapted works from the same prolific storyteller, many of them are sure to be bad. And that is the case with Stephen King. If you grew up in the 80s, you might even remember that a Stephen King movie was not anticipated with the kind of must-see attitude of today's audiences. Many laughed off the notion, believing that if it was a Stephen King movie, it must be bad.

But as It reminded audiences, »

- MovieWeb

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Insights: Rebuilding The Movie Business For A Tech-Filled Future

15 September 2017 12:57 PM, PDT | Tubefilter.com | See recent Tubefilter News news »

When Douglas Trumbull was a boy, he fell in love with Cinerama, the ultra-widescreen film format that was briefly popular after WWII. Fast forward to 1968, when Trumbull went wide again, creating visual effects for Stanley Kubrick’s trippy sci-fi classic 2001: A Space Odyssey.

“I thought, ‘This is great. I want to be in the movie business,’” Trumbull said. The artistic possibilities of creating in wide-screen formats like Cinerama and Kubrick’s films promised a near-magical immersive experience for audiences that was unique to cinema. But then the movie business got “smart.”

To maximize revenues, studios and exhibitors created digitally shot and projected movies that could run in newly reconfigured collections of small rooms called multiplexes, as well as on subsequent distribution windows such as broadcast TV, mobile, and online outlets. The result, to Trumbull’s mind: a loss of the fundamental, near-magical experience that a widescreen, high-quality movie shot on high-resolution film could provide. »

- David Bloom

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It Nearly Featured Appearances By Other ’80s Horror Icons

12 September 2017 10:41 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Despite being a lifelong lover of horror, not even I could have foreseen the massive amount of success currently being enjoyed by It. But, then again, I guess living up to all that hype by garnering critical acclaim and having good word of mouth to go along with it certainly helped with achieving an impressive $123 million dollar opening weekend. Seriously, numbers like that are pretty much unheard of for this genre and have breathed new life into a mostly stagnant box office year.

Quite obviously, Pennywise, the film’s chief antagonist, is most notably known to take on the form of a clown, which the marketing was largely centered on. However, it’s also been well established that he’s a shapeshifter able to take on the guise of someone’s specific fears, as was seen in the much lauded remake.

In Stephen King’s original novel, though, Pennywise also »

- Eric Joseph

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Report: Daily Dead Tours The Shining and Insidious: Beyond The Further Mazes at Halloween Horror Nights in Hollywood

11 September 2017 5:24 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

If you’ve ever attended Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Hollywood, then you know that John Murdy, Chris Williams, and their entire team have turned haunted attractions into something of an art form over the last 19 years. The lineup for Hhn 2017 is wickedly impressive, with seven mazes, a Terror Tram hosted by Chucky that also features several other horror icons, a handful of intense Scare Zones scattered throughout Universal Studios, and a brand new Jabbawockeez show to boot.

Recently, Daily Dead had the opportunity to tour two of the upcoming mazes—The Shining and Insidious: Beyond the Further—that attendees will have a chance to see for themselves when Hhn opens in SoCal on Friday, September 15th, as Murdy took us through all the intricacies that went into bringing these attractions to life for this year’s haunt season.

Murdy’s tour began with taking us inside the latest Insidious maze, »

- Heather Wixson

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A 17-Year-Old Stanley Kubrick’s Photos Of 1940s New York

11 September 2017 4:00 PM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

Stanley Kubrick was a lot of things. He was hard to work with, he wasn’t always easy to agree with, and he was kind of a pushy guy when it came to getting his way. But he was also a brilliant director with a unique vision that was his from a young age. He looked at things and people in a different light than most of us realize is possible and brought that vision forward in a way that some people didn’t fully understand until it was explained to them. In these photos you’ll find a vision of Kubrick’s that

A 17-Year-Old Stanley Kubrick’s Photos Of 1940s New York »

- Wake

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Stephen King on ‘It’ Monster Opening: ‘We Blew the Roof Off the Box Office’

11 September 2017 2:06 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

If moviegoers were waiting for a thumbs up from Stephen King before checking out the new big screen adaptation of his novel “It,” he just gave it. “We blew the roof off the box office with It over the weekend. Thanks to all of you who went out to see it,” the King of Horror tweeted. King isn’t always so enthusiastic about his film adaptations — he famously despised Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of “The Shining,” for example. But “It” lived up to his vision. Also Read: 'It' Scores Monster $123 Million in Final Opening Weekend Box Office Tally We blew the roof off. »

- Rosemary Rossi

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Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Joan Chemla — “If You Saw His Heart”

11 September 2017 9:31 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

“If You Saw His Heart”

Joan Chemla is a director who decided to dedicate herself to filmmaking after an initial stint in law. She has helmed three short films: “Mauvaise Route,” “Dr Nazi,” and “The Man with the Golden Brain.” “If You Saw His Heart,” starring Gael García Bernal and Marine Vacth, is her first feature film. It was workshopped at Tiff’s Talent Lab several years ago and will compete in the Platform Section.

“If You Saw His Heart” will premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 12.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Jc: “Lonely people in a troubled word.” That’s the Tiff’s description, not mine. But I think it captures it nicely.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Jc: Three things: Guillermo Rosales’ book “Boarding Home,” which is at the same time tragic, absurd, romantic, lyrical, and shot through with black humor. The certitude that Gael García Bernal [who plays Daniel] was my hero. And lastly, Marine Vacth, with whom I’d worked four years ago on one of my short films, “The Man with the Golden Brain.”

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Jc: That this film is like no other.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Jc: To make a film that was radical, uncompromising, and on a par with my ambitions. To hold fast and to go the distance!

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Jc: It’s a French film. And in France, films are subsidized by public and private funding. With regard to my film in particular, it was produced in the main thanks to the support of Canal+, the Cnc [Centre national du cinéma et de l’image animée], the Paca Region [Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur], and private funding.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at the Toronto International Film Festival?

Jc: International recognition. Which means a lot to me, given that my cinematographic influences have tended to be more American, and Asian. And also, three years ago, I was fortunate to take part in the Toronto Talent Lab. So it’s part of an ongoing story with Toronto.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Jc: “Joan, have trust!”

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Jc: Hmmm. By way of an answer, I’d say that the word “female” is superfluous in your question.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Jc: Unfortunately, Stanley Kubrick is not a woman. So I’d say Chantal Akerman. Her filmmaking is so sensitive, so radical. Hers is a powerful universe. I also like the films of Andrea Arnold.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Jc: First off, I feel that this is an issue that concerns most professions that have to do with leadership, with power.

Secondly, my answer, which may seem a little harsh, would be as follows: Sure, a woman often has to do two, three, four, or even five times more — and so on — to prove that she is as competent as a man. But one must never indulge in self-victimization.

I believe in work. Although, undeniably, certain things have to change with regard to the place granted to women in the movie world and elsewhere, such change has to come from men, but also from women.

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Joan Chemla — “If You Saw His Heart” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Lyra H.

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Star Struck: "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" at 40

9 September 2017 11:34 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

In the cinema of Steven Spielberg, to say nothing of the cinema of science fiction, of Hollywood, and of practical effects, Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) is a landmark, like the silhouette of a small mountain in the night skyline. Spielberg’s Duel (1971), carried over from television to movie theaters, was a wisp of a story elevated by its visual dynamism. His theatrical debut, The Sugarland Express (1974), was another 70s American road movie, notable today for the way it combines the appealing grit of the New Hollywood (and of Duel) with a much warmer, more charitable view of America and its culture. It contains the director’s first broken family unit—a key theme in his career—and was his first film scored by John Williams, even if it has almost none of the Williams trademarks. Jaws (1975) was the breakout smash, a lurid bucket-of-blood movie turned into a light day-at-the-beach movie, »

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Fyi: The It Remake Isn't Bad Just Because It Didn't Scare You

8 September 2017 2:40 PM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

The hotly anticipated It sequel has finally arrived, marking a pretty exciting occasion for Stephen King fans and general horror fans alike. After all, It is one of King's more successful and well-known novels, and the disappointing 1990 adaptation surely didn't do the story justice. In the months leading up to its release, the new iteration showed a lot of promise; the trailer is reasonably scary, and the new Pennywise, played by Bill Skarsgard, is evil enough to make children cry. As audiences flock to theaters and reviews roll out, the most pressing debate is clear: is it scary? Before I even address the debate itself, allow me to answer the question. Obviously, you're going to find It scary if you suffer from coulrophobia or if you're just a horror wimp in general. I will say, though, that I thought it would be scarier. As someone who f*cking loves horror movies, »

- Ryan Roschke

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George Clooney clumsily grafts a social-issues drama onto an old Coen brothers caper

8 September 2017 7:30 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

There’s a certain bizarro-world fascination to seeing one filmmaker dust off another’s ancient, un-filmed project. Think Steven Spielberg trying his hand at a Stanley Kubrick movie, or Sylvain Chomet bringing to life an old Jacques Tati script through the wonders of animation. In theory, George Clooney, that full-time…

Read more »

- A.A. Dowd

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Film News Roundup: Melanie Laurent, Nick Kroll Join ‘Operation Finale’

6 September 2017 3:54 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In today’s film news roundup, Melanie Laurent joins “Operation Finale,” “Game of Thrones” actor Eugene Simon is on board the drama “Resonance,” and Aden Young will star in the comedy drama “Elsewhere.”

Castings

Melanie Laurent and Nick Kroll have joined Oscar Isaac and Ben Kingsley in MGM’s “Operation Finale,” the historical drama about the capture of Adolf Eichmann.

Chris Weitz is directing the drama from Matthew Orton’s screenplay about the capture of Eichmann, who was one of the major architects of the Holocaust. Eichmann organized the transport of Jews from countries all over Europe to concentration camps, where an estimated 6 million died.

When World War II was ending, Eichmann fled to his home country of Austria and then moved to Argentina. Eichmann was captured in Argentina in 1960 by the Mossad, Israel’s intelligence service. Following a trial in Israel, he was found guilty of war crimes and hanged in 1962 at the age of 56.

Isaac »

- Dave McNary

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Stephen King’s ‘It’ Reviews: What the Critics Are Saying

6 September 2017 11:56 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Stephen King film and television adaptations have a long history of struggling to bring the horror master’s on-the-page visions to life. So despite early signs looking good for Andy Muschietti’s “It,” audiences still have reason to be slightly leery of its launch to the silver screen.

Many critics had middling things to say about the film, which is not really reflected in an early Rotten Tomatoes score of 92%. Variety‘s Andrew Barker wrote that “It” “feels like the flashier half of a longer story” and that “King fans will surely appreciate the clear effort and affection that went into this adaptation, even as it struggles to become more than the sum of its parts.”

Related

‘It,’ Stephen King Adaptation, Top Horror Pre-Seller in History

Comparisons to “Stand By Me” were drawn frequently, and although the young cast including Jaeden Lieberher, Finn Wolfhard, and Sophia Lillis was lauded almost universally, critics »

- Erin Nyren

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998

1-20 of 344 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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