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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 580 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Billie Whitelaw Of ‘The Omen’ & ‘The Krays’, Beckett Muse Is Dead At 82

23 December 2014 7:00 AM, PST | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Update Tuesday, 7:00 a.m. with more information, below:

Stage, screen and radio actress Billie Whitelaw was perhaps best known to international audiences for her role as Mrs. Baylock in 1976 horror film The Omen, but she had a versatile career at home in the UK where she was a muse to Samuel Beckett and won BAFTAs for her film and television work. Whitelaw died on Sunday at a London nursing home, her son told the BBC. She was 82. Among her many big-screen credits, which stretch back to 1953, are 1967’s Charlie Bubbles with Albert Finney; 1968’s The Twisted Nerve with Hayley Mills; Alfred Hitchcock’s 1972’s Frenzy; The Omen; 1988’s The Dressmaker with Joan Plowright and Pete Postlethwaite; Peter Medak’s classic biopic The Krays in 1990; and more recently, Edgar Wright’s 2007 Hot Fuzz with Simon Pegg.

Whitelaw was born in 1932 and made her radio acting debut at age 11, per the BBC. »

- The Deadline Team

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R.I.P. Billie Whitelaw (1932 – 2014)

22 December 2014 12:31 PM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Acclaimed British actress Billie Whitelaw has passed away yesterday aged 82, it has abeen announced. Whitelaw was best known for her role as Mrs. Blaylock in the horror classic The Omen, as well as her regular collaborations with playwright Samuel Beckett.

Born in Coventry in 1932, Whitelaw trained at Rada before making her stage debut in 1950, and first appeared on the big screen four years later in The Sleeping Tiger. She would enjoy regular movie appearances throughout the 1950s and 1960s, including a BAFTA Award-winning supporting turn in 1967’s Charlie Bubbles, and Alfred Hitchcock’s 1972 thriller Frenzy.

Beginning in 1963, Whitelaw gained acclaim for her work in the plays of Samuel Beckett, who penned many of his works specifically for the actress. She would also add a BAFTA TV Award in 1972’s The Sextet, before receiving international recognition with 1976’s The Omen., where she played the sinister nanny Mrs. Blaylock.

In later years, »

- Gary Collinson

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Bates Motel Season 3 Trailer Channels Norman’s Inner Psycho

22 December 2014 9:19 AM, PST | TheHDRoom | See recent TheHDRoom news »

A&E's Bates Motel is inching closer toward resembling Alfred Hitchcock's 1960's classic Psycho, the film that serves as inspiration for this modern-day prequel of sorts that examines the motel in its early days when Norman Bates (Freddie Highmore) was still in high school and his mother, Norma (Vera Farmiga), was still breathing.

The first Bates Motel Season 3 trailer begins with a first look at newcomer Tracy Spiridakos removing her clothing within one of the motel rooms. As the camera pulls back the camera's point of view is revealed to come through a peep hole, and none other than an overly curious and oftentimes creepy Norman is on the other side of it.

Pyscho featured an eerily similar scene with Anthony Perkins as Norman peeking through a similar hole at Marion Crane (Janet Leigh). We all know how that fascination with attractive women taking showers ended, though I would »

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R.I.P. Billie Whitelaw (1932 – 2014)

22 December 2014 5:27 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Acclaimed British actress Billie Whitelaw has passed away yesterday aged 82, it has abeen announced. Whitelaw was best known for her role as Mrs. Blaylock in the horror classic The Omen, as well as her regular collaborations with playwright Samuel Beckett.

Born in Coventry in 1932, Whitelaw trained at Rada before making her stage debut in 1950, and first appeared on the big screen four years later in The Sleeping Tiger. She would enjoy regular movie appearances throughout the 1950s and 1960s, including a BAFTA Award-winning supporting turn in 1967’s Charlie Bubbles, and Alfred Hitchcock’s 1972 thriller Frenzy.

Beginning in 1963, Whitelaw gained acclaim for her work in the plays of Samuel Beckett, who penned many of his works specifically for the actress. She would also add a BAFTA TV Award in 1972’s The Sextet, before receiving international recognition with 1976’s The Omen., where she played the sinister nanny Mrs. Blaylock.

In later years, »

- Gary Collinson

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Watch: ‘Bates Motel’ Re-creates Classic ‘Psycho’ Peep Hole Scene

20 December 2014 11:27 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The upcoming third season of A&E’s “Bates Motel” may resemble Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho,” the film from which it draws inspiration, even more than usual.

The first promo for season three teases Tracy Spiridakos’ sexy debut. Freddie Highmore’s Norman Bates peeps through a hole in the wall as Spiridakos’ Annika Johnson — a mysterious new hotel guest — undresses in the privacy of her own room before stepping into the shower.

The scene is almost  identical to the famous one in the classic 1960 thriller in which Anthony PerkinsNorman Bates spies on a scantily clad Marion Crane (played by Janet Leigh).

Season three of “Bates Motel” premieres on A&E in March.

»

- Maane Khatchatourian

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Roger Deakins recalls 'The Man Who Wasn't There' and film noir favorites

19 December 2014 12:17 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

It seemed this year that if any artist was due for the retrospective treatment, it was "Unbroken" cinematographer Roger Deakins. While I of course did not address all of the 50-plus films he has shot throughout his illustrious career during a recent extended interview, I settled on a few in particular that I think represent a nice cross-section of his work. Each of them — "Nineteen Eighty-Four," "Sid and Nancy," "Barton Fink," "The Shawshank Redemption," "Kundun," "The Man Who Wasn't There" and "The Village" — will get their own space in the next few days. 2001 was an interesting year for Roger Deakins. With John Nash biopic "A Beautiful Mind" — the only time he's ever worked with director Ron Howard — he shot the year's Best Picture winner, while his on-going collaboration with the Coen brothers' yielded "The Man Who Wasn't There" and the chance to work on a cinematographer's dream: a film noir. »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Lol: Christmas Morning, As Directed By 20 Famous Filmmakers

19 December 2014 6:00 AM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Last year, we published a fantastic video by Fourgrounds Media Inc. called The Auteurs of Christmas which reimagined the magic of Christmas morning through the eyes of 10 famous filmmakers.  They have returned with a sequel for 2014: The Auteurs of Christmas 2, which features Christmas morning as directed by 10 more filmmakers: Charlie Chaplin, Quentin Tarantino, Terrance Malick, Alfred Hitchcock, […]

The post Lol: Christmas Morning, As Directed By 20 Famous Filmmakers appeared first on /Film. »

- Peter Sciretta

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Watch: If Quentin Tarantino, Terrence Malick and Christopher Nolan Made Christmas Movies

18 December 2014 5:20 PM, PST | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

November and December are always good for a holiday-themed movie or several, but ever notice how many of today's biggest and most popular filmmakers tend not to make straight-up Christmas movies? At least not often enough, if you ask us. So if we want to see folks like Quentin Tarantino, Terrence Malick, Christopher Nolan and Alfred Hitchcock inject a little of that holiday spirit straight into our jingle-bell'n souls, we have to rely on spoof videos like the one below, courtesy of Fourgrounds and Suitcase in Point Theatre Company.   This isn't the first time they've staged a holiday-themed video showcasing the fictional Christmas movies from popular filmmakers. Check out last year's version, too.   If you had to pick one filmmaker to...

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- Erik Davis

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Watch: Take A 96-Minute Masterclass On The Art Of Filmmaking With Alfred Hitchcock

18 December 2014 1:55 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

There are many different kinds of directors. Some are actor’s directors, others masters of spectacle and awe. Then there are directors who just get the schematics of film on a gut level. Their films are often constructed with the unerring precision of a Swiss watch: symphonies of sound, visuals, and editing working seamlessly in synchronicity. David Fincher belongs in this category, as does Michael Mann. But the granddaddy of them all is still the master of suspense, Alfred Hitchcock. The man’s knowledge of his craft was practically limitless and it was always a joy to hear him talk about it. Hitch was also imminently quotable when it came to the filmmaking process. His recollection of writing the act of a character simply walking through a door (the big question being “how” this is done) is note-perfect in capturing the frustration inherent in perfecting one’s art. In case »

- Nicholas Laskin

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Cake Movie Review

18 December 2014 8:26 AM, PST | ShockYa | See recent ShockYa news »

Title: Cake Director: Daniel Barnz Starring: Jennifer Anniston, Adriana Barraza, Felicity Huffman, William H. Macy, Anna Kendrick, Sam Worthington. Alfred Hitchcock once said that “Cinema is not a slice of life, but a piece of cake,” and snotty moviegoers will surely drool in seeing Jennifer Aniston finally committing to a challenging role with a raw interpretation. ‘Cake’ is the first low-budget, indie-style film since 2006’s ‘Friends with Money,’ where the comedic actress takes on a dramatic role, portraying a woman suffering from chronic pain, both mental and physical. The film opens at a support group where the acquaintances of Nina, a suicide victim (Anna Kendrick), are asked to share what  [ Read More ]

The post Cake Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com. »

- Chiara Spagnoli Gabardi

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Witness to Murder | Blu-ray Review

16 December 2014 12:30 PM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Available for the first time on Blu-ray or DVD and remastered in high definition is forgotten film noir Witness to Murder, a 1954 Barbara Stanwyck potboiler also starring George Sanders and Gary Merrill. As written by Chester Erskine (The Egg and I, 1947), the film feels like plenty of other narratives, though its frustrating contrivance of hysteria as dramatic tension places it squarely within a particular male dominated paradigm. In particular, the film feels eerily reminiscent of Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window, which actually opened a month after this Roy Rowland directed venture, doomed to be overshadowed and quickly forgotten. But, magnificently photographed by John Alton, it’s a shadowy and angular motion picture, enjoyable for its considerable melodrama as a portrait of misinformed and misogynistic gender politics.

Cheryl Draper (Barbara Stanwyck) witnesses a young woman being murdered in the apartment complex adjacent to her own. She calls the police to report what she sees. »

- Nicholas Bell

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Watch: Explore The Life And Work Of Alfred Hitchcock In 55-Minute Doc 'Living Famously'

16 December 2014 9:54 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

“Murder, mysteries and crimes of passion.” We would argue there’s a bit more to it than that, but if you had to distill the cinema of Alfred Hitchcock into just three elements, that’s a pretty good place to start. Few directors can come within spitting distance of an oeuvre encompassing some of the greatest films of all time, including “The 39 Steps,” “Strangers on a Train,” “Rear Window” and of course “Psycho.” He’s also one of the most memorable of filmmakers in terms of his public persona, with a capacity for charming, grandiloquent speechifying and a rapier wit that seemed to let his audiences know he was in on the joke even as he delighted in terrifying them. Hitchcock's legacy has loomed large over the last half-century of American film, directly influencing everyone from his friend and peer Francois Truffaut (see “The Soft Skin” if you haven’t »

- Nicholas Laskin

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Steven Spielberg vs Alfred Hitchcock - Epic Rap Battles of History

16 December 2014 7:40 AM, PST | GeekTyrant | See recent GeekTyrant news »

An awesome new episode of Epic Rap Battles of History brilliantly pits Steven Spielberg against Alfred Hitchcock in an extended rap showdown. There are a few extra director cameos in the video that I wasn’t expecting. It is incredibly fun to watch, and the lyrics they spit at each other were entertainingly merciless disses. I enjoy this web-series, but this is definitely one of my favorite episodes. Here is the note that came along with the video:

Hi. My name is Nice Peter, and this is EpicLLOYD, and this is Epic Rap Battles of History, Season 4. As always, these videos could not be possible without your suggestions, your subscription, and the help of a lot of awesome people. Special thanks to all of you and everyone in our crew who helped make this happen.

I also included a behind-the-scenes video. Enjoy!

»

- Joey Paur

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Criterion's March 2015 Lineup Includes Two From Errol Morris, Francois Truffaut's 'The Soft Skin' And More

16 December 2014 6:48 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The holidays can be tough on the bank account, but nothing can put as big a dent – and give you as much pleasure – as Criterion releases. Just in time for all the yuletide celebrations, the famed boutique label revealed its slate for next March, and it should satisfy documentary fans. First up, let’s start with a pair of renowned European filmmakers with long-standing ties with Criterion: Francois Truffaut and Ingmar Bergman. Truffaut’s Alfred Hitchcock-inspired “The Soft Skin” will get the big C treatment for the first time as it hits shelves on March 10th, 2015. It will arrive with an audio commentary, visual essay and more among the extras. Later that month, on the 31st, Bergman’s “Cries and Whispers” gets an upgrade to Blu-ray, along with some new artwork too. With the release of “Inherent Vice,” you may be itching for more noir films to watch – after completing our list, »

- Cain Rodriguez

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Lol: Watch Steven Spielberg and Alfred Hitchcock Face Off in An Epic Rap Battle

15 December 2014 4:00 PM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

The Epic Rap Battles of History video series has been going for a couple years. The crew behind the show, which is in its fourth “season,” consistently manages to create simple beats and entertainingly brutal verbal disses by ringleaders Peter Shukoff and Lloyd Ahlquist, and some impressive costumes for the core cast that performs as various figures […]

The post Lol: Watch Steven Spielberg and Alfred Hitchcock Face Off in An Epic Rap Battle appeared first on /Film. »

- Russ Fischer

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‘Epic Rap Battles Of History’ Debuts Director Battle, Goes On Hiatus

15 December 2014 3:28 PM, PST | Tubefilter.com | See recent Tubefilter News news »

For its fourth season, Epic Rap Battles of History did away with its biweekly release schedule in order to bring fans a new battle each week. That format succeeded in diminishing the wait between episodes, but it also caused Erb to exhaust its new episodes twice as fast. The extremely popular web series has concluded the first half of its fourth season with a free-for-all among five famous directors. The video is billed as a battle between Steven Spielberg and Alfred Hitchcock, played by Erb co-creators Peter Shukoff and Lloyd Ahlquist, respectively. In truth, the two-time Oscar winner and the master of suspense only get one verse apiece before ceding the microphone to three more accomplished directors: Quentin Tarantino (played by rapped Wax), Stanley Kubrick (played by an actor who is only credited as "The Ghost of Stanley Kubrick"), and Michael Bay (played by Shukoff). Bay may not have the directorial clout of his competitors, »

- Sam Gutelle

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Joan Fontaine ‘Suspicion’ Oscar Auction Stymied by Academy

13 December 2014 10:47 AM, PST | TheImproper.com | See recent TheImproper.com news »

Joan Fontaine’s historic best actress Oscar for her role in Alfred Hitchcock’s classic “Suspicion,” won’t got to the auction block, because of a threatened lawsuit by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Fontaine, who died a year ago at age 96, specified in her will that her Oscar should be sold to raise funds for the Monterey, California Spca. It was expected to fetch as much as $300,000, according to an estimate by Christie’s, which was handling the sale. [...] »

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Daily | Books | Martin, Mekas, Pasolini

12 December 2014 9:20 AM, PST | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The prolific critic Adrian Martin has a new book out, Mise en Scène and Film Style: From Classical Hollywood to New Media Art. You may remember that in August, he wrote about the mise en scène of Alfred Hitchcock's Notorious (1946). Also in today's books roundup: Jonas Mekas on the poetry of Pier Paolo Pasolini, an excerpt from a new book on Asghar Farhadi, a review of another on Terence Davies, Ted Hope's story about Hal Hartley’s Flirt, memoirs by Anjelica Huston and Lena Dunham, a biography of John Wayne and more. » - David Hudson »

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My First Time in Variety: Tippi Hedren

11 December 2014 8:57 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s a story that’s become Hollywood legend: Model Tippi Hedren’s life was forever changed when she was cast in Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds.” But Variety columnist Army Archerd first reported the news in his column rather banally back in 1962: “Mort Sahl’s gal friend also in the company.”

How did you get cast in the movie?

I had just moved back to Los Angeles because I wanted (my daughter) Melanie (Griffith) to have a little bit of independence. I thought my career as a fashion model and doing all those commercials would continue in L.A. as it had in New York, but it wasn’t happening. Then all of a sudden a phone call came asking if I was the woman in the Sego commercial. And I said, “Yes. Why?” And he said, “There’s a producer who’s interested in you.” It became »

- Debra Birnbaum

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Get an exclusive look at 'Bones' 200th episode, set in 1950s Hollywood

11 December 2014 2:23 PM, PST | EW - Inside TV | See recent EW.com - Inside TV news »

Tonight, Bones can officially count itself among the select list of scripted dramas to reach its 200th episode. Being a milestone, "The 200th in the 10th" brings something out of the ordinary for the series: The episode stars its regular cast in their respective roles, but it's set in 1950s Hollywood, employing an Alfred Hitchcock-esque style, and acting as a standalone for the series. »

- C. Molly Smith

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