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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 96 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Omg! Oscars, Muriels and Gelderblom’S “Pretty Messed Up”!

25 February 2017 12:18 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

So, going into the final stretch before the Oscars are announced, I have a question: if you like—no, love this year’s front-running La La Land, does that make you a bad person, or just deluded? Don’t laugh—there may be people at your own Oscar party who will have already come to their own conclusion on that conundrum. This year’s presumptive favorite is so presumptive that people are talking about the film as if it had already won and are projecting as to whether it’s an enduring classic or just another meh-fest to be thrown on the mediocrity pile along with Crash, Chicago, Argo, The Artist and about half of the rest of Oscar’s Best Picture winners since the Academy started handing out awards at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in 1929. It is hard to deny, no matter how much you like or dislike La La Land, »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Bates Motel on A&E: Cancelled or Renewed for Season Six?

24 February 2017 6:59 PM, PST | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Vulture WatchWhen will Norman's madness end? Has the Bates Motel TV show been cancelled or renewed for a sixth season on A&E? The television vulture is watching all the latest cancellation and renewal news, so this page is the place to track the status of Bates Motel season six. Bookmark it, or subscribe for the latest updates. Remember, the television vulture is watching your shows. Are you?  What's This TV Show About?A prequel series to Alfred Hitchcock's feature film, Psycho, airing on the A&E cable channel, Bates Motel stars Vera Farmiga, Freddie Highmore, Max Thieriot, Olivia Cooke, and Nestor Carbonell, with Kenny Johnson recurring. Rihanna will guest as Marion Crane, a role originated by Janet Leigh in the 1960 movie. At the end of season four, Norman Bates (Highmore) murdered his beloved mother, Norma (Farmiga). Season five kicks off two years later, with Norman living a double life. He appears to »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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‘When We Rise’ Review: Why Dustin Lance Black, Gus Van Sant, and Dee Rees’ Miniseries Should Have Been a Movie

23 February 2017 9:17 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

An onslaught of onscreen and offscreen talent unite with a clear sense of purpose in the limited series “When We Rise.” An examination of gay and women’s rights over three decades and how their causes conflict and coalesce, Dustin Lance Black’s new ABC offering emphasizes what’s possible when oppressed minorities come together and fight back against a malicious patriarchy.

There’s no shortage of modern parallels at play, and ABC is counting on the public’s revived passion for protest to drive interest in a show that honors those who paved the way with picket signs and (mostly) passive resistance. The eight-episode series written by Black (mostly) does right by its honorable cause, but it suffers from the strictures of its format. A sprawling story creates an awkward combination of history lessons and personal stories, and broadcast standards prove far too restrictive. The result is a conglomeration »

- Ben Travers

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‘When We Rise’ Review: Why Dustin Lance Black, Gus Van Sant, and Dee Rees’ Miniseries Should Have Been a Movie

23 February 2017 9:17 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

An onslaught of onscreen and offscreen talent unite with a clear sense of purpose in the limited series “When We Rise.” An examination of gay and women’s rights over three decades and how their causes conflict and coalesce, Dustin Lance Black’s new ABC offering emphasizes what’s possible when oppressed minorities come together and fight back against a malicious patriarchy.

There’s no shortage of modern parallels at play, and ABC is counting on the public’s revived passion for protest to drive interest in a show that honors those who paved the way with picket signs and (mostly) passive resistance. The eight-episode series written by Black (mostly) does right by its honorable cause, but it suffers from the strictures of its format. A sprawling story creates an awkward combination of history lessons and personal stories, and broadcast standards prove far too restrictive. The result is a conglomeration »

- Ben Travers

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Peter Travers' 2017 Alt-Oscars: From Scorsese to 'Deadpool'

23 February 2017 7:13 AM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Come Sunday, a.k.a. Oscars night, we'll all be tipping our hats to the year's winners. But before we do that, here's to the "losers" – the worthy ones of 2016 that, for whatever cockamamie reason, didn't even get a nomination.

In an effort to do right where the Academy effed up, I give you the Travers Awards – my own personal version of the Alt-Oscars. (For those of you playing along at home, the award is an engraved image of a critic screaming.) It's one last chance to single out the »

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Masters of Cinema Cast – Episode 55 – Vampyr

22 February 2017 5:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Joakim is joined by Adam Gonet from The Art Shelf  to discuss this spooky classic. Enjoy.

From Masters of Cinema:

The first sound-film by one of the greatest of all filmmakers, Vampyr offers a sensual immediacy that few, if any, works of cinema can claim to match. Legendary director Carl Theodor Dreyer leads the viewer, as though guided in a trance, through a realm akin to a waking-dream, a zone positioned somewhere between reality and the supernatural.

Traveller Allan Gray (arrestingly depicted by Julian West, aka the secretive real-life Baron Nicolas de Gunzburg) arrives at a countryside inn seemingly beckoned by haunted forces. His growing acquaintance with the family who reside there soon opens up a network of uncanny associations between the dead and the living, of ghostly lore and demonology, which pull Gray ever deeper into an unsettling, and upsetting, mystery. At its core: troubled Gisèle, chaste daughter and sexual incarnation, »

- Tom Jennings

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Bates Motel: A&E Showrunner Teases the Final Season, Series Ending

21 February 2017 6:14 PM, PST | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Most of us know the ending to Psycho, but how will Bates Motel end? Recently, showrunner Kerry Ehrin spoke with Entertainment Weekly about the final season of the A&E TV series.As reported earlier, the final season of the Psycho prequel will feature Rihanna as Marion Crane, the role made famous by Janet Leigh in the original Alfred Hitchcock film. The new season will also feature an episode written by star Freddie Highmore.Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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The TV Show You Need To Watch on Every Network, Right Now — A Running List

21 February 2017 9:49 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Historically, just about every network out there has produced one of the best TV shows ever made. The broadcast networks had a head start, offering up everything from “I Love Lucy” to “Friday Night Lights.” Meanwhile, HBO has been pushing great shows since “Sex and the City” and up through “The Leftovers.” And in that time, the rest of cable joined in: AMC introduced “Mad Men” and “Breaking Bad” before Netflix made streaming series serious awards contenders.

Now, we live in a golden age of television where the year’s best TV show can pop up anywhere. With that in mind, IndieWire decided to help highlight the best programs from every corner of the TV landscape. In the gallery above, you’ll find our picks for the best TV shows on each network right now. We’ll update our picks every month (or more) with your best option on every network, »

- Ben Travers

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The TV Show You Need To Watch on Every Network, Right Now — A Running List

21 February 2017 9:49 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Historically, just about every network out there has produced one of the best TV shows ever made. The broadcast networks had a head start, offering up everything from “I Love Lucy” to “Friday Night Lights.” Meanwhile, HBO has been pushing great shows since “Sex and the City” and up through “The Leftovers.” And in that time, the rest of cable joined in: AMC introduced “Mad Men” and “Breaking Bad” before Netflix made streaming series serious awards contenders.

Now, we live in a golden age of television where the year’s best TV show can pop up anywhere. With that in mind, IndieWire decided to help highlight the best programs from every corner of the TV landscape. In the gallery above, you’ll find our picks for the best TV shows on each network right now. We’ll update our picks every month (or more) with your best option on every network, »

- Ben Travers

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How Alfred Hitchcock, ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ and More Influenced Wes Anderson — Watch

20 February 2017 2:37 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

We won’t see “Isle of Dogs” until sometime next year, but there are still plenty of Wes Anderson movies to rewatch in the meantime. Vimeo user Candice Drouet has put together a brief video detailing some of the idiosyncratic writer/director’s influences. Avail yourself of it below.

Read More: Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ Crowdfunding Campaign Raises Over $250k for Martin Scorsese’s Film Foundation

A number of scenes from Anderson’s films are shown side-by-side with their influences: A train sequence from “The Grand Budapest Hotel” bears a strong resemblance to one in Alfred Hitchcock’s “The 39 Steps,” for instance, while a sequence that finds Willem Dafoe riding a motorcycle in goggles was clearly inspired by “Lawrence of Arabia.”

Read More: ‘Isle of Dogs’ Plot Details Revealed as Fox Searchlight Picks Up Wes Anderson’s Film for 2018 Release

Also featured: “Torn Curtain,” “Vertigo,” “The Red Shoes, »

- Michael Nordine

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'Mr. and Mrs. Smith': THR's 1941 Review

20 February 2017 11:13 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

On Feb. 20, 1941, Alfred Hitchcock took a detour from mystery films and opened his comedy Mr. and Mrs. Smith at Radio City Music Hall in New York. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below.

Mr. and Mrs. Smith is not the most brilliant comedy to hit the screen, nor is it the best directed, acted or produced. It may be disappointing to many of the followers of Norman Krasna, Alfred Hitchcock and Carole Lombard who expected extreme brilliance from that trio, but there's enough fun in it to send you home happy with your entertainment. 

The main trouble with »

- THR Staff

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Bates Motel: What is it about and should you watch it?

20 February 2017 9:05 AM, PST | Monsters and Critics | See recent Monsters and Critics news »

Bates Motel Season 5 starts tonight on A&E — but if you’re not familiar with the series, what’s it all about, and is it worth watching? Bates Motel is a “contemporary prequel” to the iconic 1960 horror film Psycho, and follows its characters Norman Bates and his mother before Alfred Hitchcock’s film took place, but set in the modern day. In the Hitchcock movie, serial killer Norman — who also murdered his mother — pretends she is still alive, and recreates her as an alternative personality in his mind. Season 4 saw a young Norman kill his mother, while Season 5 starts two...read more »

- Julian Cheatle

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Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ Crowdfunding Campaign Raises Over $250k for Martin Scorsese’s Film Foundation

20 February 2017 7:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Wes Anderson has scored a major win for the cause of film preservation, raising more than a quarter of a million dollars for Martin Scorsese’s The Film Foundation. In December, Anderson released a video that announced his latest project, the stop-motion animation film “Isle of Dogs,” and also invited people to donate money to a campaign hosted by Crowdrise, the crowdfunding company co-founded by Anderson’s friend and frequent collaborator, Edward Norton. The campaign ended last week.

Read More: Wes Anderson Directs New Christmas Short Film With Adrien Brody — Watch

Among the prizes offered to donors were a trip for two to London for two nights to meet the director, get a tour of the “Isle of Dogs” sets and production and even record the voice of a dog in the film. “Barking, howling and whimpering may be required,” the campaign specified. Other prizes included signed Criterion Collection DVDs »

- Graham Winfrey

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‘Bates Motel’ Review: Season 5 Does Right By Alfred Hitchcock By Ditching His Original Ending

20 February 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Bates Motel” could not exist without “Psycho,” but soon it could feel like the other way around. Part of the brilliance within Kerry Ehrin’s deep exploration of Alfred Hitchcock’s characters is how even in the modern day — and even while always promising an ending independent of the film’s narrative — it feels as though we’re being given crucial backstory to a character we only came to know as a pervert, murderer, and psychopath — in that order. Fifty-seven years later, “Bates Motel” is filling in the details by fleshing out Norman’s motivations, psychological state, and ultimate descent into madness.

[Editor’s Note: The below analysis contains spoilers for “Bates Motel” Season 4, but not the new season.]

The final season is steeped in more Hitchcockian lore than ever. There’s a subtle nod to the iconic shower scene in the first episode, when Norman mentions how he just finished installing new curtains. We get our first glimpse of Norma’s permanent residence, or at least »

- Ben Travers

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‘Bates Motel’ Review: Season 5 Does Right By Alfred Hitchcock By Ditching His Original Ending

20 February 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Bates Motel” could not exist without “Psycho,” but soon it could feel like the other way around. Part of the brilliance within Kerry Ehrin’s deep exploration of Alfred Hitchcock’s characters is how even in the modern day — and even while always promising an ending independent of the film’s narrative — it feels as though we’re being given crucial backstory to a character we only came to know as a pervert, murderer, and psychopath — in that order. Fifty-seven years later, “Bates Motel” is filling in the details by fleshing out Norman’s motivations, psychological state, and ultimate descent into madness.

[Editor’s Note: The below analysis contains spoilers for “Bates Motel” Season 4, but not the new season.]

The final season is steeped in more Hitchcockian lore than ever. There’s a subtle nod to the iconic shower scene in the first episode, when Norman mentions how he just finished installing new curtains. We get our first glimpse of Norma’s permanent residence, or at least »

- Ben Travers

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‘Girls’ Review: ‘Hostage Situation’ Has A Horror Movie Premise

19 February 2017 7:30 PM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Last Week’S Review: Season 6 Premiere Finds the Light While Escaping It All

Love Her or Hate Her

Hannah is finally getting some traction in her career, and it looks good on her. Although she’s the same self-indulgent, dramatically inclined person we’ve always known, there’s a newfound calmness about her as she settles into something resembling maturity. This week it manifested in a surprising heart-to-heart between Hannah and Bff Marnie, with whom Hannah had escaped the city so that Marnie could partake in some self-indulgences herself (namely in the form of ex-husband Desi). In a poignant moment, Hannah admitted that she’s no longer judging because she’s finally realized no one has it all figured out, and we actually believe her. Even though hours earlier she was lamenting about having to keep Marnie’s tryst with Desi a secret from Ray.

One Step Forward, Two »

- Amber Dowling

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‘Girls’ Review: ‘Hostage Situation’ Has A Horror Movie Premise

19 February 2017 7:30 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Last Week’S Review: Season 6 Premiere Finds the Light While Escaping It All

Love Her or Hate Her

Hannah is finally getting some traction in her career, and it looks good on her. Although she’s the same self-indulgent, dramatically inclined person we’ve always known, there’s a newfound calmness about her as she settles into something resembling maturity. This week it manifested in a surprising heart-to-heart between Hannah and Bff Marnie, with whom Hannah had escaped the city so that Marnie could partake in some self-indulgences herself (namely in the form of ex-husband Desi). In a poignant moment, Hannah admitted that she’s no longer judging because she’s finally realized no one has it all figured out, and we actually believe her. Even though hours earlier she was lamenting about having to keep Marnie’s tryst with Desi a secret from Ray.

One Step Forward, Two »

- Amber Dowling

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‘The Walking Dead’ Review: Rick Goes Dumpster Diving in ‘New Best Friends’

19 February 2017 7:05 PM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Last Week’S Review: Rick Goes Recruiting in ‘Rock In The Road

Whose Episode Is It?

Two main plotlines run through “New Best Friends”: The Ricketeers meet a new group of truly odd survivors, and Daryl considers his options in the Kingdom and reunites with Carol. This gives the episode a bit of tonal whiplash, since the Rick stuff is downright goofy (yes, goofier than the Kingdom), while Daryl and Carol’s scenes are emotionally fraught. Still, both storylines are satisfying in their own way.

Yet Another Human Faction

Hoo boy, this new group introduced this week. They take Rick and the others to their lair, which is a huge garbage dump. Rick’s still grinning, because he’s happy to recruit anyone into his war, even this group of high-wattage mega-weirdos. The Dumpsters are more like a post-apocalypse faction you’d find in “Mad Max”; they speak in short, »

- Jeff Stone

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‘The Walking Dead’ Review: Rick Goes Dumpster Diving in ‘New Best Friends’

19 February 2017 7:05 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Last Week’S Review: Rick Goes Recruiting in ‘Rock In The Road

Whose Episode Is It?

Two main plotlines run through “New Best Friends”: The Ricketeers meet a new group of truly odd survivors, and Daryl considers his options in the Kingdom and reunites with Carol. This gives the episode a bit of tonal whiplash, since the Rick stuff is downright goofy (yes, goofier than the Kingdom), while Daryl and Carol’s scenes are emotionally fraught. Still, both storylines are satisfying in their own way.

Yet Another Human Faction

Hoo boy, this new group introduced this week. They take Rick and the others to their lair, which is a huge garbage dump. Rick’s still grinning, because he’s happy to recruit anyone into his war, even this group of high-wattage mega-weirdos. The Dumpsters are more like a post-apocalypse faction you’d find in “Mad Max”; they speak in short, »

- Jeff Stone

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Richard Schickel, Influential Time Magazine Film Critic, Dies at 84

19 February 2017 5:58 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Richard Schickel, the longtime film critic for Time magazine who also wrote 37 books, mostly on film, and directed a number of documentaries on film subjects, died on Saturday in Los Angeles of complications from a series of strokes, his family told the Los Angeles Times. He was 84.

“He was one of the fathers of American film criticism,” his daughter, writer Erika Schickel, told the Times. “He had a singular voice. When he wrote or spoke, he had an old-fashioned way of turning a phrase. He was blunt and succinct both on the page and in life.”

He wrote and/or directed more than 30 documentaries, mostly for television.

Schickel shared a 1977 Emmy nomination for the documentary “Life Goes to the Movies” and received two nominations in 1987 for the documentary “Minnelli on Minnelli: Liza Remembers Vincente,” which he directed.

Schickel wrote film reviews for Life magazine from 1965 until the magazine folded in »

- Carmel Dagan

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 96 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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