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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 277 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Jovy Skol’s Ten Best Opening Kills In Horror

16 hours ago | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

Alfred Hitchcock shocked audiences in 1960 with his black and white classic Psycho when he decided to kill of leading lady Janet Leigh in the first 45 minutes. Her death scene was considered brutal and almost pornographic in the standards of that day, but Hitchcock didn’t care. He wanted to scare and take you by surprise. Since then, many films have successfully utilized this technique of opening their films with murder and here some that had me hooked.

 

 

Halloween

Definitely one of the most famous scenes in horror story, the original 1978 classic opens with a Pov scene of a mysterious voyeur. We watch through his eyes as two teenagers make out while he grabs a huge knife and mask, waits for the boyfriend to leave and makes his way upstairs. He finds the girl in just her underwear, combing her hair unaware that she’s about to be stabbed to death. »

- Jovy Skol

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New Projects: ‘The Birds’, ‘Monopoly’, and ‘Ashley’s War’

2 July 2015 8:31 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Every time it feels like Hollywood has decided to remake a property that couldn’t be more sacred, they one up the ante. Michael Bay has been prepping a remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s suspense/horror classic The Birds, and Variety reports that the project has now found its director: Dutch filmmaker Diederik Van Rooijen. Van Rooijen has directed the thrillers Tape and Daylight previously, but never a film in the English language.

Hitchcock’s film from 1963, arguably his last great movie and the story of how birds terrorized a small town in Northern California, has never been officially remade, but its influences are everywhere. Heck, even Jurassic World has a scene with pterodactyls worthy of Hitch.

No details on additional plot points or when production is expected to begin have yet been revealed.

So far the list of movies based on board games includes Clue, Battleship, Jumanji, and maybe someday, »

- Brian Welk

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Van Rooijen To Helm "The Birds" Remake

2 July 2015 4:10 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Dutch filmmaker Diederik Van Rooijen has been hired to direct the remake of Alfred Hitchcock's classic thriller "The Birds" for Platinum Dunes, Mandalay Pictures and Universal Pictures.

The original film, based on the shorty story by Daphne du Maurier, followed a San Francisco socialite who moves to a small northern California town that suddenly comes under attack from various types of birds.

No word on what the new one's story will be. Michael Bay, Andrew Form, Brad Fuller, Peter Guber and David Zelon will produce.

Source: Variety »

- Garth Franklin

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Last Surviving Gwtw Star and 2-Time Oscar Winner Has Turned 99: As a Plus, She Made U.S. Labor Law History

1 July 2015 6:51 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Olivia de Havilland picture U.S. labor history-making 'Gone with the Wind' star and two-time Best Actress winner Olivia de Havilland turns 99 (This Olivia de Havilland article is currently being revised and expanded.) Two-time Best Actress Academy Award winner Olivia de Havilland, the only surviving major Gone with the Wind cast member and oldest surviving Oscar winner, is turning 99 years old today, July 1.[1] Also known for her widely publicized feud with sister Joan Fontaine and for her eight movies with Errol Flynn, de Havilland should be remembered as well for having made Hollywood labor history. This particular history has nothing to do with de Havilland's films, her two Oscars, Gone with the Wind, Joan Fontaine, or Errol Flynn. Instead, history was made as a result of a legal fight: after winning a lawsuit against Warner Bros. in the mid-'40s, Olivia de Havilland put an end to treacherous »

- Andre Soares

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Watch: New U.S. Trailer For 'Tom At The Farm' Directed By And Starring Xavier Dolan

1 July 2015 9:11 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Between "Laurence Anyways" and last year's acclaimed and Cannes prize-winning "Mommy," the prolific Xavier Dolan directed "Tom At The Farm." Like his previous efforts, it hit the festival circuit, but it appears the film's darker tone turned some off, and not much has been heard about the movie since 2013. It opened in Canada and other international territories, but a U.S. distribution deal proved elusive. But Amplify has finally snapped it up and a new U.S. trailer for the picture is here. Dolan takes the lead role in this psycho-sexual thriller that would make Alfred Hitchcock proud. He plays the titular Tom who, following the death of his lover, Guillaume (Caleb Landry Jones, in a very small uncredited role), goes to his family's rural farm for the funeral. But it turns out they didn't know anything about Guillaume's sexuality or partner. Tom doesn't out his former lover, but things take a dark turn when. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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The Birds Remake Finds a Director

1 July 2015 9:03 AM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Michael Bay's production company, Platinum Dunes, is set to remake lfred Hitchcock's The Birds, and today they've found a director to bring it to life.  Come inside to learn more!

Alfred Hitchcock, the master of suspense has a long filmmography to pick and choose from.  With Hollywood remaking just about everything in sight, it's no surprise that The Birds is up next.  Michael Bay is producing the upcoming flick, and today, Variety has revealed that there's a director lined up and ready: 

After successfully remaking several 80s slasher films, Michael Bay and his Platinum Dunes banner look ready to remake one of the master of suspense’s classic films alongside Peter Guber’s Mandalay Pictures.

Platinum Dunes, Mandalay Pictures and Universal have tapped Dutch filmmaker Diederik Van Rooijen to direct the remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds.”

Rooijen doesn't have a very large body of work, so it's »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Jordan Maison)

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Beautiful Disasters: "Roar"

29 June 2015 8:47 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

There is a case to be made for home movies as the purest form of cinema. It’s folly, of course, to pit films against one another based on the circumstances under which they were made; to argue what is realer, and thus more valid, than the other. In a camera’s lens, especially, the lines of truth and lies blur and overlap. It’s just that in what we believe to be reality the stakes are always higher, the emotions elevated. One of the first films ever made, the Lumière brothers’ L'arrivée d'un train à La Ciotat, was a succinct 56 seconds that depicted the arrival of a train at its station in Lyon, France. When it was first shown to the public it was the audience’s virgin film-viewing experience, and it was reported that many were frightened by the illusion that the train was coming straight for them. »

- Oliver Skinner

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Munich Films Festival Attracts Best of Global Filmmaking

25 June 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Munich has been a film-industry center for about a century. Camera company Arri launched there in 1917, and Bavaria Film Studios was established in 1919, although its founder, Peter Ostermayr, had been making movies in the city for several years before. Alfred Hitchcock shot his first released feature there in 1925, and was followed by such leading filmmakers as Billy Wilder, John Huston and Stanley Kubrick.

It is within that tradition that Diana Iljine, CEO and director of the Munich Film Festival, presents her event, which opens with David Oelhoffen’s Algeria-set Western “Far From Men,” starring Viggo Mortensen; the closing-night feature will be Matteo Garrone’s “Tale of Tales,” pictured above, starring Salma Hayek, fresh from its Cannes debut.

“Munich has always been a movie town,” Iljine says. The city remains one of the world’s great movie-business hubs, and that’s one reason why the festival attracts 2,000 or so film industry professionals, »

- Leo Barraclough

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What Scares You?

24 June 2015 10:47 PM, PDT | MoreHorror | See recent MoreHorror news »

Written by Tom Wood

MoreHorror.com

What, who, why or even how did your fascination with Horror begin? I will give you a minute to think whilst I set the scene. The other day, I was driving my car to work; A journey that has been done a thousand times before and as a result, it has become so tedious; so pathetically boring; I could probably do it with my eyes closed and without thinking (not that I will of course, that would just be plain dangerous on so many levels); But my point is, whilst I was driving, a question, not just any old question, but that question popped and buried itself deep into the back of my head. A simple question of What made me interested in Horror? Had evolved and mutated like a diseased zombie into further questioning and so forth, that in the end, a whole »

- admin

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Film Review: ‘Ingrid Bergman — In Her Own Words’

24 June 2015 9:25 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A treasure trove of home movies is the main reason to see Stig Bjorkman’s loving documentary “Ingrid Bergman — In Her Own Words,”  which mines excerpts from the Swedish-born star’s letters and diaries as well as archival interviews. Fans are unlikely to learn anything new, and the docu may disappoint others with its rather too-frequent focus on Bergman as mother rather than on Bergman’s craft as actor, suggesting a missed opportunity to explore a complex stage and screen presence. Still, the actress’s evergreen popularity means the film will be well traveled, though audiences catching the 58-minute small screen version may be equally satisfied.

The lack of any significant investigation into performance styles is acutely felt, particularly given the very different methods of her major directors: George Cukor, Alfred Hitchcock, Roberto Rossellini, Jean Renoir, Stanley Donen, Ingmar Bergman. There’s some light personality analysis — she was driven, she was shy, »

- Jay Weissberg

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Weekly Rushes. 24 June 2015

24 June 2015 7:27 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.Above, the trailer for Denis Villeneuve's thriller Sicario, which premiered in competition in Cannes.Cinema Scope #63 is about to hit newstands, but a lot of it can be read online: Mark Peranson on Cannes and Miguel Gomes, Adam Cook talks with Corneliu Porumboiu, Jordan Cronk on The Assassin, Chuck Stephens on Gregory Markopoulous, Christoph Huber on Mad Max: Fury Road, and more.Author William Gibson recounts his encounters with Chris Marker's La Jetée.James Horner, the composer of scores for such Hollywood films as 48 Hrs, Aliens, and Titanic, has died at the age of 61.Federic Babina has made a series of "Archidirector" illustrations, imagining houses designed in the style of filmmakers like David Lynch and Stanley Kubrick.Sight & Sound has exclusive images from the production of Ben Rivers' new movie, »

- Notebook

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Oscar-Nominated Actor Biggest Professional Regret: Turning Down 'Doctor Who'

19 June 2015 4:25 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody in Mel Brooks' 'The Twelve Chairs.' The 'Doctor Who' that never was. Ron Moody: 'Doctor Who' was biggest professional regret (See previous post: "Ron Moody: From Charles Dickens to Walt Disney – But No Harry Potter.") Ron Moody was featured in about 50 television productions, both in the U.K. and the U.S., from the late 1950s to 2012. These included guest roles in the series The Avengers, Gunsmoke, Starsky and Hutch, Hart to Hart, and Murder She Wrote, in addition to leads in the short-lived U.S. sitcom Nobody's Perfect (1980), starring Moody as a Scotland Yard detective transferred to the San Francisco Police Department, and in the British fantasy Into the Labyrinth (1981), with Moody as the noble sorcerer Rothgo. Throughout the decades, he could also be spotted in several TV movies, among them:[1] David Copperfield (1969). As Uriah Heep in this disappointing all-star showcase distributed theatrically in some countries. »

- Andre Soares

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‘Bates Motel’s’ Vera Farmiga on Physically Demanding Combat Scenes and 6 Other Emmy Contender Quickies

19 June 2015 12:35 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Vera Farmiga‘s dynamic performance as unstable single mom Norma Bates in A&E original series “Bates Motel” demands attention as an Emmy contender for best actress in a drama — perhaps even more so now than when she was first nominated for the role in 2013. Over three seasons, Farmiga has portrayed Norma’s emotional unraveling as her serial-killer son Norman Bates (Freddie Highmore) slowly evolves into the character so familiar to fans of Alfred Hitchcock‘s 1960 horror classic “Psycho.” Norma scrapes and claws — often literally — to save her son from murder charges, drug dealers and his own spiraling mental health, »

- Kathy Zerbib

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Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs To Be Feted By Italy’s Ischia Global Fest

19 June 2015 2:05 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome – Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences president Cheryl Boone Isaacs will be feted by Italy’s Ischia Global Film and Music Fest with its “Ischia Art Award” in recognition of the Academy’s longstanding commitment to the advancement and preservation of motion pictures.

Isaacs (pictured), the first African American and only the third woman to hold the position of Academy prexy, will attend the Ischia Social Cinema Forum on human rights, chaired by Trudie Styler, producer and founder of the Rainforest Foundation, during the 13th Edition of the informal fest to be held July 11-19 on the Italian island off the coast of Naples.

She will receive the award on July 18. 

The Ischia Social Cinema Forum will also include prominent personalities active in charities such as Kerry Kennedy (Robert Kennedy Foundation); Oscar-winning director Paul Haggis, with his association Artists for Peace and Justice supported by David Belle (Cine’ Institute of Jacmel, »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Daily | Buster, Clarke, Ferrara

16 June 2015 9:56 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In today's roundup of news and views: Charlie Fox on Buster Keaton, Danny Leigh on Alan Clarke, Abel Ferrara on collaboration, Adrian Martin on the "New Cinephilia," Martin Amis on Martin Scorsese's Goodfellas, Sérgio Dias Branco on Roberto Rossellini's The Flowers of St. Francis, Peter Cowie on Ingmar Bergman's cinematographers, Gunnar Fischer and Sven Nykvist, Benjamin Bergholtz on Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, Ignatiy Vishnevetsky on Michael Mann's Heat, David Kalat on Harry Langdon, Duncan Gray on Brad Bird's Tomorrowland—and more. » - David Hudson »

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Bates Motel: two more seasons ordered

16 June 2015 12:27 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We hope you’ve been enjoying your stay at Bates Motel – two more seasons of the Psycho prequel have been ordered…

Good news, Bates Motel fans – the show has just been extended for two more seasons. This move will bring us to five seasons, with a few news sites already jumping to the conclusion that season 5 will be the show’s last.

Indeed, perhaps the intention of this double season order is for the writing team to map out a two-year endgame. That’s not been confirmed by any official sources, though. Many expect that the show will start linking up with the events of Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho at some point soon, but only time will tell on that one.

Anyone who follows American network TV news won’t find this information as a huge surprise. Although the ratings for Bates Motel have gradually decreased, the show has fared »

- rleane

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'Psycho': 25 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About Hitchcock's Classic

15 June 2015 11:00 PM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Besides making people forever afraid of motel-room showers, Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho" continues to have an incalculable impact on popular culture. Though it was released 55 years ago this week (on June 16, 1960), it continues to inspire filmmakers and TV producers. In just the last three years, we've seen the 2012 film "Hitchcock" (based on Stephen Rebello's book "Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of 'Psycho,'" and starring Anthony Hopkins as the director and Scarlett Johansson as Janet Leigh) and the ongoing A&E TV prequel drama series, "Bates Motel."

Still, for all of the "Psycho" trivia revealed in "Hitchcock," the biopic barely scratches the surface of how the film got made, from the men who inspired the invention of Norman Bates, to the trickery Hitchcock used to tease the press while keeping the film's convention-shredding narrative twists a secret, to the film's unlikely connection to "Leave It to Beaver." Here, »

- Gary Susman

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Bates Motel Renewed for Two More Seasons, The Returned Cancelled

15 June 2015 11:35 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Our stay at the Bates Motel has just been extended for two more seasons, so remember to close the curtains when you take a shower! A&E made a bold move today in renewing the series through Season 5, which though not explicitly stated as being the show’s last, is fairly likely. A&E has tried (and failed) to launch other dark dramas like the almost immediately cancelled Those Who Kill, and the one-season wonder The Returned. And while Bates Motel has been operating at a ratings loss since its premiere, the network seems confident in creator and producer Carlton Cuse, and his vision for the series. [caption id="attachment_445719" align="alignright" width="300"] Image via A&E[/caption] Bates Motel has somehow, wonderfully, found a way to really draw out the tension of Norman Bates (Freddie Highmore) turning into the killer Norman we know from Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho. (For example, hardly anything of real consequence happened »

- Allison Keene

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100 Essential Action Scenes: Attacks!

11 June 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Sound on Sight undertook a massive project, compiling ranked lists of the most influential, unforgettable, and exciting action scenes in all of cinema. There were hundreds of nominees spread across ten different categories and a multi-week voting process from 11 of our writers. The results: 100 essential set pieces, sequences, and scenes from blockbusters to cult classics to arthouse obscurities.

If you’ve seen a film montage in the last 10 years, then you’ve been witness to at least one of the scenes mentioned on this list: the vibrating water glass from Jurassic Park signaling the T-Rex prowling nearby. It’s the perfect type of image to tell the audience: something is coming. These flashes of exhilaration are fan-favorites, and it’s no surprise to see them featured prominently as the centerpieces for some of the greatest films ever. It’s the invasion when the aliens come out of the sky, the »

- Shane Ramirez

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Holocaust cinema: why film-makers are revisiting a never-to-be-forgotten hell

10 June 2015 10:19 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Auschwitz-set Son of Saul is focusing the film industry’s attention on the wartime atrocities committed by the Nazis – and it couldn’t be more relevant

“No one could bear to look at these things without losing their sanity,” said Wg Sebald, just before he died in 2001: he was talking about the Holocaust, and specifically the numerous acts of bestial persecution visited on the Nazi’s unfortunate victims. This has been a preoccupation of film-makers too, ever since the first newsreels emerged from concentration camps after their liberation. The desire to show, to tell, to educate, comes up against decency, taste and revulsion. What purpose, exactly, is served by documenting and/or recreating unwatchably violent and horrible images: hapless civilians murdered in their millions; shot, beaten, starved and tortured in greater numbers than ever believed possible; an entire national civilisation that prided itself on its sophistication undergoing the most spectacular moral breakdown in history. »

- Andrew Pulver

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

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