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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998

1-20 of 181 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Lunchtime Poll: Multiple Acting Oscars

10 hours ago | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

I was all prepared to list the most Oscar winning Actors for a quickie top ten list. Until I remembered there were only six with 3 or more Oscars (for acting)

Four Leading Oscars

01 Katharine Hepburn

Three Leading Oscars

02 Daniel Day-Lewis

Three Oscars (Lead/Supporting Mix)

[Three-Way Tie]

03 Ingrid Bergman

03 Meryl Streep

03 Jack Nicholson

Three Oscars (Supporting)

06 Walter Brennan

Your Task: Make it a top ten by filling slots seven through ten. Name the four actors who most deserve to join them as three-timers or the ones who seem most likely? »

- NATHANIEL R

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The Past, Present, and Future of Real-Time Films Part Two

17 October 2014 8:00 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Sidney And The Sixties: Real-time 1957-1966

Throughout the 1950s, Hollywood’s relationship with television was fraught: TV was a hated rival but also a source of cheap talent and material, as in the case of the small-scale Marty (1955), which won the Best Picture Oscar. These contradictions were well represented by the apparently “televisual” 12 Angry Men (1957), which began life as a teleplay concerning a jury with a lone holdout who must, and eventually does, convince his fellow jurors of the defendant’s innocence. Its writer, Reginald Rose, persuaded one of Hollywood’s biggest stars, Henry Fonda, to become a first-time producer of the film version. Fonda and Rose took basement-low salaries in favor of future points, and hired a TV director, Sidney Lumet, for next to nothing because Lumet wanted a first feature credit. Technically, there’s an opening bit on the courtroom steps that keeps this from being a true real-time film, »

- Daniel Smith-Rowsey

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A Year with Kate: Rooster Cogburn (1975)

15 October 2014 12:30 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 42 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn and John Wayne star in The African Queen 2: This Time it's a Western!

Growing old in Hollywood sucks. To borrow a line from Goldie Hawn, “There are only three ages for women in Hollywood: babe, district attorney, and Driving Miss Daisy.” And while Hollywood’s ageism is well-documented and well-criticized, for some aging actors, an equally tricky problem can arise: the trouble with becoming a Legend in your own time. What happens when the legend eclipses the actor?

In 1975, Hepburn was arguably more popular than she’d ever been. This was due in no small part to her friend Garson Kanin’s unauthorized, best-selling 1972 “tell all” entitled Tracy And Hepburn: An Intimate Memoir. Though shocked by the invasion of her privacy, Kate used the public interest that the book generated to fuel her career, appearing on talk shows and even the 1974 Academy Awards (in pants, »

- Anne Marie

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Remembering Superman Reeve Ten Years After His Death

10 October 2014 5:50 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Christopher Reeve: 'Superman' and his movies (photo: Christopher Reeve in 'Superman' 1978) Christopher Reeve, Superman in four movies from 1978 to 1987, died ten years ago today. In 1995, while taking part in a cross-country horse race in Culpeper, Virginia, Reeve was thrown off his horse, hitting his head on the top rail of a jump; the near-fatal accident left him paralyzed from the neck down. He ultimately succumbed to heart failure at age 52 on October 10, 2004. Long before he was cast as Superman aka Clark Kent, the Manhattan-born (as Christopher D'Olier Reeve on September 25, 1952), Cornell University and Juillard School for Drama alumnus was an ambitious young actor whose theatrical apprenticeship included, while still a teenager, some time as an observer at London's Old Vic and Paris' Comédie Française. At age 23, he landed his first Broadway role in a production of Enid Bagnold's A Matter of Gravity, starring Katharine Hepburn. »

- Andre Soares

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Something blue, part 2 by Anne-Katrin Titze

9 October 2014 6:35 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Director and star Mathieu Amalric in The Blue Room: "I thought a lot of the usual suspects. A man sitting and looking, and he is not listening."

Mathieu Amalric's The Blue Room (La Chambre Bleue) is based on Georges Simenon's novel. Amalric stars with Stéphanie Cléau, Léa Drucker with Serge Bozon, Mona Jaffart, Laurent Poitrenaux and Blutch in his whodunnit with a question mark for each molded part - the who, the done and especially the it.

David Lynch's Lost Highway - William Holden's death - Gene Hackman and Kevin Costner in Roger Donaldson's No Way Out form a thread. Katharine Hepburn on a ladder climbing up to Cary Grant in Howard Hawks' Bringing Up Baby, editing with François Gédigier and Bozon's voice are heard in part 2 of our conversation.

Anne-Katrin Titze: You mentioned how quickly Simenon wrote the book and you also said »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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A Year with Kate: Love Among The Ruins (1975)

8 October 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 41 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn does a TV movie with Laurence Olivier and George Cukor, which might have been disappointing if it wasn't so good.

Whew! What a nice change of pace this breezy little comedy is after so many dramas. Don't get me wrong, I love Great Actresses performing Great Roles in Great Films, but sometimes you just want to curl up on the couch with a glass of wine and laugh with your friend Katie, y'know? It's been 2 months since our last comedy (or less, depending on whether you laugh as hard as I do during The Lion in Winter), and I for one was cautiously excited to see Kate return to comedic form in Love Among The Ruins.

I say "cautiously excited" because even though so many of you pointed out how good this movie is, its existence a TV movie (albeit an Emmy Award-winning one) depressed me. »

- Anne Marie

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A Year with Kate: The Glass Menagerie (1973)

1 October 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 40 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn takes to TV to show that Laurette Taylor can eat her heart out.

Apparently Kate adapted to TV quickly. Mere months after her first two part television interview on The Dick Cavett Show, Katharine Hepburn returned to the small screen, this time to act. Director Anthony Harvey (last teamed with Kate directing The Lion in Winter) did away with the more fantastical elements of the play in order to get a more "natural" feel, relying on strong acting rather than stagecraft. Nonetheless, The Glass Menagerie remains a touching work of nostalgia and regret that comments in unexpected ways on its legendary lead actress’s life.

When The Glass Menagerie premiered in 1944, Laurette Taylor’s performance as Southern matriarch Amanda Wingfield effectively revolutionized American theatrical acting. In her second foray into Williams’ world, Katharine Hepburn steps out of Taylor’s long shadow. Hepburn's Amanda is not a dreamer, »

- Anne Marie

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Something blue, part 1 by Anne-Katrin Titze

1 October 2014 9:59 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

The Blue Room director Mathieu Amalric with Anne-Katrin Titze: "What is incredible is that, yes, the bee is in [George Simenon's] novel on the belly." Photo: Charlie Olsky

Mathieu Amalric's The Blue Room (La Chambre Bleue), based on Georges Simenon's novel, stars Stéphanie Cléau, Léa Drucker with Serge Bozon, Mona Jaffart, Laurent Poitrenaux and Blutch. Amalric recently starred with Emmanuelle Seigner in Roman Polanski's Venus in Fur.

The morning after the North American premiere at the New York Film Festival, we discussed Simenon's love of Stendahl, leaving a message for composer John Zorn, Katharine Hepburn on a ladder, adapting Eric Reinhardt for the stage, William Holden's death in connection to David Lynch, Gene Hackman and Kevin Costner, bees and shoes.

Léa Drucker as Delphine Gahyde

Vladimir Nabokov warned in Transparent Things "When we concentrate on a material object, whatever its situation, the very act of attention may »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Daily | Cronenberg, Lynch, Maddin

29 September 2014 5:35 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Jonathan Lethem's reviewed David Cronenberg's first novel, Consumed, for the New York Times. Also in today's roundup of news and views: Morgan Meis on David Lynch's paintings and films; Jonathan Rosenbaum on Guy Maddin's The Saddest Music in the World (2003); Adrian Martin on Emir Kusturica's Arizona Dream (1993); Reverse Shot on three films by Martin Scorsese; Nick Pinkerton on Hype Williams's Belly (1998); and from the New Yorker's archive, six classic profiles: Diane Keaton, Angela Bassett, Julia Roberts, Tilda Swinton, Katharine Hepburn and Cate Blanchett. » - David Hudson »

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A Year With Kate: A Delicate Balance (1973)

24 September 2014 10:30 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 39 of 52:  In which Katharine Hepburn stars in an Edward Albee play that's not Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and does her first television interview.

When you hear “Pulitzer Prize winning drama by Edward Albee,” you probably don’t imagine a play as self-conscious as A Delicate Balance. In Tony Richardson’s chilly movie adaptation, Agnes (our own Kate) and Tobias (Paul Scofield) try desperately to keep pretenses of civility intact. Early on, Agnes debates the possibility of losing her mind - a fall into chaos she worries that she’s tipping precariously towards. Her issue is not how it will feel, but how it will look. What will her husband do? Order, or the semblance of it, must be kept. Civilization is built on such shaky foundations.

A Delicate Balance appears, for its first hour at least, impenetrable, impersonal, and pretty dull.  The supposedly welcoming home is bathed in cold overhead light, »

- Anne Marie

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Artist Don Bachardy's New Book Hollywood Features Over 300 Original Celebrity Portraits

19 September 2014 | The Daily BLAM! | See recent The Daily BLAM! news »

Hollywood is the highly anticipated monograph of celebrated portrait artist Don Bachardy. With more than 300 original paintings and drawings, this stunning collection features the most famous actors and influential figures in Hollywood including directors, screenwriters, cinematographers, costumers, producers, and agents. As the longtime partner of English novelist Christopher Isherwood, Bachardy had early access to Hollywood’s elite. Bette Davis, Ian McKellen, Fred Astaire, Rita Hayworth, Katherine Hepburn, Mia Farrow, Jack Nicholson, Brooke Shields, and Patrick Swayze are rendered in the most sublime way, with bold strokes of blue, vivid splashes of pink and red, or featherlike pencil and bold charcoal sketches. A lifelong Hollywood native, Bachardy has been capturing stars for over »

- Pietro Filipponi

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Oprah, Vanessa Williams, and other stars who got their start in beauty pageants

14 September 2014 2:42 PM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

While Miss America hasn’t bred any headline-stealing celebrities recently, beauty pageants were once a place where future stars got their start. Oprah was Miss Black Tennessee; Halle Berry was Miss Ohio. Vanessa Williams made it all the way to the top, nabbing the Miss America title in 1984.

With Miss America’s 88th annual pageant airing Sunday on ABC at 9 p.m. Et, EW took a look at the most famous Oscar winners and television icons who once won crowns and sashes:

Cloris Leachman

Leachman represented Chicago in 1946’s Miss America pageant and, though she didn’t win the ultimate crown, »

- Ariana Bacle

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“The idea of the film is to be happy and positive” – Sonam Kapoor

13 September 2014 10:32 PM, PDT | Bollyspice | See recent Bollyspice news »

Sonam Kapoor is living many girls dreams and becoming a Disney princess if the film Khoobsurat has a happily ever after ending, which we are guessing it does. A new version of the Rekha starrer (!980) of the same name, this time the heroine is not in the house of an army man but goes into the house of a royal family. Her prince is played by Pakistani actor Fawad Khan making his debut in Hindi films.

The Disney Utv produced film, which hits theaters on Friday September 19th, is a quirky, modern romantic comedy about what happens when a vibrant, hopelessly romantic physiotherapist meets a handsome young Rajput prince who is the complete opposite of her – and is engaged to someone else. It is a battle of values between two individually crazy families — one that encourages discipline and self-restraint versus the other, which is all for spontaneity and open-mindedness.

Sonam »

- Stacey Yount

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Ellen Pompeo says she might be done with acting after 'Grey's Anatomy'

11 September 2014 7:29 AM, PDT | EW - Inside TV | See recent EW.com - Inside TV news »

Ellen Pompeo is still going strong as Grey’s Anatomy lead character Meredith Grey after 10 seasons on the show, but she might be done acting when Grey’s is done airing.

The actress talked candidly about her future in the business when she appeared at a BuzzFeed Brews event Wednesday that also hosted the two leads of Shonda Rhimes’ other dramas, Scandal’s Kerry Washington and How to Get Away with Murder’s Viola Davis.

“I definitely don’t have a strong desire to act after Grey’s. I definitely feel myself transitioning,” Pompeo said. “I don’t find acting terribly empowering. »

- Ariana Bacle

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A Year with Kate: The Madwoman of Chaillot (1969)

10 September 2014 2:30 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 37 of 52:  In which Katharine Hepburn plays another aristocrat in an odd little movie that makes no sense.

1969 was a really weird year for Kate. At age 62, she’d achieved commercial and critical success unlike any she’d experienced before. The Lion in Winter and Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner had not only earned Katharine Hepburn back-to-back Oscars, but also made her one of the top grossing stars of 1968. But as the 60s blossomed into the 70s, Kate took two very strange steps: an allegory, and a musical. Limitations be damned, she was Kate the Great, and she hadn’t had a flop in 15 years. That was about to change.

The Madwoman of Chaillot works as a curio, but not as a film. Based on a postwar French allegory, “updated” to include topical issues such as student riots and atomic power, the resulting movie is one Be In »

- Anne Marie

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Gardner, Crawford Among Academy's Career Achievement Award Non-Winners

4 September 2014 3:08 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Honorary Award: Gloria Swanson, Rita Hayworth among dozens of women bypassed by the Academy (photo: Honorary Award non-winner Gloria Swanson in 'Sunset Blvd.') (See previous post: "Honorary Oscars: Doris Day, Danielle Darrieux Snubbed.") Part three of this four-part article about the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Honorary Award bypassing women basically consists of a long, long — and for the most part quite prestigious — list of deceased women who, some way or other, left their mark on the film world. Some of the names found below are still well known; others were huge in their day, but are now all but forgotten. Yet, just because most people (and the media) suffer from long-term — and even medium-term — memory loss, that doesn't mean these women were any less deserving of an Honorary Oscar. So, among the distinguished female film professionals in Hollywood and elsewhere who have passed away without »

- Andre Soares

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A Year with Kate: The Lion in Winter (1968)

3 September 2014 3:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 36 of 52: In which if there’s only one Katharine Hepburn film you see, make it this one.

When you take Screenwriting 101, your first lesson is the Three Act Story Structure. Act 1: Introduction. Act 2: Conflict. Act 3: Climax (and hopefully Resolution). If I were to so arrange the lives of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine, it would roughly look as follows: Act 1: Eleanor and Henry II fall in love. Act 2: Eleanor and Henry fall out of love and into battle. Act 3: The Lion in Winter

James Goldman’s script starts in media res, with Eleanor of Aquitaine (our own Kate) and Henry II (Peter O’Toole) already at the end of two civil wars and any pretense of civility. Knives are out as everyone prepares to fight at the Christmas court at Chinon. Joining them are their three angry sons--Richard (Anthony Hopkins »

- Anne Marie

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A Year with Kate: Guess Who's Coming To Dinner (1967)

27 August 2014 11:45 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 35 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn wins her second Oscar and loses Spencer Tracy.

Today is the first of many goodbyes we’ll have to say on this series. After the success of Long Day’s Journey Into Night, with critics declaring her one of the greatest screen actresses of her generation, Kate disappeared for five years to take care of her partner of three decades, Spencer Tracy. It was the longest break she’d taken since she started making movies in 1932, not even her infamous “Box Office Poison” drought had lasted longer than 3 years. But the news was bleak: Spencer Tracy was dying.

Spencer Tracy’s health started declining rapidly in 1961. By 1967, he was in such poor health that the studios considered him uninsurable. Everyone working on Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner knew that this would be his last film. As a result, when Spencer Tracy died 17 days after shooting wrapped, »

- Anne Marie

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A Year with Kate: Long Day's Journey Into Night (1962)

20 August 2014 1:01 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

 Episode 34 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn enters the golden age of her career.

This late in A Year With Kate, I really didn’t think I could be surprised anymore. After 8 months watching 34 movies spread over 3 decades of Katharine Hepburn’s life, I believed that I had a pretty firm grasp on who Kate the Great was and how she performed. I espoused the popular wisdom that Kate was best when she played women similar to herself: strong women, smart women; women rarely beaten and never broken. None of these could prepare me for Mary Tyrone, the morphine addict in Eugene O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night. Katharine Hepburn, for the first and possibly last time in her career, played a completely crushed woman, and it’s unlike anything else she ever put to film.

Before you rush out to rent a copy, a warning: »

- Anne Marie

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On TCM: Oscar Winner Colbert

18 August 2014 8:25 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Claudette Colbert movies on Turner Classic Movies: From ‘The Smiling Lieutenant’ to TCM premiere ‘Skylark’ (photo: Claudette Colbert and Maurice Chevalier in ‘The Smiling Lieutenant’) Claudette Colbert, the studio era’s perky, independent-minded — and French-born — "all-American" girlfriend (and later all-American wife and mother), is Turner Classic Movies’ star of the day today, August 18, 2014, as TCM continues with its "Summer Under the Stars" film series. Colbert, a surprise Best Actress Academy Award winner for Frank Capra’s 1934 comedy It Happened One Night, was one Paramount’s biggest box office draws for more than decade and Hollywood’s top-paid female star of 1938, with reported earnings of $426,944 — or about $7.21 million in 2014 dollars. (See also: TCM’s Claudette Colbert day in 2011.) Right now, TCM is showing Ernst Lubitsch’s light (but ultimately bittersweet) romantic comedy-musical The Smiling Lieutenant (1931), a Best Picture Academy Award nominee starring Maurice Chevalier as a French-accented Central European lieutenant in »

- Andre Soares

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