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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998

1-20 of 203 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


A Year with Kate: Love Affair (1994)

3 hours ago | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 51 of 52: In which In which Katharine Hepburn gives her blessing to Annette Bening and my inner actressexual weeps with joy.

A man and a woman bump into each other on a transatlantic flight. He’s charmed. She’s unimpressed. They both wear impeccably tailored suits. She banters. He flirts. A freak accident lands them on a Russian cruise ship. Their banter gives way to conversation. Their flirtation leads to longing looks and rose-tinted kisses. They both fall in love. But they’re engaged to other people.

If the opening to Love Affair sounds familiar, that’s because it is. It’s not a Tracy/Hepburn comedy, nor a Bogie/Bacall noir. In fact, it’s a remake of a remake, told first in 1939 (Love Affair starring Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer), then in 1957 (An Affair to Remember starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr), and later canonized in Nora Ephron »

- Anne Marie

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'Gone With the Wind' Facts: 25 Things You Never Knew About the Most Popular Movie Ever Made

16 December 2014 4:30 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Seventy-five years after the premiere of "Gone With the Wind" (on December 15, 1939), it seems that nothing -- not the passage of time, not the movie's controversial racial politics, not the film's daunting length, and not even the release of certain James Cameron global blockbusters -- can diminish the romantic Civil War drama's stature as the most popular movie of all time.

The film is certainly a formidable artistic achievement, a cornerstone of movie history, and a highlight of a year so full of landmark films that 1939 has often been called the greatest year in the history of Hollywood filmmaking. Each viewing of the four-hour epic seems to reveal new details. Still, even longtime "Gwtw" fans may not know the behind-the-scenes story of the film, one as lengthy and tumultuous as the on-screen romance between Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh) and Rhett Butler (Clark Gable). Producer David O. Selznick spent fortunes, hired »

- Gary Susman

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A Year with Kate: This Can't Be Love (1994)

10 December 2014 11:21 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 50 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn starred in a movie with Jason Bateman, which will make every game of Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon you play significantly easier.

This is it. We’ve reached the final year of Katharine Hepburn’s career. Did Kate know that the three films she made in 1994 would be her last? Did she feel herself slowing down and decide that sixty two years in the spotlight were enough? Since she made no official announcement, it’s impossible to know Kate’s reasons for sure. Still, considering this was Kate’s last starring role, This Can’t Be Love feels like a retirement announcement.

Kate’s first final film was This Can’t Be Love, another TV movie starring Katharine Hepburn as Katharine Hepburn. Actually, she plays Marion Bennett, a world-renowned, Academy Award-winning actress who eschews public life and spends a lot of time »

- Anne Marie

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Several of Grant's Best Films Tonight on TCM:

8 December 2014 5:45 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Cary Grant movies: 'An Affair to Remember' does justice to its title (photo: Cary Grant ca. late 1940s) Cary Grant excelled at playing Cary Grant. This evening, fans of the charming, sophisticated, debonair actor — not to be confused with the Bristol-born Archibald Leach — can rejoice, as no less than eight Cary Grant movies are being shown on Turner Classic Movies, including a handful of his most successful and best-remembered star vehicles from the late '30s to the late '50s. (See also: "Cary Grant Classics: TCM Presentation" and "Cary Grant and Randolph Scott: Gay Lovers?") The evening begins with what may well be Cary Grant's best-known film, An Affair to Remember. This 1957 romantic comedy-melodrama is unusual in that it's an even more successful remake of a previous critical and box-office hit — the 1939 release Love Affair — and that it was directed by the same man who »

- Andre Soares

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Meryl Streep Lands Oscar Noms, but How Do Her Films Stack Up?

4 December 2014 9:03 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor 

Meryl Streep holds the record for the most Oscar acting nominations with 18 — Jack Nicholson and Katherine Hepburn are tied for second with 12 each — and could potentially break her own record with a 19th nomination for Disney’s adaptation of Into the Woods. The Hollywood Reporter’s Scott Feinberg said Streep “steals every scene in which she appears as The Witch.”

Though Streep hasn’t gone more than five years without landing an Oscar nomination since 1979 — the longest break was between 1990’s Postcards from the Edge and 1995’s The Bridges of Madison County — her movies haven’t fared the same. Three of her 18 films scored best picture nominations, all of which won, while four of the films were nominated solely for her performance.

Streep scored her first Oscar nomination in 1979 for her supporting role in The Deer Hunter (1978), which was only her second feature film. The film won five Oscars, »

- Anjelica Oswald

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A Year with Kate: The Man Upstairs (1992)

3 December 2014 12:33 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 49 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn, octogenarian and Academy Award-winning legend, wrestles a convict and wins.

“You’re too old not to be interesting,” Ryan O’Neal tells Katharine Hepburn midway through The Man Upstairs. As the 1980s rolled into the 1990s, that certainly turned out to be the case for Kate. The formerly private star was now the subject of documentaries, interviews, and the 1990 Kennedy Centers Honors. When she released her autobiography Me: Stories of My Life in 1992, it would have been fair to say that Kate was the busiest recluse in the business.

By this time, there had been so many biographies, interviews, and fictionalizations of her life--of which The Man Upstairs would prove to be another example--so Katharine Hepburn’s autobiography was her chance to set her life in stone once and for all. Told in Hepburn’s typical forthright, conversational style, Me: Stories From My »

- Anne Marie

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Cate Blanchett Covers "Porter"

1 December 2014 5:44 PM, PST | SneakPeek | See recent SneakPeek news »

Sneak Peek new images of Australian actress Cate Blanchett ("The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies") in the November 2014 issue of "Porter Magazine", photographed by Ryan McGinley:

Blanchett has won two 'Academy Awards', three 'Screen Actors Guild Awards', three 'Golden Globe Awards' and three 'BAFTA Awards'. 

She was also appointed 'Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters' by the French government in 2012. 

Blanchett first gained  international attention for her role as 'Elizabeth I of England' in director Shekhar Kapur's 1998 film "Elizabeth", followed by her portrayal of 'Katharine Hepburn' in Martin Scorsese's 2004 film, "The Aviator".

In 2013, she starred as 'Jasmine Francis' in director Woody Allen's "Blue Jasmine".

Blanchett's other notable films include "The Talented Mr. Ripley" (1999), Peter Jackson's "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy (2001–03) and "The Hobbit" trilogy (2012–14), "Veronica Guerin" (2003), "Babel" (2006), "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (2008), and "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button »

- Michael Stevens

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A Year with Kate: Laura Lansing Slept Here (1988)

26 November 2014 12:00 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 48 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn makes a truly awful houseguest.

Stars! They’re just like us! Except that they aren’t. An entire media industry has been built around bringing our cultural idols closer to us--Twitter alone delivers the illusion of intimacy 140 characters at a time--but at the end of the day, would you actually want to live with one? When George S. Kaufman had to host Radio Personality and Famous Critic Alexander Woollcott for a week, the experience was so aggravating that the playwright and his partner Moss Hart wrote a scathingly funny satire about Woollcott called The Man Who Came To Dinner. I bring this up for two reasons: 1) It’s a great Christmas comedy starring Bette Davis so go watch it right now if you haven’t and 2) This seems to have been more or less James Prideaux’s motivation when he wrote Laura Lansing Slept Here. »

- Anne Marie

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Can Meryl Streep actually win a fourth Oscar for 'Into the Woods?'

23 November 2014 1:52 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

We really shouldn't be having this conversation. It's just too soon. Isn't it? When Meryl Streep won her third Academy Award for "The Iron Lady," the collective media mindset was that the acting icon had finally joined the three-timer club and any other nominations from that point on would be icing on the cake. A fourth Oscar win? Considering how many times she'd been overlooked since winning no. 2 for "Sophie's Choice" in 1982, it just didn't seem realistic that it would happen anytime soon or at all. Even after landing another Best Actress nod for "August: Osage County," the concept of Streep conceivably winning another statue just didn't register. That is, until now. To say that Streep is the standout in Rob Marshall's "Into the Woods" is somewhat of an understatement. Chris Pine does steal almost every scene he's in as the Prince (more on that in a moment), but »

- Gregory Ellwood

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A Year with Kate: Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry (1986)

19 November 2014 2:00 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 47 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn stars in a geriatric version of The Way We Were.

Mrs. Delafield wants to die. The TV movie opens on an ambulance rushing the society widow to the hospital after an unnamed relapse. Obscured by a breathing apparatus and various medical paraphernalia, Mrs. Delafield lies comatose as her children begin to mourn and divvy up her estate. Her neighbor waxes elegiac on the imminent elegancy of her death. Then, a handsome doctor puts a hand on her shoulder and--miracle of miracles! Mrs. Delafield opens her eyes! And then, out of nowhere, it becomes a marriage comedy.

After last week’s morbid misfire of a movie, the opening of Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry feels a little like purposeful trolling. Grace Quigley extolled the virtues of death for the elderly with an ailing Hepburn at its center, but Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry celebrates »

- Anne Marie

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Honey, time marches on and eventually you realize it is marchin' across your blog.

19 November 2014 5:00 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Stereogum interviews musician Tunde Adebimpe, the groom from Rachel Getting Married. He says Paul Thomas Anderson (!!!) was originally going to play his part.

Dissolve the Russo brothers who did such a great job with Captain America Winter Soldier may be staying with Marvel unto infinity. And Infinity Wars

BadAss Digest kind of a dick move that DC announced a Flash movie shortly after The Flash series opened to great numbers but with a different actor. The star of CW's Arrow objects

Geek x Girls Dance off from Guardians of the Galaxy takes a detour with Lee Pace

Coming Soon Interstellar prequel comic

/Film 30 movies coming to TV from worst to best ideas

THR Madonna isn't done directing Her next project Ade: A Love Story has a writer

Mnpp Lmao! Which is hotter, Andrew Garfield or...?

Film School Rejects shares 7 movie scenes where actors imitated other actors. Amusing but why no ladies? »

- NATHANIEL R

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First Best Actress and Best Actor Academy Award Winners Tonight

17 November 2014 5:12 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

First Best Actor Oscar winner Emil Jannings and first Best Actress Oscar winner Janet Gaynor on TCM (photo: Emil Jannings in 'The Last Command') First Best Actor Academy Award winner Emil Jannings in The Last Command, first Best Actress Academy Award winner Janet Gaynor in Sunrise, and sisters Norma Talmadge and Constance Talmadge are a few of the silent era performers featured this evening on Turner Classic Movies, as TCM continues with its Silent Monday presentations. Starting at 5 p.m. Pt / 8 p.m. Et on November 17, 2014, get ready to check out several of the biggest movie stars of the 1920s. Following the Jean Negulesco-directed 1943 musical short Hit Parade of the Gay Nineties — believe me, even the most rabid anti-gay bigot will be able to enjoy this one — TCM will be showing Josef von Sternberg's The Last Command (1928) one of the two movies that earned the Swiss-born »

- Andre Soares

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‘Selma’ Could Become the Fifteenth Race-Related Film to Land a Best Picture Oscar Nom

14 November 2014 11:24 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor 

Originally planned to screen as a 30-minute preview at AFI Fest, Ava DuVernay’s Selma, centered on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights marches from Selma to Montgomery, premiered in its entirety and stirred up more Oscar buzz ahead of its Christmas Day release.

The Hollywood Reporter’s Stephen Farber says the film is “intelligently written, vividly shot, tightly edited and sharply acted,” and that it “represents a rare example of craftsmanship working to produce a deeply moving piece of history.” Meanwhile, Paul Webb’s screenplay and David Oyelowo’s portrayal of Dr. King have been praised. The Wrap’s James Rocchi says, “Oyelowo’s performance would be impressive enough if it merely recreated the icon we now revere as perfectly as he does through a variety of methods… But Oyelowo, and Webb’s screenplay, also give us a rich, rewarding portrait of King as a man, »

- Anjelica Oswald

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Brad Pitt Says 'Fury' Part of His "Mandate" to Push Smaller Films

12 November 2014 10:38 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

"If I like the film, then I know at least one person likes that film," said Brad Pitt quoting a famous line from Katherine Hepburn to underline why he has a responsibility to push smaller, more complex films.  Pitt landed in Seoul on Wednesday to promote Fury, which opens here on Nov. 13 and he sees David Ayer's WWII tank actioner in a similar vein to the Oscar-winning 12 Years a Slave, in that both are small but challenging films that often get overlooked in Hollywood. "In Hollywood, big, more commercial films are being made and the smaller, more complex difficult subject matters where directors are reaching out for

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- Lee Hyo-won

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A Year with Kate: Grace Quigley (1984)

12 November 2014 11:01 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

 Episode 46 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn makes a comedy about suicide with Nick Nolte because she's a living legend and she can do whatever she wants.

The truth about a career that spans seven decades, is that for the majority of that career, you'll be what’s traditionally thought of as “old.” Hollywood does not like “old.” The magnificent part of watching Katharine Hepburn age has been watching her flip old age (and Hollywood) the bird. True, her head wobbles, her hair is gray, and her voice is reedy. Still, she leaps after hot air balloons, bicycles, hauls wood, and even wins Academy Awards at an age far past what would traditionally be considered “her prime.” For the past few years, Kate has looked old, sounded old, and even talked about being old, but the stubbornly energetic woman has never felt old. Which is why Grace Quigley is more than a little scary. »

- Anne Marie

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8 Of The Best Transhumanist Films

6 November 2014 8:42 PM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Lucy arrived in cinemas this summer to much curiosity. With the exception of Michael Bay’s dystopic sci-fi action thriller The Island, Scarlett Johansson’s acting profile had risen mainly on the basis of her roles in the drama genre, with Lost in Translation and The Girl with the Pearl Earring, and collaborations with Woody Allen such as Match Point and Vicky Christina Barcelona being among the most significant (until, of course, she donned the black catsuit and spoke Russian as Natasha Romanoff in Iron Man 2, at which point she could been known for nothing but being a crazy person who wore a toilet seat around her neck and still would have been received as if she was Katherine Hepburn reborn).

So, her sudden shift to more hardcore science fiction, first in Under the Skin (a movie about which some raved, while others had about as much grasp on »

- Rachel North

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The Men Who Would Be Hughes (Plus Hepburn and the end of Rko)

6 November 2014 1:37 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Howard Hughes movies (photo: Leonardo DiCaprio as Howard Hughes in 'The Aviator') Turner Classic Movies will be showing the Howard Hughes-produced, John Farrow-directed, Baja California-set gangster drama His Kind of Woman, starring Robert Mitchum, Hughes discovery Jane Russell, and Vincent Price, at 3 a.m. Pt / 6 a.m. Et on Saturday, November 8, 2014. Hughes produced a couple of dozen movies. (More on that below.) But what about "Howard Hughes movies"? Or rather, movies — whether big-screen or made-for-television efforts — featuring the visionary, eccentric, hypochondriac, compulsive-obsessive, all-American billionaire as a character? Besides Leonardo DiCaprio, who plays a dashing if somewhat unbalanced Hughes in Martin Scorsese's 2004 Best Picture Academy Award-nominated The Aviator, other actors who have played Howard Hughes on film include the following: Tommy Lee Jones in William A. Graham's television movie The Amazing Howard Hughes (1977), with Lee Purcell as silent film star Billie Dove, Tovah Feldshuh as Katharine Hepburn, »

- Andre Soares

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A Year with Kate: On Golden Pond (1981)

5 November 2014 9:40 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 45 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn makes Oscars history by asserting that old people are interesting.

I’ll be honest: I’ve been really nervous to write about this movie. For the past few weeks, a storm has been brewing in the comments section regarding Kate’s final Oscar win. I’m not one to (intentionally) court controversy, so I’ve been debating all week how to best give a safe space to the righteous fury of the Oscars experts while also celebrating an important moment in Oscars history. Because whether you believe Kate deserved to win or not, this was a record-breaking win at the Academy Awards, and that shouldn’t go unappreciated.

Here’s my plan: we’ll speculate wildly for a bit on why Kate took home her fourth Academy Award (by “took home” I mean “still refused to accept in person”). Then you tell me »

- Anne Marie

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A Year with Kate: The Corn is Green (1978)

29 October 2014 9:24 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

 Episode 44 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn bids farewell to her lifelong friend and director, George Cukor.

Who’s up for another catfight? Way back near the beginning of this series, I manufactured a rivalry between young Kate Hepburn and Miss Bette Davis, both sporting ear-splitting accents in two movies from 1934. This time, I don’t have to fake a competition. Katharine Hepburn’s 1979 TV movie happens to be a remake of a 1945 Bette Davis film.

The Corn Is Green (based on the play by by Emlyn Williams) is the story of Miss Moffat, who gets off her tuffet to teach the Welsh miners to read. The role of a strong-willed woman who changes the lives of her impoverished pupils would be catnip for either of our great actresses, so it’s no surprise that Bette and Kate both played Miss Moffat 34 years apart. What is surprising is how different »

- Anne Marie

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Television: The Future of Cinema?

28 October 2014 10:03 PM, PDT | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

 

Since the development of the moving picture camera in the late 19th century, the world, especially Americans, has been fascinated by the silver screen. For a time, people shut out the cold reality of the Great Depression with Shirley Temple's iconic curls, and legends such as Errol Flynn, Gregory Peck, and Katherine Hepburn roamed Hollywood lots and ordered Cobb salads at the Brown Derby. For awhile it seemed that our infatuation with Hollywood would never end, but the most recent decade has seen both its revenue and cultural significance decline, and many industry experts are scrambling to understand how movies have slipped from the spotlight. Internal changes show that studios have reinvested quite a bit of their resources into television production, and although Hollywood has been a television oriented town since the late -1950s, it had never stepped on film profits until fairly recently.

Since the true golden »

- Brandon Engel

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998

1-20 of 203 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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