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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1994

6 items from 2016


19 unforgettable soundtrack moments from The X-Files

9 February 2016 11:00 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Sean Wilson looks back at composer Mark Snow’s extraordinary contribution to one of the greatest TV shows of all time…

It was the pop culture sensation of the 1990s – and now it’s back to storm TV screens in the UK (well, Channel 5 anyway). The X-Files initially ran for 10 series’ (in addition to spawning two movies) and introduced us to two of television’s greatest heroes in the form of FBI agents Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson), both dedicated to exposing extraterrestrial and paranormal phenomena lurking amidst the fabric of everyday life.

However, the series wouldn’t have had half its impact without the input of composer Mark Snow, whose haunting music constantly had viewers anticipating what was around the next corner. Here are 19 memorable tracks exploring the rich yet underrated soundtrack history of this landmark show, ones confirming Snow as perhaps the unsung hero of The X-Files. »

- Sean Wilson

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The Only Thing More Beautiful Than the Music of 'Star Trek' Is William Shatner Talking About It (Maybe)

9 February 2016 6:40 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Okay, serious question: Should we call William Shatner a legend? An icon? Or just think of him as an actor, writer, director and producer whose connection to the "Star Trek" franchise will make sure that he's remembered for generations yet to come? Read More: The 13 TV Series Revivals We Least Expected to See Reborn That wasn't something Indiewire got a chance to ask Shatner about when we got him on the phone recently, because what Shatner wanted to talk about was the upcoming "Star Trek - The Ultimate Voyage 50th Anniversary Concert Tour," which brings the music composed by Gerald Fried, Jay Chattaway, Dennis McCarthy, Mark McKenzie, Cliff Eidelman, Ron Jones and Jerry Goldsmith to the United States and Canada as a live theatrical, orchestral experience.  Below, Shatner explains what an actor's relationship to the soundtrack is like, how that changes when you're also directing the project and what makes »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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The Only Thing More Beautiful Than the Music of 'Star Trek' Is William Shatner Talking About It (Maybe)

9 February 2016 6:40 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Okay, serious question: Should we call William Shatner a legend? An icon? Or just think of him as an actor, writer, director and producer whose connection to the "Star Trek" franchise will make sure that he's remembered for generations yet to come? Read More: The 13 TV Series Revivals We Least Expected to See Reborn That wasn't something Indiewire got a chance to ask Shatner about when we got him on the phone recently, because what Shatner wanted to talk about was the upcoming "Star Trek - The Ultimate Voyage 50th Anniversary Concert Tour," which brings the music composed by Gerald Fried, Jay Chattaway, Dennis McCarthy, Mark McKenzie, Cliff Eidelman, Ron Jones and Jerry Goldsmith to the United States and Canada as a live theatrical, orchestral experience.  Below, Shatner explains what an actor's relationship to the soundtrack is like, how that changes when you're also directing the project and what makes »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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TCM's Oscar Series: Phony Oscar-Winning Biopic, Minor Hawn Classic

6 February 2016 3:07 AM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'A Beautiful Mind' with Russell Crowe. '31 Days of Oscar' on TCM: 'The Wind and the Lion,' 'The Man Who Would Be King' Turner Classic Movies' “31 Days of Oscar” continues on Saturday, Feb. 6, '16, with more recent fare – as in, several films released in the last four decades. Among these are The Wind and the Lion, The Man Who Would Be King, A Beautiful Mind, Swing Shift, and Broadcast News. John Milius' The Wind and the Lion and John Huston's The Man Who Would Be King are both 1975 releases featuring “Westerners” (i.e., white people) stranded in “exotic” and potentially dangerous locales (i.e., places inhabited by dark-skinned non-Christians) in the distant past: the former in early 20th century Morocco; the latter in a remote region in colonial India in the late 19th century. (That particular area, Kafiristan, is located in today's Afghanistan.) The thematic similarities between the two films end there, »

- Andre Soares

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The 25 most underrated film scores of the 1990s

20 January 2016 5:22 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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The sensational, overlooked film scores from the years 1990 to 1999 that really are well worth digging out...

The movies went through tumultuous and exciting changes in the nineties. Quentin Tarantino exploded onto the scene with Reservoir Dogs, Generation X gave rise to slacker marvels like Clerks, and blockbusters like The Matrix put the awe back into special effects.

However, the 90s was also a sensational decade for film music, gifting us classics including the likes of Jurassic Park, Titanic, Total Recall, Braveheart and countless others. But the sheer quality of these soundtrack treasures shouldn’t overshadow those undervalued hidden gems that demonstrate the extraordinary range and versatility of our finest film composers, ones that may have passed you by. So here’s our selection of those incredible works: ranging from the earworming to the unsettling, the melodic to the chaotic, these are the scores that simply demand your attention. »

- simonbrew

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The Detective | Blu-ray Review

19 January 2016 7:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Director Gordon Douglas is one of many prolific filmmakers who seemed to fall short of auteur recognition despite considerable iconic items lodged within a vast filmography. Starting out in Hollywood as a child actor, he was directing shorts throughout the 1930s and began developing a resume of B-grade features, the most notable from this period being the 1954 sci-fi classic Them!, one of several genre items capitalizing on nuclear warfare fears. The 1960s found Douglas evolving freely with the times, churning out some racy Carroll Baker numbers (including in a biopic of Jean Harlow), the James Bond knock-off In Like Flint (1967), and a trio of Frank Sinatra vehicles. In between directing Sinatra in a pair of movies where the crooner plays Miami Pi Tony Rome, Douglas concocted something much more provocative, a seedy, lurid neo-noir titled The Detective (1968). One of several oft-referenced titles detailed in Vito Russo’s The Celluloid Closet, »

- Nicholas Bell

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6 items from 2016


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