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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1994

1-20 of 24 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


George A. Romero to Receive a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

17 hours ago | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

It was announced today that George A. Romero, the legendary filmmaker and godfather of the modern zombie, will receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame as part of a Class of 2017 that also includes Chris Pratt, Amy Adams, and Ryan Reynolds.

The date for Romero's star ceremony has not been revealed yet, but we'll keep Daily Dead readers updated on future announcements. In the meantime, we have the official press release with full details, as well as a video (via Variety) of the Class of 2017 announcements:

Press Release: Hollywood, CA. June 28, 2016 —A new group of entertainment professionals in Motion Pictures, Television, Live Theatre, Radio and Recording have been selected to receive stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, it was announced today,  Tuesday, June 28, 2016 by the Walk of Fame Selection Committee of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. These honorees were chosen from among hundreds of nominations to the »

- Derek Anderson

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Q&A: Composer Giona Ostinelli on Collaborating with Mickey Keating for Carnage Park, Darling & More

23 hours ago | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Hitting the big screen in New York City and VOD platforms on July 1st before making its Los Angeles theatrical debut on July 8th from IFC Midnight, Mickey Keating’s Carnage Park marks his fourth feature film collaboration with acclaimed composer Giona Ostinelli. For our latest Q&A feature, we caught up with Ostinelli to discuss working with Keating, using a wide range of instruments and items (including a nail gun) to create unease in Carnage Park, and much more.

Giona, thanks for taking the time to answer some questions for us. Your score for Carnage Park marks your fourth collaboration with director Mickey Keating. What first attracted you to Keating’s work?

Giona Ostinelli: Thanks so much for having me! Yes indeed, Mickey Keating and I have collaborated on four films. Our first film together, Ritual, was acquired by Lionsgate; our second film, Pod, was released theatrically with »

- Derek Anderson

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Alien: how its physical acting makes a horror classic

23 May 2016 3:05 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Even shorn of its sound, Alien remains a masterpiece of tension thanks to the power of its physical performances, Ryan writes...

This article contains spoilers for Alien.

When a film works - really, really works - its combination of acting, cinematography, music, sound design, lighting and editing come together so seamlessly that it can become difficult to pin down exactly why it’s so effective. Take Alien for example: beautifully shot by Ridley Scott and cinematographer Derek Vanlint, cut with razor-sharp perfection to Jerry Goldsmith’s piping eerie score, it’s a masterpiece of genre filmmaking.

In the years since Alien’s release in 1979, various aspects of it have been singled out for praise: Hr Giger was rightly handed an Oscar for his part in the seductively hideous xenomorph in its various stages. The film’s story and nightmare imagery is still picked over for its Freudian and feminist subtexts. »

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Garden of Evil

13 May 2016 8:10 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Bernard Herrmann music + weird landscapes = Nirvana. This big-star western tale has an unbreakable story but terrible dialogue and weak characters... yet for fans of adventure filmmaking it's a legend, thanks to a thunderous Bernard Herrmann music score that transforms dozens of uncanny, real Mexican locations into something other-worldly. Garden of Evil Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1954 / Color / 2:55 widescreen / 100 min. / Ship Date May 10, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Gary Cooper, Susan Hayward, Richard Widmark, Hugh Marlowe, Cameron Mitchell, Rita Moreno, Víctor Manuel Mendoza. Cinematography Milton R. Krasner, Jorge Stahl Jr. Art Direction Edward Fitzgerald, Lyle Wheeler Film Editor James B. Clark Original Music Bernard Herrmann Special Effects Ray Kellogg Written by Frank Fenton, Fred Freiberger, William Tunberg Produced by Charles Brackett Directed by Henry Hathaway

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

"The Garden of Evil. If the world was made of gold, I guess men would die for a handful of dirt. »

- Glenn Erickson

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Review – Brian Tyler live at the Royal Festival Hall

8 May 2016 5:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Sean Wilson reviews Iron Man 3 composer Brian Tyler’s sensational London concert…

What does it take to an endure as a successful film composer in the 21st century? The answer, if you’re Brian Tyler, is versatility – and a lot of energy. Making his concert debut at London’s Royal Festival Hall on Saturday night, the ubiquitous Tyler presented a rollicking line-up of his various scores for film, TV and console games, his muscular offerings proving that he really is this generation’s heir apparent to Jerry Goldsmith (that many of his scores exceed the quality of the projects for which they’re written is another facet he shares with Goldsmith.)

Loose and limber whilst addressing the might of the Philharmonia Orchestra, plus choir, Tyler’s dazzling conducting skills made for sheer spectacle all on their own, the composer using his entire body and vigorously gesticulating to all points »

- Sean Wilson

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‘The Omen’ Prequel Movie in the Works at Fox

28 April 2016 3:48 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Fox is developing “The First Omen,” a prequel to 1976’s horror-thriller “The Omen,” with Antonio Campos in talks to direct and David S. Goyer on board to produce.

Ben Jacoby has written the script for the prequel. Campos directed “Christine,” which premiered at Sundance and starred Rebecca Hall as Christine Chubbuck, the 29-year-old news reporter who committed suicide on live television in 1974.

Goyer, best known for his work on “The Dark Knight” trilogy, is producing with Kevin Turen through their Phantom Four banner.

The Omen” was directed by Richard Donner from a David Seltzer script. The film, starring Gregory Peck, Lee Remick and David Warner, revolved around a young child adopted at birth by an American Ambassador and his wife who are unaware that the child is the Antichrist.

The Omen” was a strong box office performer with over $60 million and won an Academy Award for best original score for Jerry Goldsmith. »

- Dave McNary

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Everything that’s wrong with the Batman v Superman soundtrack

4 April 2016 11:20 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Sean Wilson examines the Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice score – and why its relentlessly noisy nature is bad news for everyone…

Now, I want to preface this piece by saying that I am a massive fan of Hans Zimmer, truly one of the most innovative and compelling forces in film music (when he chooses to be). From his revolutionary synth breakout with the likes of Rain Man and Driving Miss Daisy in the 1980s to the thunderous action of Backdraft and his multi-faceted collaborations with Ridley Scott (Thelma and LouiseGladiator, Hannibal et al), Zimmer is a superb storyteller who doesn’t deserve the mud that is often slung at him. On tour in the UK at the moment, Zimmer has recently courted a lot of press attention with his high-profile announcement that he is to ‘retire’ from scoring superhero movies.

And this brings me to Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. »

- Sean Wilson

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25 great music scores composed for not very good movies

29 March 2016 3:26 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Some brilliant scores accompany movies that don't always deserve them. Here are 25 examples...

Can a film soundtrack rescue a movie that is otherwise a lost cause? One thing’s for sure: throughout the history of cinema, music has often been the redeeming feature of many an underwhelming movie. Here are 25 amazing film scores composed for films that, frankly, didn’t deserve them.

25) Meet Joe Black (Thomas Newman, 1998)

This somnambulistic three hour romantic drama should really feature an extra screen credit for star Brad Pitt’s fetishised blonde locks. Rising way above the torpid melodrama of the plot is one of Thomas Newman’s most hauntingly melodic and attractive scores, one that leaves his characteristic quirkiness at the door to paint a portrait of death that is both melancholy and hopeful. The spectacular 10-minute finale That Next Place remains one of Newman’s towering musical achievements.

24) Timeline (Brian Tyler, »

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Star Trek V: revisiting The Final Frontier

22 March 2016 5:16 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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The War On Terror meets The Final Frontier and asks the most important question of all time. What does God need with a starship?

Shatner fights God. That’s about all anyone remembers from the infamous Final Frontier. Over the years, the tale has grown in the telling. Some called it one of the worst films of all time, others call it a box office catastrophe. It killed the careers of the director, producer, the entire special effects company, and nearly ended the entire franchise right there and then. It is remembered merely as a vanity project gone horribly wrong.

But ask yourself this. What does God need with a starship? Can you answer it? Can you understand the question? To dismiss it out of hand is to dismiss the opportunity to think. Do not turn your brain off. 

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier is the ultimate question. »

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John Goodman, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Amy Schumer And J.J. Abrams On The Red Carpet For Dan Trachtenberg’s 10 Cloverfield Lane

9 March 2016 1:54 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Pictured: Dan Trachtenberg,John Goodman, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, John Gallagher Jr, J.J. Abrams. -Photo by: Dave Allocca/Starpix.

It’s time to discover the “Cloververse”. Check out the photos of the cast of 10 Cloverfield Lane as they walked the red carpet in New York along with director Dan Trachtenberg, producer J.J. Abrams and comedian Amy Schumer.

Pictured: John Goodman and Mary Elizabeth Winstead .-Photo by: Dave Allocca/Starpix.

Pictured: Mary Elizabeth Winstead.-Photo by: Dave Allocca/Starpix.

Pictured: J.J. Abrams .-Photo by: Dave Allocca/Starpix.

Pictured: Amy Schumer and J.J. Abrams.-Photo by: Dave Allocca/Starpix.

Pictured: Dan Trachtenberg, director.-Photo by: Dave Allocca/Starpix.

Hollywood first recognized Trachtenberg’s talents with his Black Box TV short “More Than You Can Chew.” But in 2011 his short film “Portal: No Escape” (based on the popular Valve video game) debuted on YouTube to over 1 million hits in 24 hours. At this time, the »

- Michelle McCue

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The Challenge | Blu-ray Review

8 March 2016 11:15 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

John Frankenheimer ended a three year hiatus following his 1979 environmental horror/creature feature Prophecy with a commendable martial-arts effort, The Challenge (1982). Starring Scott Glenn in his first lead performance, the curiosity was co-written by John Sayles and also stars Japanese legend Toshiro Mifune (who had previously appeared in Frankenheimer’s 1966 film, Grand Prix). Though it ultimately proves to be a nonsensical narrative in its clash of East meets West and traditional values threatened by the consumer cravings of the modernized world, some fantastic fight sequences (a pre-fame Steven Seagal served as technical advisor) and superb lensing from famed cinematographer Kozo Okazaki mark the title as worthy of recuperation for its conglomeration of vintage components.

In 1982 Los Angeles, a down and out boxer, Rick Murphy (Glenn) is approached to transport a sacred sword to Kyoto in order to restore it to its rightful owner, a master samurai, Toru Yoshida (Mifune). Apparently, »

- Nicholas Bell

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Damien episode 1 review: The Beast Rises

8 March 2016 1:49 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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The Omen TV sequel series feat. Merlin's Bradley James gets off to a terrible start. That doesn't mean Omen fans won't love it regardless...

This review contains spoilers.

1.1 The Beast Rises

Damien’s pilot episode is the hardest thing I’ve ever had to review. Usually an opinion should be clear by the end of an episode, aided by hurriedly scrawled notes taken during the viewing. And if I was going to base my review on those notes alone, then I would say that Damien is an awful television show. Objectively, that is the case. The dialogue is clunky and cliched, the characters are either bland or inconsistent and it’s shot in an alternately murky/shaky way that makes it a little unpleasant to watch. The actors do their best with weak material that gives no indication as to how this series will work going »

- louisamellor

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'Damien': TV Review

4 March 2016 3:25 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

At this point, film and TV viewers have stared down enough thwarted apocalypses that we've all become amateur scholars of eschatology when it comes to the number of the beast or Death's arrival astride a pale horse or the cavalcade of disease and pestilence that will herald the End of Days. While hardly a trailblazer in blending theological warnings with demonic thrillers, Richard Donner's The Omen rode a star-studded cast, an eerie demon child, a giddily graphic beheading and Jerry Goldsmith's "Ave Satani" to blockbuster status, three sequels and an unnecessary, nearly shot-by-shot 2006 remake. Premiering on

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- Daniel Fienberg

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The 25 most underrated film scores of the 2000s

3 March 2016 12:47 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Diverse, awe-inspiring and memorable treasures that have sadly fallen off the radar

The noughties were a tough decade for film music fans. Not only was there the unprecedented loss of four great masters in the form of Jerry Goldsmith, Elmer Bernstein, Michael Kamen and Basil Poledouris; the nature of the industry itself began to go through some seismic changes, not all of them for the better.

With the art of film scoring becoming ever more processed, driven increasingly by ghost writers, electronic augmentation and temp tracks, prospects looked bleak. However, this shouldn’t shield the fact that there were some blindingly brilliant scores composed during this period. Here’s but a small sampling of them.

25. The Departed (Howard Shore, 2006)

When it came to the sound of his Oscar-winning crime thriller, director Martin Scorsese hit on the inspired notion of having composer Howard Shore base it around a tango, »

- simonbrew

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TV Review: ‘Damien’

2 March 2016 7:15 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Television antiheroes don’t get much more arch than the Antichrist. Yet “Damien,” A&E’s new drama, chooses a somewhat unorthodox point of entry into that story, one that hews closely to the original 1976 movie about a demon-seed child (wisely ignoring most of what’s transpired in between), and draws liberally from it, even incorporating clips of Gregory Peck and Lee Remick as flashbacks. At the same time, as constructed, the title character and prophesied bringer-of-end-times becomes a rather bland vessel, in a series best consumed without giving it too much thought — a popcorn-style, horror-steeped prelude to the apocalypse.

Developed by Glen Mazzara (whose credits include running “The Walking Dead”) and Ross Fineman, this latest take on the sequel-ized and remade horror staple introduces Damien (Bradley James) as an adult, working as a war photographer with scant memory of his past. Operating abroad, an unsettling incident happens before he »

- Brian Lowry

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Review: "The 88Th Annual Academy Awards"

29 February 2016 8:40 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

Remember the old days when unpredictable occurrences seemed to predictably occur at the Oscars ceremony? There was the nude streaker who failed to unravel the ever-unflappable David Niven. There were the political activist winners who used the forum to grandstand for their favorite causes. This included Vanessa Redgrave's pro-Palestinian, anti-Zionist remarks during her acceptance speech, Marlon Brando sending a surrogate to reject his "Godfather" Oscar in protest of Hollywood's treatment of Native Americans, "Patton" winner George C. Scott refusing to show up at all in protest of the competitive nature of awards shows, the producers of the anti-Vietnam War documentary "Hearts and Minds" taking solace that that the nation was about to be "liberated" by a brutal communist regime, which caused another stir when Frank Sinatra was pushed on stage at Bob Hope's urging to read a hastily-scribbled denouncement of the remark. The Oscars haven't »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Glen Mazzara Talks Damien, The Walking Dead, Overlook Hotel

26 February 2016 6:26 PM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

The Antichrist is coming to A&E on March 7th with the premiere of Damien, a sequel series to 1976’s The Omen. Ahead of the show’s debut, Daily Dead recently took part in a conference call with Damien executive producer and showrunner Glen Mazzara. In addition to discussing his new series, Mazzara also recalled one of his favorite memories from working on The Walking Dead and talked briefly about studying Stanley Kubrick’s style while writing Overlook Hotel, a prequel to The Shining.

On re-teaming with Scott Wilson, who played Hershel Greene on The Walking Dead:

Glen Mazzara: Scott and I loved working together on The Walking Dead. I just think he’s such a huge talent. One of the best nights of my career was talking to him late one night while we were filming the barn burning scene and we had Norman [Reedus] riding around on a motorcycle shooting zombies, »

- Derek Anderson

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What debt does Alien owe David Cronenberg’s Shivers?

18 February 2016 6:15 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Alien may be a sci-fi horror classic, but what about the movies that inspired it - including David Cronenberg’s debut, Shivers?

At first, they might look as different as night and day. One is the directorial debut from a maverick Canadian director, the other is a Hollywood movie funded by 20th Century Fox. One is set in deep space, the other in a luxury apartment block on terra firma. One had a decent amount of money to throw at the construction of sets and special effects, the other was made for a few thousand dollars.

Yet Alien, released in 1979 and triggering a franchise that is still growing and mutating today, has more in common with Shivers than at first meets the eye. Cronenberg made Shivers for approximately $130,000 in 1975. Could it be that this low-budget shocker inspired what is still considered to be the ultimate space horror movie? »

- ryanlambie

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19 unforgettable soundtrack moments from The X-Files

9 February 2016 11:00 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Sean Wilson looks back at composer Mark Snow’s extraordinary contribution to one of the greatest TV shows of all time…

It was the pop culture sensation of the 1990s – and now it’s back to storm TV screens in the UK (well, Channel 5 anyway). The X-Files initially ran for 10 series’ (in addition to spawning two movies) and introduced us to two of television’s greatest heroes in the form of FBI agents Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson), both dedicated to exposing extraterrestrial and paranormal phenomena lurking amidst the fabric of everyday life.

However, the series wouldn’t have had half its impact without the input of composer Mark Snow, whose haunting music constantly had viewers anticipating what was around the next corner. Here are 19 memorable tracks exploring the rich yet underrated soundtrack history of this landmark show, ones confirming Snow as perhaps the unsung hero of The X-Files. »

- Sean Wilson

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The Only Thing More Beautiful Than the Music of 'Star Trek' Is William Shatner Talking About It (Maybe)

9 February 2016 6:40 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Okay, serious question: Should we call William Shatner a legend? An icon? Or just think of him as an actor, writer, director and producer whose connection to the "Star Trek" franchise will make sure that he's remembered for generations yet to come? Read More: The 13 TV Series Revivals We Least Expected to See Reborn That wasn't something Indiewire got a chance to ask Shatner about when we got him on the phone recently, because what Shatner wanted to talk about was the upcoming "Star Trek - The Ultimate Voyage 50th Anniversary Concert Tour," which brings the music composed by Gerald Fried, Jay Chattaway, Dennis McCarthy, Mark McKenzie, Cliff Eidelman, Ron Jones and Jerry Goldsmith to the United States and Canada as a live theatrical, orchestral experience.  Below, Shatner explains what an actor's relationship to the soundtrack is like, how that changes when you're also directing the project and what makes »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1994

1-20 of 24 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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