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1-20 of 21 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Today's 5: Hulk out with Joan Crawford, ol' sport!

10 May 2017 6:24 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Good morning film fans. Make today a good one. We'll help with suggestions as to mental memes and mood boosters for the day.

Five showbiz anniversaries of note today (May 10th) and how to honor each of them 

2013 The Great Gatsby opens in movie theaters. It's yet another hit for Baz Luhrmann and yet another Oscar-winning moment for his wife/collaborator Catherine Martin. It's also, to date, your only chance to see Leonardo DiCaprio in a pink suit.

In its honor today: Listen to that great soundtrack and annoy your friends by calling them "ol' sport" all day!

1977 Joan Crawford dies (as just dramatized on Feud's finale). But like all of the great film stars, she's immortal...

with Clark Gable in Chained (1934)

People have been trying to reduce her or count her out since she first became famous but she held on for decades with an iron grip »

- NATHANIEL R

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Hedy Lamarr’s Double Life: Glamorous Actress Was Secretly an Inventor Helping the Military — Before Her Tragic Final Years

28 April 2017 1:48 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Hedy Lamarr lived the glamorous life of a Golden Age Hollywood actress, starring alongside legends like Clark Gable and Judy Garland in over 18 films during the 1940s. But the Austrian star — widely hailed during her time as the most beautiful woman alive — also had a secret second life: She was a successful wartime inventor.

Lamarr’s intriguing life — and her tragic end as a recluse — is the subject of the new documentary Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story. Co-executive-produced by Susan Sarandon and directed by Alexandra Dean, the documentary takes a deep dive into the unknown story behind one of Hollywood’s most alluring stars. »

- Ale Russian

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Tribeca 2017 Women Directors: Meet Alexandra Dean — “Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story”

22 April 2017 11:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Hedy Lamarr in “Ziegfeld Girl”: The Everett Collection

Alexandra Dean is an Emmy Award-winning journalist and producer. She produced news-magazine documentaries for PBS before becoming a series and documentary producer at Bloomberg television, producing the series “Innovators, Adventures and Pursuits.” She also writes about invention for Businessweek magazine. She is a founding partner at Reframed Pictures.

Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story” will premiere at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival on April 23.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words

Ad: “Bombshell” is a film about a girl who wanted to make her mark in the world, but the world could not see past her face. Hedy Lamarr was considered “the most beautiful girl in the world” in the 1940s. She was a screen legend who starred alongside Jimmy Stewart and Clark Gable, but she also had a secret hobby. At night, she invented.

She worked on ideas with Howard Hughes, but her most exciting invention was a “secret communication system” she invented for Allied warships to torpedo Nazi submarines with deadly accuracy. That communication system became the basis for our secure Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Gps, and even some cell phone technology today.

But Hedy was never recognized for this extraordinary invention because she never told the press what she had done. In fact, in her later years she became a recluse and died alone and penniless. Then, in 2016 we found lost tapes of Hedy talking to a reporter in 1990. Now, for the first time, Hedy explains what happened in her own words.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Ad: Who wouldn’t want to make a story about Hedy?! She was a wild child. Some said she was a spy. She was a movie star and later a drug addict and a recluse. Her life was crazy enough before we discovered she came up with a technology we use in our digital devices every day.

I spent years profiling inventors and innovators for Bloomberg Television and Businessweek, but I never heard a life story that came close to Hedy’s. I suppose it also particularly resonated for me because as a short, quiet woman who always wanted to be a director, I know a little about what it’s like to want to do something that no one expects you to do.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they’re leaving the theater?

Ad: I’d like them to wonder how many people who look wrong for the part actually have the capacity to do extraordinary things they dream of achieving. I think every single one of us has some extraordinary spark. We just need Hedy’s balls of steel to make our dreams happen!

W&H: What was your biggest challenge making this film?

Ad: Definitely the biggest challenge was finding Hedy’s voice. At first we thought we would have to get an actress to read her autobiography, but then I discovered that Hedy sued the ghostwriter for libel, claiming nothing in the autobiography was true! I started desperately looking for other primary sources, but Hedy gave only a handful of short print interviews about her invention and never spoke about it on radio or television.

I was sitting up in bed at night staring at the walls and thinking there must be some tape of her telling her life story. My team and I started calling every person who ever said on the record they talked to Hedy Lamarr and after several months of searching we finally found a reporter who had recorded her 25 years ago and never published the tapes. The day we found the tapes we ripped up our film and started again, letting Hedy dictate the way we told her story.

W&H: How did you get your film funded?

Ad: It was a mix of funds from foundations, individual donors, and investors, as well as funding from “American Masters” on PBS, the program that will air “Bombshell” next fall.

The majority of our funds we raised from the Alfred P. Sloan foundation, which has been an extraordinary supporter of Hedy and her story for many years.

W&H: What does it mean to have your film play at Tribeca?

Ad: It’s an absolute dream come true. Truly. It’s blowing my mind!

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Ad: The best and worst advice that I get as a filmmaker tends to be all wrapped up in one piece of mixed advice. People tend to tell you what you should fix about your film by explaining how they would change it. What you need to listen to is that something is “bumping” them and may need improvement. You don’t need to listen to their particular diagnosis of how to improve the film. That distinction is so crucial.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female filmmakers?

Ad: Watch out for opinionated people. They may think you need more guidance than you do. Try hard to find your own voice. It’s in there, and all of us have one.

It feels like many young boys are encouraged to speak strongly in their individual voices from birth, and I’m not sure it’s the same for girls. We sometimes have to spend time finding that voice. It’s the one that whispers to you when people try to change your work. Listen to it — it’s trying to tell you something!

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why

Ad: My favorite has to be “The Hurt Locker.” Kathryn Bigelow is a legend. I thought she told that story with exquisite timing and suspense as well as a wonderful sense of perspective about the dullness of civilian life after the macabre thrill of wartime.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Ad: God, I hope [the numbers improve, but] I have no idea [how optimistic to be]. It seems inevitable that more women will direct because more and more viewers are demanding content that comes from multiple perspectives.

What’s tricky is securing the funding for directors who are female or from minority backgrounds. We just have to wait for more people to have faith in us.

Tribeca 2017 Women Directors: Meet Alexandra Dean — “Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Trailer Watch: Laurie Simmons Revisits Hollywood’s Past in “My Art”

20 April 2017 2:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

My Art

A trailer has landed for “My Art,” Laurie Simmons’ feature directorial debut. The spot for the drama kicks off with a scene all-too-familiar to those who have chosen to pursue a career in the arts. Ellie Shine (Simmons), a struggling artist, is shown catching up with another artist significantly younger and more accomplished than she. Meryl, played by Simmons’ daughter, Lena Dunham, says, “I have to be in Europe between my two installations. Then I’ve got the fall show at my New York gallery. I wouldn’t schedule a fall show again. I think it’s brutal.” “Oh, that sounds brutal,” Ellie unconvincingly agrees, clearly envious of the opportunities Meryl is getting.

And Ellie doesn’t just have to hear about Meryl’s successes — she has to tell the wunderkind what she’s up to. While Meryl travels around the world showing her art, Ellie will be housesitting. She’s been offered the summer home of a famous friend and “seizes the opportunity to hit the reset button on her life and work,” the film’s official synopsis details. “She unwittingly finds inspiration in two out-of-work actors who maintain the gardens at her summer retreat: Frank (Robert Clohessy), a recent widower trying to reassemble his life, and Tom (Josh Safdie), a hungry young actor whose wife (Parker Posey) has a less ambitious vision for their idyllic country life. Joining them is John (John Rothman), a divorced lawyer looking for a summer distraction. This unlikely trio accompanies Ellie on an odd and delightful journey toward finding her late-blooming artistic momentum.”

The trailer shows Ellie pursuing a new project. She and her pals re-create iconic film scenes. “You can never be Clark Gable,” Ellie tells Frank. “I can never be Marilyn Monroe. I just want to see what it looks like.”

My Art” premiered at the 2016 Venice Film Festival and will make its North American debut at the Tribeca Film Festival April 22.

“I’d imagined the character of Ellie for a long time and at a certain point I would say she started telling me her story,” Simmons told us in a soon-to-be published interview. She explained, “I’ve spent a lot of time observing both portrayals of artists and representations of women my age on-screen and feel that both often fall short of what I feel to be accurate and true to the life I’ve experienced.”

Simmons previously helmed the 2006 short “The Music of Regret,” a musical starring Meryl Streep. Her career as a photographer and artist spans over 40 years.

No word on when “My Art” will hit theaters or VOD. Check out the trailer below.

https://medium.com/media/80e3e7267905659f5efba2c85ff27546/href

Trailer Watch: Laurie Simmons Revisits Hollywood’s Past in “My Art” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Entertainment News: ‘Mr. Warmth’ Don Rickles Dies at 90

7 April 2017 7:24 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Los Angeles – With the flourish of trumpets in “The Bullfighter’s Song,” a pugnacious man would strut on stage and launch a volley of hilarious insults on some unsuspecting targets. That act was Don Rickles, whose show business nicknames included “The King of Zing,” “The Merchant of Venom” and the magnificently ironic “Mr. Warmth.” Rickles died in Los Angeles on April 6th, 2017. He was 90.

In his early career, Rickles was a throwback to the cocktail and burlesque joints of the 1950s and ‘60s, where a burgeoning stand up comic would do anything to engage the audience and keep a gig. With a quick wit and rat-a-tat delivery, Rickles developed a persona that would keep him working virtually all the way to the end. He went from the “Rat Pack” era, through comedy roasts of the 1970s, to the voice of Mr. Potato Head in the “Toy Story” series, and never »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Insult comic Don Rickles dies aged 90

6 April 2017 8:11 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Martin Scorsese pays tribute: “It was like listening to a great jazz musician wail.”

Don Rickles, legendary comedian and actor, died on Thursday in Los Angeles of kidney failure. He was 90.

Born in New York City, Rickles began his career in nightclubs where he earned his reputation as an insult comic after his manner of responding to hecklers became as popular as the material itself. 

Rickles’ career spanned more than six decades and included continued stand-up routines, acting in television and film, as well as regular appearances on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and Late Show with David Letterman.

The comedian may be best known to contemporary audiences as the voice of Mr. Potato Head in Pixar’s Toy Story films, including the latest instalment, Toy Story 4, due to hit theatres in 2019. 

He got his break in the 1958 war film Run Silent Run Deep alongside Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster, followed by dramatic »

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Taylor Swift’s Beverly Hills Mansion Is Officially a Historic City Landmark

6 April 2017 6:59 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

This article originally appeared on Travel + Leisure.

Taylor Swift is officially historic. Well, at least her Beverly Hills mansion is.

On Tuesday evening, the five-member Beverly Hills City Council approved Swift’s request to designate her home in Los Angeles as a historic city landmark. It was a swift and unanimous vote.

Swift bought the 11,000-square-foot, four-bedroom estate from the heirs of Hollywood producer Samuel Goldwyn — co-founder of Goldwyn Pictures, which later became MGM — in 2015 for $25 million, according to property records. The house, originally built in 1934, sits just behind the Beverly Hills Hotel.

“I think this is a true community »

- People Staff

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Don Rickles, 'insult comic', dies aged 90

6 April 2017 4:11 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Legendary comedian had roles in Toy Story and Casino.

Don Rickles, legendary comedian and actor, died on Thursday in Los Angeles of kidney failure. He was 90.

Born in New York City, Rickles began his career in nightclubs where he earned his reputation as an insult comic after his manner of responding to hecklers became as popular as the material itself. 

Rickles’ career spanned more than six decades and included continued stand-up routines, acting in television and film, as well as regular appearances on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and Late Show with David Letterman.

The comedian may be best known to contemporary audiences as the voice of Mr. Potato Head in Pixar’s Toy Story films, including the latest instalment, Toy Story 4, due to hit theatres in 2019. 

He got his break in the 1958 war film Run Silent Run Deep alongside Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster, followed by dramatic turns in The Rabbit Trap and X: The Man With The X-Ray Eyes »

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Don Rickles Remembered as Hollywood Mourns the Loss of a Comedy Genius

6 April 2017 3:53 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Earlier today, we reportedly the sad news that Hollywood has lost another legend, with comedian Don Rickles passing away at the age of 90. His publicist confirmed that the iconic insult comic passed in his Los Angeles home, from kidney failure. As word of his passing spread, Hollywood icons left and right paid tribute to the late comedian through social media, to honor this late legend.

While most sent out their tributes through Twitter, others released lengthier tributes elsewhere. Rolling Stone caught up with Gilbert Gottfried, who summed up the the late comedian's legacy with a heartfelt statement that explained why Rickles will go down in history as one of the best comedians ever. Here's what Gilbert Gottfried had to say.

"Don Rickles was never politically correct, and he would never apologize for any of it. He was totally unapologetic about his comedy. So I admired that and looked at him »

- MovieWeb

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Don Rickles, Legendary Comedian, Passes Away at 90

6 April 2017 12:46 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The Hollywood community is in morning once again, with another iconic performer passing away. Don Rickles, the legendary insult comedian and actor, died at the age of 90, in his Los Angeles home. The actor/comedian's publicist, Paul Shefrin, confirmed that his client had succumbed to kidney failure earlier today.

The Hollywood Reporter reveals that the funeral services will be private, and that donations can be made in the late comedian's name to his son's organization, the Larry Rickles Endowment Fund at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. Don Rickles was born May 8, 1926 in New York City, raised in the Jackson Heights neighborhood of Queens. He graduated from Newtown High School and served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, after which, he returned home and graduated from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts.

Don Rickles got his start in the entertainment business by performing as a stand-up comedian for several years. »

- MovieWeb

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Legendary Comedian Don Rickles Dies at 90

6 April 2017 11:12 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Legendary comedian Don Rickles passed away at home from kidney failure, his publicist confirmed. He was 90.  Rickles, who would've turned 91 on May 8, was best known for his comedy, but also became a best-selling author and dramatic actor. He made his mark alongside Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster in Run Silent, Run Deep. Rickles also served as an honorary member of the Rat Pack and appeared as an abrasive celebrity roast comic. Throughout his career, Rickles also appeared on various sitcoms and dramatic series, including Get Smart and Run for Your Life. Perhaps one of his best known film roles was voicing the role of Mr. Potato Head in Pixar's Toy Story »

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Surprise! Doris Day Celebrates Her 95th (not 93rd) Birthday — See the Exclusive Portrait

2 April 2017 4:03 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Hollywood legend Doris Day‘s actual birthday may be Monday, but that doesn’t mean she can’t get the party started a little early.

The Pajama Game star and animal rights activist released a special birthday portrait exclusively to People ahead of her 95th birthday on Monday. (Yes, that’s right, Day will actually turn 95 — not 93 as it was previously believed — but who can blame a Hollywood legend for shaving a few years off?) The actress is planning on spending her actual birthday with a low-key affair at her home in Carmel, California.

“The #DorisBirthdayWish video and photo campaign »

- Liz McNeil and Mike Miller

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Let Us Now Praise The Mad Genius Of Richard Harland Smith

2 April 2017 3:09 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

A few years ago, in commemoration of the 10th anniversary of the death of influential film critic Pauline Kael, I wrote the following:

“I think (Kael) did a lot to expose the truth… that directors, writers and actors who often work awfully close to the surface may still have subterranean levels of achievement or purpose or commentary that they themselves may be least qualified to articulate. It’s what’s behind her disdain for Antonioni’s pontificating at the Cannes film festival; it’s what behind the high percentage of uselessness of proliferating DVD commentaries in which we get to hear every dull anecdote, redundant explication of plot development and any other inanity that strikes the director of the latest Jennifer Aniston rom-com to blurt out breathlessly; and it is what’s behind a director like Eli Roth, who tailors the subtext of something like Hostel Part II almost as »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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How Doris Day Plans to Celebrate Her 93rd Birthday (Hint: Keep an Eye Out for Her Home Balcony)

24 March 2017 12:58 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

She was one of Hollywood’s biggest stars and remains one of the most beloved, but for her upcoming 93rd birthday on April 3, Doris Day will spend the day quietly at her home in Carmel, California, surrounded by close friends and her beloved dogs.

“Doris has never been one for celebrating her own birthday,” her publicist Charley Cullen Walters tells People, “but she’s very excited to visit with friends and family throughout the day, certainly to spend time with her beloved animals, and now to see photos from all over the world via the #DorisBirthdayWish campaign, through which we »

- Liz McNeil

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The Most Visible Star: Marilyn Monroe’s Acting Talent

15 March 2017 7:52 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The actress is mostly remembered for her good looks, but what about her impressive performances?

In Richard Dyer’s book Heavenly Bodies: Film Stars and Society, he writes that Marilyn Monroe was “the most visible star”: an actress whose life was put on display, and remains so over 50 years after her death. She is one of the most iconic Hollywood stars of all time, her face instantly recognizable to even those who have never seen any of her movies. She is a symbol of beauty, glamor, cinema, femininity, blondness, sexuality, and tragedy. While the world speculates about her personal life — who was she romantically involved with? How did she die? What was she really like? — her career as an actress is overshadowed by her fame.

While she may not have been the greatest actress of all time, she certainly had her fair share of talent and intelligence, and always worked incredibly hard to bring her »

- Angela Morrison

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Watch Jeff Bridges Revive ‘Big Lebowski’ Character ‘The Dude’ at John Goodman’s Walk of Fame Ceremony

10 March 2017 2:45 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Jeffrey “The Dude” Lebowski was brought back to life on Hollywood Boulevard, but this time, he was the one who delivered a eulogy for a friend, and it ended with “Good afternoon, sweet prince,” rather than good night.

At John Goodman’s Walk of Fame ceremony, Jeff Bridges donned “The Dude’s” signature, quirky, knit sweater, and delivered a typically rambling and hilarious rendition of the eulogy that Walter gives before scattering Donny’s ashes in the 1998 Coen Brothers cult classic “The Big Lebowski.”

Related

Roseanne’ Reunion: John Goodman and Sara Gilbert Play Dan and Darlene for First Time in 20 Years

Bridges asked Goodman to hold his suit and bag for him, and as he drew out “The Dude’s” poncho-like garment, a loud cheer erupted from the crowd when they realized one of cinema’s most iconic slackers was about to be reincarnated in front of them.

“He’s a good actor, »

- Will Thorne

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‘Moonlight’ is the Most Frugal Best Picture Ever: See Analysis of the 10 Lowest-Budget Winners of all Time

1 March 2017 8:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

With a budget of $1.5 million, 2017 Best Picture winner “Moonlight” cost less than a 30-second ad during the Oscars (reported price: $2.2 million). And, among the category’s 89 winners, it stands as the lowest-budgeted film in the Academy Awards’ history.

To determine the 10 least expensive Best Picture winners, we looked back at each year, researched reported budgets, and then calculated them at 2017 dollar values. Although independent films have dominated the Oscars for the last decade, the only indie to make the cut from that period was “Crash.” Nor did Woody Allen’s “Annie Hall,” or some black-and-white studio classics like “Casablanca” or “The Lost Weekend.”

The 10 straddle almost every decade of the Oscars and come from either independent producers or smaller distributors (four of the 10 were released by United Artists).

For comparison, the most expensive film to win remains “Titanic;” its adjusted budget was $300 million more than “Moonlight.” That total dwarfs the »

- Tom Brueggemann

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‘Separate Tables’ Screenwriter John Gay Dies at 92

23 February 2017 12:20 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

John Gay, known for writing movies including “Run Silent Run Deep,” “Separate Tables,” “The Hallelujah Trail” and “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father,” died on Feb. 4 in Santa Monica. He was 92.

Gay shared an Oscar writing nom with Terrence Rattigan for the screenplay for “Separate Tables,” a 1958 romantic drama starring Burt Lancaster, Rita Hayworth, Deborah Kerr, and David Niven.

Long active in the Writers Guild of America, Gay wrote 14 feature films and 39 miniseries and TV movies, scripting projects for John Huston, Vincent Minnelli and John Sturges. He helped lead the Writers Guild through difficult negotiations while serving on the Wgaw’s Board of Directors (1971-75, 1977-79), and as Vice President (1985-87).

Gay started out in live television starring with his wife Barbara in “Mr. and Mrs. Mystery,” and went on to write for numerous live TV dramas. Lancaster helped recruit him to Hollywood, where he wrote Clark Gable-Lancaster starring submarine film “Run Silent Run Deep.” He »

- Pat Saperstein

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‘Separate Tables’ Screenwriter John Gay Dies at 92

23 February 2017 12:20 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

John Gay, known for writing movies including “Run Silent Run Deep,” “Separate Tables,” “The Hallelujah Trail” and “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father,” died on Feb. 4 in Santa Monica. He was 92.

Gay shared an Oscar writing nom with Terrence Rattigan for the screenplay for “Separate Tables,” a 1958 romantic drama starring Burt Lancaster, Rita Hayworth, Deborah Kerr, and David Niven.

Long active in the Writers Guild of America, Gay wrote 14 feature films and 39 miniseries and TV movies, scripting projects for John Huston, Vincent Minnelli and John Sturges. He helped lead the Writers Guild through difficult negotiations while serving on the Wgaw’s Board of Directors (1971-75, 1977-79), and as Vice President (1985-87).

Gay started out in live television starring with his wife Barbara in “Mr. and Mrs. Mystery,” and went on to write for numerous live TV dramas. Lancaster helped recruit him to Hollywood, where he wrote Clark Gable-Lancaster »

- Pat Saperstein

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Here’s Why an Oscar Is Only Worth $10

22 February 2017 6:38 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

A version of this article originally appeared on ew.com.

Despite the glitz, glamor, and prestige of the Academy Awards, the Oscar statue itself isn’t worth much of anything, monetarily speaking.

In a new video from Coinage, Time Inc.’s personal finance video company, it’s revealed that an actual Oscar is only valued at $10. The making of the statue costs $400, but before a trophy can be put up for bid, it must first be offered to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for just $10 — an Academy rule that was upheld in a 2015 court ruling.

Among the »

- Derek Lawrence

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