Joan Fontaine (I) - News Poster

News

2018 Oscars: All 5 Best Actress nominees in Best Picture contenders for first time in 40 years?

2018 Oscars:  All 5 Best Actress nominees in Best Picture contenders for first time in 40 years?
Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Saoirse Ronan (“Lady Bird”), Sally Hawkins (“The Shape of Water”), Meryl Streep (“The Post”) and Margot Robbie (“I, Tonya”) have long been our predicted Best Actress Oscar nominees. If they all make the cut, along with their films in Best Picture, they’d join a very exclusive club: It’d be first Best Actress slate in 40 years and just the fifth overall where everyone is in a film nominated for Best Picture.

The only other times this has occurred were for the film years 1934, 1939, 1940 and 1977 — but many of them come with caveats. In 1934, there were still only three acting nominees — winner Claudette Colbert (“It Happened One Night”), Grace Moore (“One Night of Love”) and Norma Shearer (“The Barretts of Wimpole Street”) — and 12 Best Picture nominees, before the academy standardized the categories to five each. This was also the infamous year of the write-in
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars flashback: Iraq invasion in 2003 almost cancelled 75th anniversary Oscars family album reunion of 59 acting winners [Watch]

The 75th anniversary ceremony for the Academy Awards almost didn’t happen as scheduled. When America led an invasion of Iraq that weekend, broadcast network ABC pleaded with producer Gil Cates and Academy president Frank Piersen to move the event back a week. The duo claimed it would be too expensive to make the switch and that the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood would be unavailable.

On March 23, 2003, the ceremony went live on ABC as scheduled, hosted by comedian, actor, and writer Steve Martin, with the Best Picture proclaimed to be “Chicago.” However, several presenters such as Cate Blanchett, Jim Carrey, and Will Smith cancelled their appearances. That day’s events also caused several past winners to bail out on appearing in the Oscars family album slated for late in the show. Similar to a segment five years early for the 70th anniversary show (read more on the link above), the
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Phantom Thread’: How Paul Thomas Anderson’s Costume Designer Channeled Reynolds Woodcock

  • Indiewire
‘Phantom Thread’: How Paul Thomas Anderson’s Costume Designer Channeled Reynolds Woodcock
For costume designer Mark Bridges, it’s always an adventure working with Paul Thomas Anderson. But “Phantom Thread,” their eighth collaboration, represented a meta challenge: It was a movie about his craft.

But Bridges admits that there’s a big difference between fashion and costume design. “I’m there to facilitate an actor’s performance and fulfill the vision of a director,” he said.

And in the case of “Phantom Thread,” about the world of London haute couture in the 1950s, it’s a movie about the fashion designer as auteur. It stars Daniel Day-Lewis as the eccentric and obsessive Reynolds Woodcock, whose world is turned upside down when he falls for Eastern European waitress Alma (Vicky Krieps). But imagine if “Rebecca’s” Joan Fontaine struck back at Laurence Olivier with sly subversion, exorcising his demons while bringing them closer together. That’s what Anderson did with his twisted and witty love story.
See full article at Indiewire »

Paul Thomas Anderson: Why I Needed to Make 'Phantom Thread'

Paul Thomas Anderson: Why I Needed to Make 'Phantom Thread'
You started hearing rumors and half-whispered, cryptic comments last year: Paul Thomas Anderson is working on a new film; it has something to do with the London fashion world in the 1950s, maybe; it will reunite him with his There Will Be Blood star Daniel Day-Lewis, potentially; it's loosely based off the life of either Charles James or Cristobal Balenciaga, possibly; the actor could be studying how to be a real-life tailor for the part, we think. Even the name was a bit of a question mark – it might be called Phantom Thread?
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Letter from an Unknown Woman

This devastating romantic melodrama is Max Ophüls’ best American picture — perhaps because it seems so European? It’s probably Joan Fontaine’s finest hour as well, and Louis Jourdan comes across as a great actor in a part perfect for his screen personality. The theme could be called, ‘No regrets,’ but also, ‘Everything is to be regretted.’

Letter from an Unknown Woman

Blu-ray

Olive Signature

1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 87 min. / Street Date December 5, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Joan Fontaine, Louis Jourdan, Mady Christians, Marcel Journet, Art Smith, Carol Yorke, Howard Freeman, John Good, Leo B. Pessin, Erskine Sanford, Otto Waldis, Sonja Bryden.

Cinematography: Franz Planer

Film Editor: Ted J. Kent

Original Music: Daniele Amfitheatrof

Written by Howard Koch from a story by Stefan Zweig

Produced by John Houseman

Directed by Max Ophüls

A young woman’s romantic nature goes beyond all limits, probing the nature of True Love.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Tallinn Film Review: ‘Asphyxia’

Tallinn Film Review: ‘Asphyxia’
On the international stage and on the festival circuit, Iranian cinema is not immediately associated with genre. The impish, richly ambiguous films of Abbas Kiarostami and the humanist social dramas of Asghar Farhadi have loomed largest in terms of defining the national canon. But while Fereydoun Jeyrani’s “Asphyxia” — a contemporary Iranian take on classic film noir and Gothic horror — doesn’t seem like an obvious hybrid at first, it ultimately makes a compelling case for itself: As the movie progresses, it becomes thrillingly clear that the cruel gender politics of those sinister genres can map themselves in mutually illuminating ways onto an inquisitive critique of female oppression in contemporary Iran.

Still, “Asphyxia” is, first and foremost, an accessible, entertainingly blackhearted, unapologetically Hitchcockian thriller, with a social subtext lurking for those who look. It also manages the tricky business of plausibly updating its throwback genres while keeping the aesthetic — here shot in whispery, shadowy black-and-white
See full article at Variety - Film News »

First ‘Phantom Thread’ Screening: Paul Thomas Anderson Had More Fittings Than Shooting Days, Lesley Manville Says

First ‘Phantom Thread’ Screening: Paul Thomas Anderson Had More Fittings Than Shooting Days, Lesley Manville Says
The new Paul Thomas Anderson movie “Phantom Thread” is under review embargo, of course, but Focus Features started screening the late arrival for various guild and Academy voters and press, who at the first screening Friday gave a hearty round of applause to the ‘50s London romance set in the high-couture fashion world.

Read More:Daniel Day-Lewis Struggled With Draping On the Set of Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Phantom Thread

PTA wrote the script for Daniel Day-Lewis, hoping it would pass muster with the finicky actor who agreed to star as fussy women’s designer Reynolds Woodcock, which could be the retiring actor’s last role. Anderson relied on Day-Lewis more than he did in “There Will Be Blood” (which won Ddl his second of three Oscars), because “I don’t speak English, I speak American,” Anderson said at the post-screening Q&A at the Fine Arts Theatre in Los Angeles.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

First ‘Phantom Thread’ Screening: Paul Thomas Anderson Had More Fittings Than Shooting Days, Lesley Manville Says

  • Indiewire
First ‘Phantom Thread’ Screening: Paul Thomas Anderson Had More Fittings Than Shooting Days, Lesley Manville Says
The new Paul Thomas Anderson movie “Phantom Thread” is under review embargo, of course, but Focus Features started screening the late arrival for various guild and Academy voters and press, who at the first screening Friday gave a hearty round of applause to the ‘50s London romance set in the high-couture fashion world.

Read More:Daniel Day-Lewis Struggled With Draping On the Set of Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Phantom Thread

PTA wrote the script for Daniel Day-Lewis, hoping it would pass muster with the finicky actor who agreed to star as fussy women’s designer Reynolds Woodcock, which could be the retiring actor’s last role. Anderson relied on Day-Lewis more than he did in “There Will Be Blood” (which won Ddl his second of three Oscars), because “I don’t speak English, I speak American,” Anderson said at the post-screening Q&A at the Fine Arts Theatre in Los Angeles.
See full article at Indiewire »

I’ll Be Seeing You

This unusually sensitive, overlooked WW2 romance skips the morale-boosting baloney of the day. Two people meet on a train, each with a personal shame they dare not speak of. Ginger Rogers and Joseph Cotten are excellent under William Dieterle’s direction, and Shirley Temple doesn’t do half the damage you’d think she might.

I’ll Be Seeing You

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1944 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 85 min. / Street Date November 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Ginger Rogers, Joseph Cotten, Shirley Temple, Spring Byington, John Derek, Tom Tully, Chill Wills, Kenny Bowers.

Cinematography: Tony Gaudio

Film Editor: William H. Zeigler

Special Effects: Jack Cosgrove

Original Music: Daniele Amfitheatrof

Stunt Double: Cliff Lyons

Written by Marion Parsonette from a play by Charles Martin

Produced by Dore Schary

Directed by William Dieterle

Aha! A little research explains why several late-’40s melodramas from David O. Selznick come off as smart productions,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

September/October. It's a Wrap

Since the bulk of September and October are given over to festival life each year (here's all that business wrapped up for you) there's less time for randomness which is in some ways our favorite thing about blogging about the cinema. But since we haven't done an Icymi best of since August, here are 16 things you might have missed that you should check out:

This is Halloween Salim's cinematic evocation of the season The Furniture: The Beguiled Daniel gazes into the plaster haze Elizabeth Debicki as Virginia Woolf Murtada takes a first look Martyr Mothers of Aronofsky Jorge wonders if the director has mommy issues? Two for the Road (1967) Tim's fiftieth anniversary revisit Podcast 9.9 Battle of the Sexes, Beach Rats and mother! discussed Academy Expels Weinstein Nathaniel sees the end of an era Smackdown 85 The Color Purple, Agnes of God, and more 5 Takeaways from the Success of It Spencer lists
See full article at FilmExperience »

Joan Fontaine Centennial: The Witches (1966)

by Jason Adams

Tell me if you've heard this plot before: a closed-minded outsider with a sordid spiritual history comes to a rural UK village where they slowly unravel a plot involving each and every member of the town being in on the ritual sacrifice of a virginal young woman, with a twist. You're thinking The Wicker Man, right? Well seven years before Christopher Lee did his exuberant little dance beside that infamous flaming totem Joan Fontaine got there first in 1966's The Witches, an actual Hammer production (I always think The Wicker Man is from Hammer, but it ain't) that really doesn't get the love it earns...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Joan Fontaine Centennial: Jane Eyre (1943)

Part two of our Joan Fontaine celebration. Here's Tim Brayton...

Joan Fontaine's reign at the top of the Hollywood pyramid was short and intense: three out of four movies made in three out of four years netted her Oscar nominations, with a win for the second, Suspicion. We come now to the film made immediately after this golden run: the second talkie adaptation of Charlotte Brontë's 1847 classic Jane Eyre, released in the United Kingdom at the very end of 1943, but held back from the U.S. until February, 1944.

By the time the film arrived at 20th Century Fox, it had already passed through the hands of super-producer David O. Selznick, who had assembled all of the main components in an apparent bid to replicate his Oscar-winning Rebecca. Fontaine appears once again as a delicate, innocent ingénue dropped into a rambling Gothic mansion where a bullying man falls in love with her,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Fontaine Centennial: Mrs de Winter in "Rebecca"

For the next few days we'll be celebrating Joan Fontaine's Centennial. Here's Eric on her most famous picture...

David O. Selznick, Joan Fontaine, and Alfred Hitchcock at the Oscars for Rebecca. The film won... but Fontaine and Hitch didn't.

One of the best things about writing for The Film Experience is the chance to open up windows of your film history you haven’t explored before. For some reason, throughout all the years, I had never seen a movie with Joan Fontaine. Just one of those black holes. And because she stopped acting before I was born, I have zero frame of reference for her (unlike, say, sister Olivia de Havilland)...
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Forgotten: Billy Wilder's "The Emperor Waltz" (1948)

  • MUBI
Billy Wilder always more or less disowned his one real musical, which leaves the enthusiast with a choice: keep re-watching the classic Wilder films, of which there are many, or probe into the obscure, disreputable corners of the great man's oeuvre?The year was 1948. Wilder had been involved with the war effort. Lost Weekend had belatedly come out in 1945 and won an Oscar for Ray Milland. And while the rest of Hollywood was churning out movies that developed the film noir genre Wilder had helped launch with Double Indemnity, he made a Bing Crosby musical set in Austria. He claimed it was offered to him, but the script is credited to Wilder and Charles Brackett, so he can't distance himself that easily."On a December night, some forty-odd years ago, His Majesty Franz Joseph the First, Emperor of Austria, Apostolic King of Hungary, King of Bohemia, Dalmatia, Croatia, Slavonia, Galicia,
See full article at MUBI »

September 5th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Blade Runner: The Final Cut, Raw, The Spell (1977)

  • DailyDead
Happy September, guys! This month’s home entertainment releases are wasting no time, as Tuesday looks to be another stellar day of horror and sci-fi titles coming our way. For those of you excited for Blade Runner 2049, Warner Bros. is putting out The Final Cut version of Ridley Scott’s original masterpiece in 4K Ultra HD, and Criterion is giving Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca their trademarked HD treatment with a stunning new release.

As far as new indie horror movies go, both A Dark Song and Raw come home this Tuesday and are well worth your time, and for those of you Winchester brothers fans out there, the 12th season of Supernatural is being released this week, too.

Other notable titles for September 5th include The Spell, The Atoning, The Basement, I Saw What You Did, and a 4K Ultra HD release of The Cabin in the Woods.

Blade Runner
See full article at DailyDead »

Jamaica’s New Film Commissioner Brings Shorts to the Forefront

Jampro has partnered with the Jamaica Film and Television Association (Jafta), and the Chase Fund to deliver Jafta Propella –a script to screen program which nurtures Jamaican content creators and enables them to tell their stories cinematically by providing funding and in-kind support.

Renee Robinson, a native Jamaican, is the new(ish) Film Commissioner of Jamaica, now in her second year of a three year term. In fact the first film professional to hold the office of Film Commissioner, she has instituted changes geared toward helping emerging filmmakers hone their talents to make Jamaica great again. She is a multi-lingual cultural industry strategist and thought-leader who has worked in Canada, Europe, South Africa, and the Caribbean in film, television, digital media, arts and culture, entertainment, and communications. With almost two decades of senior management experience in content programming, regulation/ policy, strategic planning, and industry intelligence, she has held in leadership
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

‘Certain Women,’ ‘The Piano Teacher,’ and More Join The Criterion Collection in September

While the vast majority of our favorite films of last year have been treated with Blu-ray releases, one title near the top of the list we’ve been waiting the longest for is Kelly Reichardt‘s Certain Women. It looks like it’s been worth the wait as The Criterion Collection have unveiled their September releases and it’s leading the pack (with special features also an interview with the director and Todd Haynes!).

Also getting a release in September, is Michael Haneke‘s Isabelle Huppert-led The Piano Teacher and the recent documentary David Lynch: The Art Life (arriving perfectly-timed to the end of the new Twin Peaks). There’s also Alfred Hitchcock‘s classic psychodrama Rebecca and the concert film Festival, featuring Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Johnny Cash, and many more.

Check out the high-resolution cover art and full details on the releases below, with more on Criterion’s site.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Criterion Collection Announces September 2017 Titles, Including ‘Certain Women’ and ‘Rebecca’

Criterion Collection Announces September 2017 Titles, Including ‘Certain Women’ and ‘Rebecca’
Five new movies are joining the Criterion Collection in September, two of which were released in the last year: Kelly Reichardt’s spare, moving “Certain Women” and the documentary “David Lynch: The Art Life.” Also getting the Criterion treatment are Michael Haneke’s “The Piancho Teacher,” starring Isabelle Huppert; “Rebecca,” Alfred Hitchcock’s adaptation of the Daphne du Maurier novel and his first American production; and Murray Lerner’s documentary “Festival,” which features performances by Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash, among others.

It isn’t Criterion’s most exciting month, but there’s still much to look forward to. Details below, including Criterion’s own descriptions:

Read More: Criterion Collection Announces August 2017 Additions, Including Restored ‘Sid & Nancy’ and Mike Leigh’s ‘Meantime

Rebecca

“Romance becomes psychodrama in Alfred Hitchcock’s elegantly crafted ‘Rebecca,’ his first foray into Hollywood filmmaking. A dreamlike adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s 1938 novel, the film
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe’

‘Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe’
Opening in L.A. and other cities June 16, “Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe” is a stylishly accomplished and intellectually well thought out character study of a man who was the most popular author in the world in the 1920s and 1930s and who, today, is nearly forgotten. Told through six windows of 20 minutes each, this unique storytelling technique gives the film an immediacy as each part of Stefan Zweig’s life plays out in real time.

Stefan Zweig’s books have been made into 23 movies around the world, including his novel, Letter from an Unknown Woman, which was adapted to the screen in 1948 by Max Ophüls and starred Joan Fontaine and Louis Jourdain. His writings have also inspired Wes Anderson’s “Grand Budapest Hotel”.

Having just read his memoir, The World of Yesterday and having been on my own private search for what it means to have to leave your
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Lgbt Pride Month: TCM Showcases Gay and Lesbian Actors and Directors

Considering everything that's been happening on the planet in the last several months, you'd have thought we're already in November or December – of 2117. But no. It's only June. 2017. And in some parts of the world, that's the month of brides, fathers, graduates, gays, and climate change denial. Beginning this evening, Thursday, June 1, Turner Classic Movies will be focusing on one of these June groups: Lgbt people, specifically those in the American film industry. Following the presentation of about 10 movies featuring Frank Morgan, who would have turned 127 years old today, TCM will set its cinematic sights on the likes of William Haines, James Whale, George Cukor, Mitchell Leisen, Dorothy Arzner, Patsy Kelly, and Ramon Novarro. In addition to, whether or not intentionally, Claudette Colbert, Colin Clive, Katharine Hepburn, Douglass Montgomery (a.k.a. Kent Douglass), Marjorie Main, and Billie Burke, among others. But this is ridiculous! Why should TCM present a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites