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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 25 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Screenwriter Walter Bernstein at 95: Still Front and Center

22 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ask Walter Bernstein what makes for a good screenplay, and he’ll answer you with a (possibly apocryphal) story about Henry David Thoreau. “He was living out at Walden Pond and a friend came to tell him that Samuel Morse had just made the first successful wireless telegraph transmission from Boston to Portland, or something like that,” Bernstein says with the practiced storyteller’s delight in a well-told tale. “And Thoreau asked, ‘But what did it say?’ That’s always stuck with me. With all the technology and everything else, what’s it about?”

“What’s it about?” is a question Bernstein, who turned 95 this month, has been asking himself in one form or another for most of his 65-year career, which has stretched from the early days of live television to the modern era of binge watching, and from the lionized “golden age” of the studio system to the low-budget indie renaissance. »

- Scott Foundas

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Here's What's New on Netflix for August 2014

30 July 2014 1:20 PM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

If you're like us, you can't wait for the first day of every month, because you know that Netflix is going to add a ton of new movies and TV shows. You refresh your account over and over again at midnight, hoping that those titles listed in the "Recently Added" section update with something new and exciting rather than the same ol' titles you've been staring at for the last four weeks.

Well, lo and behold, we've gathered the most exciting movies and TV shows being added to America's most popular streaming service, straight from Netflix themselves.

"Rocky" fans will be pumped to know that the first five boxing flicks (sorry, "Rocky Balboa" fans) will be added August 1, joining other '70s, '80s, and '90s movie favorites "Face/Off" (slow-motion doves!), "Mad Max" (apocalyptic leather!), "Spice World" (spice up your life!), "The Birdcage" (Calista Flockhart was in this, »

- Tim Hayne

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“Relative”-ly Speaking: The Top 10 Oscar-winning Family Combinations

17 June 2014 3:27 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Who says that movie-making talent cannot run within the same family? In the film industry when one reaches the pinnacle of success in achieving the ultimate reward in the motion picture business–winning an Academy Award–it is considered an individual milestone for any actor’s big screen career. However, when one’s gene pool produces the capacity to draw Oscar’s attention their way in keeping the golden statuette “in the family” it is living proof that the thespian’s apple does not fall from the street.

Whether through the relationship of blood relatives or marital unions “Relative”-ly Speaking: The Top 10 Oscar-winning Family Combinations looks at ten famous family member combos that won an Oscar through the methods of acting or directing.  Let’s take a look at the top ten familial tandem that pulled off such an achievement in winning the coveted Oscar as it stands proudly on the family mantle. »

- Frank Ochieng

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What does 1941 mean to you? (The Smackdown Cometh!)

21 May 2014 8:04 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

The Supporting Actress Smackdown, 1941 Edition, hits these parts on Saturday May 31st (here's the full summer calendar). This month we'll be discussing Mary Astor in The Great Lie, Sara Allgood in How Green Was My Valley, Margaret Wycherly in Sergeant York, Teresa Wright and Patricia Collinge, both in The Little Foxes

1941 winners: Gary Cooper, Joan Fontaine, Mary Astor & Donald Crisp. Note how the supporting actors used to win a plaque instead of a statue!

It's time to introduce our panel as we dive into that film year next week with little goodies strewn about the usual postings.

Remember You are part of the panel. So get your votes in by e-mailing Nathaniel with 1941 in the subject line and giving these supporting actresses their heart rankings (1 for awful to 5 for brilliant). Please only vote on the performances you've seen. The votes are averaged so it doesn't hurt a performance to be underseen. »

- NATHANIEL R

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How Hammer Got Its Scare Back

8 April 2014 4:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

It has been dismissed over the years as cheesy, cheap and laughable but, as has been the case on many occasions, Hammer Films have had the last laugh. They boast a back-catalogue that is to horror movies what The Rolling Stones’ discography is to rock music. Fifty-nine years after the release of their first horror movie proper (The Quatermass Xperiment), Hammer’s films have survived scrutiny and re-evaluation and have now attained National Treasure status. Moreover, in terms of sheer importance, the Hammer films were some of the most influential of the past half-century. The ripple-effect of their imitators cashing in on their success would beget the careers of some of the biggest names in Hollywood today.

And yet since 1984 Hammer has been a dormant entity, existing only in the memory: a pile of ashes, a cape and a signet ring waiting to be reanimated by the crimson, jugular discharge of some poor, »

- Cai Ross

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Living Legends: Kim Novak & More Classic Hollywood Stars Alive Today (Photos)

3 March 2014 4:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

The death of Shirley Temple, one of the last great stars of Hollywood's Golden Age, came soon after the passing of two other classic actors, Joan Fontaine and Peter O'Toole. While we mourn their losses, there are still more actors from that era alive than you may realize, including Fontaine's older sister Olivia De Havilland, the oldest living Oscar winner, Luise Rainer, and "Vertigo" star Kim Novak -- who you may have seen at the Oscars this year.

Let's celebrate the handful of tough guys, musical dames and at least one last living child star from the early days of Hollywood that are still with us: We found 25 stars over age 80 in all, many of whom are still very busy acting. »

- Sharon Knolle

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Recap: '12 Years a Slave' Triumphs at Oscars

2 March 2014 9:29 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

12 Years a Slave, Gravity, Frozen, Blue Jasmine's Cate Blanchett, 12 Years' Lupita Nyong'o and Dallas Buyers Club's Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto were among the big winners during the star-studded telecast of the 86th Academy Awards, hosted by Ellen DeGeneres live from the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. Read on for the recap...

12 Years a Slave, Gravity, Frozen, Blue Jasmine's Cate Blanchett, 12 Years' Lupita Nyong'o and Dallas Buyers Club's Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto were among the big winners during the star-studded telecast of the 86th Academy Awards, hosted by Ellen DeGeneres live from the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, while there was no statuette love for big contenders The Wolf of Wall Street, Nebraska, American Hustle or Captain Phillips. Read on for the recap...

Click Here for the complete list of winners.

The Best Picture

12 Years a Slave, the true story of Solomon Northrup's arduous journey from free man to slave and back again, was named »

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Bette Midler'.s '.Wind Beneath My Wings'. Performance Receives Standing Ovation At The Oscars

2 March 2014 9:00 PM, PST | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

Better Midler appeared on stage at the 86th Academy Awards following the show’s annual In Memoriam segment to sing her heart-wrenching classic, “Wind Beneath My Wings.”

Bette Midler's Oscar Performance

Midler, as elegant as ever, graced the Oscars with her legendary talent. The 68-year-old singer and actress took to the stage in a custom Alaia gown paired with Christian Louboutin shoes. Belting out the emotional ballad, Midler appeared to tear up, while leaving few dry eyes in the audience. At the end of the performance, she received an enthusiastic standing ovation.

The standing ovation caused Midler, a three-time Grammy winner and two-time Oscar nominee, to feel like an Olympian.

Everyone wants to know what I said off mic at the end of the song. I said "I feel like I just won the Olympics!"...

Bette Midler (@BetteMidler) March 3, 2014

Among those honored during the In Memoriam tribute, introduced by Glenn Close, »

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Oscars 2014: Bette Midler lends a mighty 'In Memoriam' assist

2 March 2014 8:55 PM, PST | Zap2It - From Inside the Box | See recent Zap2It - From Inside the Box news »

The annual "In Memoriam" segment honoring recently deceased talents had extra emotional punch at Sunday's 86th Academy Awards, for several reasons.

Introduced by Glenn Close, the tribute was bound to have impact through its spotlighting of unexpected deaths during the past year, such as those of "Capote" Oscar winner Philip Seymour Hoffman and "The Fast and the Furious" franchise star Paul Walker.

Presented without the audience applause that sometimes accompanies mentions of particularly beloved talents, the segment was set to John Barry's memorable theme music from "Somewhere in Time." That was an especially meaningful choice, since veteran fantasy writer Richard Matheson -- who died last June, and was included in the salute -- adapted that film's screenplay from his novel "Bid Time Return."

Stylized photos of the late actors, directors, writers, musicians and other craftspeople often were accompanied by clips of their work, as with Peter O'Toole ("Lawrence of Arabia »

- editorial@zap2it.com

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Oscars Mention ‘Midnight Rider’ Victim Sarah Jones During ‘In Memoriam’ Segment

2 March 2014 8:11 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Sarah Jones, the “Midnight Ride” camera assistant who died Feb. 20, received a brief mention at the end of the “In Memoriam” segment in the Academy Awards telecast.

Jones wasn’t included in the photos segment but a note at the conclusion said she had been included in on the Oscars.com site, where it was 37th of 111 photos.

On the in memoriam photo gallery on the Oscar’s official website, Jones appears on slide No. 37 of the 111 honored.

Jones, 27, was killed in a train accident while filming in Georgia. About 800 people attended a memorial Sunday in Altanta, where her spirit and kindness were heralded.

Friends and associated of Jones had been campaigning for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to include her in the “In Memoriam’ televised segment, which began Sunday with James Gandolfini.

Other film industry figures recognized included Karen Black, Tom Laughlin, Carmen Zapata, Hal Needham, »

- Dave McNary

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Living Legends: Classic Hollywood Stars Alive Today (Photos)

1 March 2014 4:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

The death of Shirley Temple, one of the last great stars of Hollywood's Golden Age, came soon after the passing of two other classic actors, Joan Fontaine and Peter O'Toole. While we mourn their losses, there are still more actors from that era alive than you may realize, including Fontaine's older sister Olivia De Havilland and the oldest living Oscar winner, Luise Rainer.

Let's celebrate the handful of tough guys, musical dames and at least one last living child star from the early days of Hollywood that are still with us: We found 25 stars over age 80 in all, many of whom are still very busy acting. »

- Sharon Knolle

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Italy’s Taviani Brothers Set To Shoot ‘Decameron’ Adaptation

27 February 2014 6:56 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome – Venerable Italian helming duo Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, whose “Caesar Must Die” won the 2012 Berlin Golden Bear, will shoot “Maraviglioso Boccaccio,” an adaptation of Giovanni Boccaccio’s 14th century classic “The Decameron,” with cameras set to start rolling next week in a villa on the outskirts of Florence.

For their take on “Decameron” the Taviani Brothers have assembled an ensemble cast of Italo A-listers, including Riccardo Scamarcio (“Third Person”), Jasmine Trinca (“Miele”), Kasia Smutniak (“From Paris with Love”), and teen Rosabell Laurenti Sellers (“Balancing Act”).

Rome shingle Stemal is producing with financing from Rai Cinema and subsidy support from Italy’s cultural ministry.

In Boccaccio’s “Decameron” seven young women and three young men take refuge in a villa outside Florence to escape the city’s 1348 plague known as the Black Death.

“What is the plague today? It’s an epidemic of disillusionment” the Taviani’s said in an »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Oscars In Memoriam: Recent Deaths Put Extra Pressure on Academy

25 February 2014 4:07 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Oscars are coming Sunday, so get ready for controversy. No, not about politics, Woody Allen or even the Oscar results. Every year, one of the show’s most beloved segments, and the one that stirs up the most heated debates is the In Memoriam sequence.

An online petition is requesting that the Oscar segment include Sarah Jones, the 27-year-old Atlanta crew member killed by a train while filming “Midnight Rider.” That petition is touching and heartfelt, and I agree that any worker, in any field, deserves special recognition if he or she died in the line of duty.

But it would be unprecedented to include a crew member whose name is not widely known. Bottom line: Every person shown in the segment will deserve to be there. But not every deserving person Will be there, because time is limited. Academy reps are nearly always mum about who is included. »

- Tim Gray

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Oscar Loves a Woman on the Edge: Eight Iconic Best Actress Snubs (Clips)

25 February 2014 10:40 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Why does cinema favor the mad woman? It's easy to see why Oscar does: roles like Jasmine French give an actress space to not only chew but swallow and spit up scene after scene. Cate Blanchett will almost certainly win Best Actress this year for her frittered, diabolical performance in "Blue Jasmine" as cinema's archetypical woman-on-the-verge: that pill-popping, martini-swilling mad Medea who men fear and women sometimes dream of (being? playing? escaping into?).Thus, here are eight classic Oscar snubs in the Best Actress category. Bow down to Gena Rowlands in "A Woman Under the Influence." Watch clips after the jump. Also, check out our Toh! feature on eight scene-stealing female performances from 2013.1940 Who Won: Ginger Rogers ("Kitty Foyle") Who Should've Won: Joan Fontaine ("Rebecca") Who Was Nominated: Bette Davis ("The Letter"), Katharine Hepburn ("The Philadelphia Story"), Martha Scott ("Our Town") Hitchock's delirious and deliciously twisted English gothic »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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So long, linkwell, au wiedersehen, adieu

23 February 2014 9:24 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Policy Mic Olivia Wilde humorously condemns Hollywood's sexism with a gender reversal anecdote

Chicago Tribune really strong piece on the camerawork and cutting (or lack of it) in the three films dominating the Oscar race: 12 Years a Slave, Gravity, and American Hustle 

Gawker a sad day for Sound of Music fans. The last remaining member of the original Von Trapp family singers has died.

NY Times great interview with RuPaul on his unlikely career now in its second huge act

Salon looks at Oscar Original Songs that time forgot. But this is really just scratching the surface. There's a couple of them each year!

Backlots a letter about Joan Fontaine from her friend and secretary

In Contention 12 Years a Slave wins 4 prizes and The Butler wins Best Actor at the NAACP Image Awards »

- NATHANIEL R

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Horror Channel Strikes Blow With More Hammer Double-Bills!

14 February 2014 2:16 PM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Voluptuous vampire vixens, undead slaves, cobra-women, grisly murders and creepy aliens.  Yes, Hammer heaven continues throughout March as the UK’s number one TV destination for all things horror brings you five more Hammer horror double-bills, which broadcast from Sat March 1st – Sat March 29th from 9.00pm on the Horror Channel!

Sat 1 March @ 21:00 – The Plague Of The Zombies (1966) 

Directed by John Gilling, this is Hammer’s sole foray into the Zombie genre and centres on a mad Cornish squire who solves a labour crisis in his tin mines by turning local villagers into voodoo-controlled zombies. Dr. Thompson (Brook Williams) and his daughter Alice (Jacqueline Pearce) soon discover the unpleasant nocturnal habits of the shambling undead slaves, and Sir James Forbes (André Morell) arrives to investigate.

Sat 1 March  @  22:45 – Captain Kronos – Vampire Hunter (1974)

Considered one of the last great Hammer films, this swash-buckling vampire yarn, features a master swordsman, a »

- David Agnew

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Alfred Hitchcock’s 10 Best Female Roles, In Honor of Kim Novak’s Birthday

13 February 2014 2:43 PM, PST | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

Happy birthday to the glamorous Kim Novak, who is 81 today. It’s impossible to think of Novak without remembering her shock blonde super-coif in Vertigo (not to mention the way she werrrrrked Edith Head‘s form-sucking pencil skirts), and thus, it’s impossible to think of Novak without remembering the great female roles in Hitchcock movies. Here are my picks for the 10 best.

10. Miss Froy in The Lady Vanishes (Dame May Whitty)

This is sort of a gonzo first pick, but give it up: The Lady Vanishes rules and Dame May Whitty, with all her grandmotherly charms, is just a subversive ol’ hoot as the bad-ass spy who sets up the intrigue of the story. This is the kind of role Margaret Rutherford would win an Oscar for. You underestimate the depth of how much she kicks ass.

9. Marnie in Marnie (Tippi Hedren)

Is it wild? Oh, yes. Is it sometimes a little embarrassing? »

- Louis Virtel

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Beauty vs. Beast: An Introduction

12 February 2014 2:00 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Ja from Mnpp here with a fun new weekly game for us to play!

One of the reasons I love horror films is because more than most genres they give us the chance to see how movies can manipulate their audience into morally tricky identification territory. I find it fascinating, from a psychological standpoint, seeing how a master like say Alfred Hitchcock can use cinema to turn the simple act of mopping up a bathroom into widespread criminal complicity. Some times the bad guys are just so much more interesting than the good guys, ya know? So that's what this here series is about - I'm going to give you a film's protagonist and its antagonist, list a couple of their pros and their cons, and then you're gonna tell me whose team you're on. This week I give you...

Mrs. Danvers vs. The Second Mrs. de Winter in Rebecca »

- JA

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One of Top Stars of Hollywood's Studio Era and Later on a pro-Vietnam War, 'Conservative' Republican, Has Died

11 February 2014 7:04 AM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Shirley Temple dead at 85: Was one of the biggest domestic box office draws of the ’30s (photo: Shirley Temple in the late ’40s) Shirley Temple, one of the biggest box office draws of the 1930s in the United States, died Monday night, February 10, 2014, at her home in Woodside, near San Francisco. The cause of death wasn’t made public. Shirley Temple (born in Santa Monica on April 23, 1928) was 85. Shirley Temple became a star in 1934, following the release of Paramount’s Alexander Hall-directed comedy-tearjerker Little Miss Marker, in which Temple had the title role as a little girl who, left in the care of bookies, almost loses her childlike ways before coming around to regenerate Adolphe Menjou and his gang. That same year, Temple became a Fox contract player, and is credited with saving the studio — 20th Century Fox from 1935 on — from bankruptcy. Whether or not that’s true is a different story, »

- Andre Soares

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Schell as Director: Three Academy Award Nominations for His Films

1 February 2014 7:47 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Maximilian Schell movie director (photo: Maximilian Schell and Maria Schell) (See previous post: “Maximilian Schell Dies: Best Actor Oscar Winner for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg.’”) Maximilian Schell’s first film as a director was the 1970 (dubbed) German-language release First Love / Erste Liebe, adapted from Igor Turgenev’s novella, and starring Englishman John Moulder-Brown, Frenchwoman Dominique Sanda, and Schell in this tale about a doomed love affair in Czarist Russia. Italian Valentina Cortese and British Marius Goring provided support. Directed by a former Best Actor Oscar winner, First Love, a movie that could just as easily have been dubbed into Swedish or Swahili (or English), ended up nominated for the Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award. Three years later, nominated in that same category was Schell’s second feature film as a director, The Pedestrian / Der Fußgänger, in which a car accident forces a German businessman to delve deep into his past. »

- Andre Soares

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004

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