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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 22 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Sergio Leone’s Heirs to Produce Spaghetti Western TV Series Titled ‘Colt’ (Exclusive)

13 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome — Italy’s expanding Leone Film Group is venturing into the Spaghetti Western territory so dear to its late great founder with an English-language TV series titled “Colt,” based on an idea developed by Sergio Leone, master of the genre.

The concept is centered around the six-shooter packed by Clint Eastwood in “For a Fistful of Dollars.”

“It’s from my father’s idea in which the gun was the main character and the device through which the tale is told,” said Raffaella Leone, who now runs Leone Film Group with her brother Andrea.

“We are thinking of six episodes, each one connected to a single gun shot. But we could do more,” she added.

Italian director Stefano Sollima, who has made a name for himself helming Sky’s naturalistic Neapolitan mob drama “Gomorra,” which is Italy’s all time top TV export, will direct the first two episodes and act as showrunner. »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Sergio Leone’s Heirs to Produce Spaghetti Western TV Series Titled ‘Colt’ (Exclusive)

13 hours ago | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Rome — Italy’s expanding Leone Film Group is venturing into the Spaghetti Western territory so dear to its late great founder with an English-language TV series titled “Colt,” based on an idea developed by Sergio Leone, master of the genre.

The concept is centered around the six-shooter packed by Clint Eastwood in “For a Fistful of Dollars.”

“It’s from my father’s idea in which the gun was the main character and the device through which the tale is told,” said Raffaella Leone, who now runs Leone Film Group with her brother Andrea.

“We are thinking of six episodes, each one connected to a single gun shot. But we could do more,” she added.

Italian director Stefano Sollima, who has made a name for himself helming Sky’s naturalistic Neapolitan mob drama “Gomorra,” which is Italy’s all time top TV export, will direct the first two episodes and act as showrunner. »

- Nick Vivarelli

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The Sum of All Fears: Sidney Lumet’s "Fail-Safe"

9 May 2016 8:32 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Mubi is showing Sidney Lumet's Fail-Safe (1964) May 7 - June 6 and Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) May 8 - June 7, 2016 in the UK.“Yes, it’s a hard day. Goodbye, my friend.”— General Koniev, Fail-Safe“Jack, this is Helen.”— Helen Grady, Fail-SafeTiming was everything during the Cold War. A matter of life and death, democracy or communism, us versus them. And, for true megalomaniacs, my motion picture against your motion picture. In January 1963, Stanley Kubrick filed a lawsuit to halt the production of Fail-Safe, an upcoming adaptation of the recently published novel by Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler. A political thriller about nuclear war, it was being directed by Sidney Lumet and starred Henry Fonda. Kubrick’s charge was plagiarism: Fail-Safe, the director claimed, was a copy in all but name of Peter George’s Red Alert, the 1958 novel that »

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Roland Emmerich Hatches Plans For Battle Of Midway Movie

4 May 2016 1:49 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Independence Day: Resurgence director and all-round maestro of cinematic destruction Roland Emmerich has teed up plans for his next movie and, spoilers, it doesn’t involve vengeful aliens.

Addressing the crowd at a special Fox screening of Independence Day, designed to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the original blockbuster, Emmerich announced plans to create a war film based on the Battle of Midway. Set during the throes of World War II and, in particular, soon after Japan’s stealth attack on Pearl Harbor, it’ll follow an American plan to coordinate a deadly attack on a Japanese fleet.

It was a gruelling maritime battle that stretched for four days, but ultimately resulted in an emphatic victory for the Allies, who were able to intercept Japanese radio transmissions to pinpoint the exact location of the doomed fleet.

First reported by Coming Soon, here’s what Emmerich had to share about the »

- Michael Briers

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Roland Emmerich Planning Battle of the Midway Movie

4 May 2016 9:47 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Roland Emmerich has unveiled plans for a movie about 1942’s Battle of the Midway.

The producer-director made the announcement Tuesday night prior to a 20th anniversary screening on the Fox lot of his 1996 blockbuster “Independence Day.” Emmerich’s sequel, “Independence Day: Resurgence,” will open June 24.

The four-day battle took place six months after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, and saw the U.S. Navy decisively defeat an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy. U.S. codebreakers were able to determine the time and place of the planned attack, enabling the U.S. Navy to prepare its own ambush.

“At the time, the Americans were the underdog,” Emmerich told the crowd. “It was one of those moments where, against all odds, people came together and did the impossible. A lot of pilots died in this battle. I want to make a monument to them and it would be great »

- Dave McNary

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The Greatest One-Location Movies of All-Time

28 April 2016 11:13 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

There’s something claustrophobic about a film set entirely in a single location, an unsettling feeling of being cornered in a confined environment, cut off from the rest of the world. Stories such as these require nuanced characters and thoughtful attention to narrative detail, many of which employ a theatrical feel, while others were literally sprung from a playwright’s pen. Their action sequences are merely verbal, characters revealing shocking truths and saying the unthinkable, while the setting forces them together until an often brutal conclusion. When people are trapped like rats, it’s no surprise they sometimes eat each other.

A new entry in this sub-genre, Green Room, a violent thriller from Blue Ruin director Jeremy Saulnier expands this weekend. In the film, after a punk band witnesses a vicious murder, they find themselves trapped in the club’s green room, forced to fight their way out to freedom. »

- Tony Hinds

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‘The People v. O.J. Simpson’ Finale: Producers Weigh in on the Verdict, the Jury and That Knife

5 April 2016 8:33 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Spoiler alert: Do not read until you’ve watched the Season 1 finale of “The People v. O.J. Simpson,” Episode 10, titled “The Verdict.”

Let’s get what we all knew was coming out of the way: In the series, as in life, O.J. Simpson was acquitted of the charges against him. But the not guilty verdict was never the point. For the producers of FX’s “The People v. O.J. Simpson,” their story was always about the journey, not the destination.

Executive producers Larry Karaszewski and Scott Alexander tell Variety they’ve been overwhelmed by the reaction to the show. “I think we always really believed in the story and the quality of the work that everyone was doing, but it’s not only just simply that people are watching, it’s that people are talking about it,” says Karaszewski. “They’re talking about the themes that we brought up, like »

- Debra Birnbaum

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Maggie Blye, Actress in the Original 'The Italian Job,' Dies at 73

29 March 2016 1:08 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Maggie Blye, the blond Houston actress who supported such action films as Hombre, Hard Times and the original The Italian Job, has died. She was 73. Blye died on March 24 in West Hollywood after a two-year battle with cancer, her sister, casting director Judy Blye Wilson (The Young and the Restless), announced. Blye also portrayed the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor and Henry Fonda's characters in Ash Wednesday (1973) and appeared in Waterhole #3 (1967) opposite Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn and in Diamonds for Breakfast (1968) with Marcello Mastroianni. Blye stood out as the girlfriend of Benny Hill's

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- Mike Barnes

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Earl Hamner Jr., Creator of ‘The Waltons,’ Dies at 92

24 March 2016 7:29 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Earl Hamner Jr., the creator and narrator of CBS’ beloved, long-running family drama “The Waltons,” died Thursday in Los Angeles. He was 92 and had been diagnosed with cancer in June 2014, according to a Facebook post by his daughter.

She wrote: “I want to thank each and every one of you for your prayers, good wishes and kind thoughts – I can assure you that they sustained Dad and helped him to recover enough to proudly witness the final production of ‘Earl Hamner: Storyteller’, become the honored recipient of the Will Geer Theatricum Botanicum Humanitarian Award, and accept Media Heritage Founder’s Award. There is not a doubt in my mind that he would not have made it this far without you — and we had the good fortune to keep him in our lives a bit longer despite the odds against him. He never got enough of this great gift of »

- Carmel Dagan

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Earl Hamner Jr., Creator of ‘The Waltons,’ Dies at 92

24 March 2016 7:29 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Earl Hamner Jr., the creator and narrator of CBS’ beloved, long-running family drama “The Waltons,” died Thursday in Los Angeles. He was 92 and had been diagnosed with cancer in June 2014, according to a Facebook post by his daughter.

She wrote: “I want to thank each and every one of you for your prayers, good wishes and kind thoughts – I can assure you that they sustained Dad and helped him to recover enough to proudly witness the final production of ‘Earl Hamner: Storyteller’, become the honored recipient of the Will Geer Theatricum Botanicum Humanitarian Award, and accept Media Heritage Founder’s Award. There is not a doubt in my mind that he would not have made it this far without you — and we had the good fortune to keep him in our lives a bit longer despite the odds against him. He never got enough of this great gift of »

- Carmel Dagan

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Director Peter Medak Plans to Resurrect The Ghost of Peter Sellers

21 March 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

It was 1973 and Peter Medak was a hot director on the rise. Following the success of The Ruling Class, which had earned Peter O’Toole an Academy Award nomination the previous year, United Artists offered him Death Wish. But when the studio insisted on casting Charles Bronson instead of Medak’s pick, Henry Fonda, Medak passed on the project. Back in London, Medak ran into his friend Peter Sellers, who asked him to direct his next film, Ghost in The Noonday Sun, which was set to be filmed on the island of Cyprus. Somehow the idea of filming a 17th-century pirate comedy aboard real ships on […] »

- Paula Bernstein

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Mercedes McCambridge in "The Concorde... Airport '79"

15 March 2016 9:15 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Tim here. Now we come to the sad part of our centennial tribute to Mercedes McCambridge. For like so many movie stars, her career ended with a damp fizzle, not with any last triumphs. Worse yet, her career started rolling to a close in the 1970s, when Hollywood hit upon its most degrading scheme ever for what to do with its old legends and workhorses: stuff them into the enormous ensembles of tacky disaster films. At its most prestigious, this phenomenon resulted in Fred Astaire getting his solitary career Oscar nomination for The Towering Inferno. At its least prestigious, you have living legends Henry Fonda, Olivia de Havilland, and Fred MacMurray in a death race to see who can embarrass themselves the worst in The Swarm.

Or, for that matter, you have McCambridge herself, grossly misused and discarded in The Concorde... Airport '79. It's the fourth and final film in the rather dimwitted Airport franchise, »

- Tim Brayton

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Oscars Facts: 25 Things You (Probably) Don't Know About the Academy Awards

26 February 2016 7:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

It's almost here -- the 88th Academy Awards finally airs this Sunday, and we're counting down the minutes.

We've already given you our Oscar predictions, and now we're bringing you some of the best (and, um, craziest) facts about Hollywood's biggest awards show. From the first Best Actor winner, to the "one dollar" Oscar rule, here are 25 things you (probably) don't know about the Oscars.

1. The youngest Oscar winner was Tatum O'Neal (above), who won Best Supporting Actress for "Paper Moon" (1973) when she was only 10 years old. Shirley Temple won the short-lived Juvenile Award at 6 years old.

2. After winning Best Actress for "Cabaret" (1972), Liza Minnelli became (and still is) the only Oscar winner whose parents both earned Oscars. Her mother, Judy Garland, received an honorary award in 1939 and her father, Vincente Minnelli, won Best Director for "Gigi" (1958).

3. Nameplates for all potential winners are prepared ahead of time; in 2014, the Academy made 215 of them! »

- Phil Pirrello

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Bound For Glory | Blu-ray Review

23 February 2016 1:00 PM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Biopics are best when focused on segmented portions of emotional turmoil, professional escalation or some perfect combination of the two, rather than trying to collapse entire lives into just a couple hours time. Hal Ashby’s 1976 retelling of Woody Guthrie’s popular ascent from dust bowl deadbeat to socially conscious folk music figurehead in Bound For Glory coolly pursues the latter with genuinely endearing, authentic feeling results. With David Carradine aptly filling the role of the humbly charismatic, musically driven drifter and a fully stocked catalog of Guthrie songs adapted for the screen by Leonard Rosenman, Ashby’s oddly conventional mid-period picture was in competition for the Palme d’Or, but ultimately lost to Paolo and Vittorio Taviani’s Padre Padrone.

The film was shot by the late, great Haskell Wexler the very same year he took over principal photography from Néstor Almendros on Malick’s golden glazed Days of Heaven »

- Jordan M. Smith

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Kiefer Sutherland's Emotional Reaction To Working Opposite His Father

19 February 2016 6:03 PM, PST | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

There are numerous families that are something of Hollywood royalty, where multiple generations have been stars on the big and small screens. Sometimes these generations get to work with one another, and on occasion, real life parents and children even get to parents and children in a project.think Jane and Henry Fonda in On Golden Pond. 24 star Kiefer Sutherland recently had the chance to star opposite his Golden Globe winning father, Donald Sutherland, and it was apparently a deeply emotional moment. Kiefer and Donald Sutherland took the opportunity to work together in the upcoming western, Forsaken, where they, surprise, surprise, play a father and son. Though the younger Sutherland prepared himself to work with his father ahead of time, when it actually went down, he told the La Times that it was overwhelming. He said: As much as I planned as an actor that this is what I want »

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BFI Review – The Lady Eve (1941)

10 February 2016 12:50 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Lady Eve, 1941.

Directed by Preston Sturges.

Starring Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda.

Synopsis:

A con-woman, and her family, have their eyes on a rich man who joins their cruise ship. But love is in the air…

We know Eve. The temptress seducing Adam to take a bite out of the apple in the Garden of Eden. Preston Sturges The Lady Eve, starring Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda, takes this temptress and places her in America, whereby an affluent and naïve chap is the Adam to the money-hungry Eve. The Lady Eve takes some of the memorable screwball comedy clichés of the era, including some pratfalls from the silent comedians, and mixes it together as a sprightly concoction of romance and wealth amongst the elite members of society.

He is the son of a successful ale merchant, travelling back from South America to New York after researching snakes. She is »

- Simon Columb

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The Lady Eve Saturday Morning at The Hi-Pointe

9 February 2016 10:11 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“I need him like the ax needs the turkey!”

The Lady Eve screens this Saturday morning, February 13th at The Hi-Pointe Theater (1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117) as part of their Classic Film Series.

Barbara Stanwyck should have been court-ordered to keep a safe distance from any future cast member of My Three Sons. In Double Indemnity she cons the future Pa Douglas (Fred McMurray) into a deadly scheme. In the 1941 Preston Sturges comedy The Lady Eve, she messes with William Demarest, Uncle Charley himself, by whisking gullible Henry Fonda from under his protective glare.

Fonda plays the young heir to the Pike’s Pale Ale brewery fortune, who prefers spending his time chasing snakes in South America while his guardian Muggsy (Demarest) looks on. On a boat for home, young Pike catches the eye of Jean Harrington (Stanwyck) who sets out to scam the boy but winds up falling in love with him instead. »

- Tom Stockman

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Jane Fonda Is 'Mesmerized' by Jennifer Lawrence: 'She's the Real Deal'

2 February 2016 11:15 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Watch this on The Scene. Jane Fonda has a girl crush on Jennifer Lawrence, and she's not afraid to admit it. "For me, she's the real deal. There's very few that come along like that," Fonda told Vanity Fair for the magazine's 22nd annual Hollywood Issue. She added, "I'm just mesmerized by her." The 25-year-old Joy star and Fonda, 78, paired up for their portrait in the annual issue, both wearing plain black shirts while posing with their arms around each other. Fonda is also a little envious of the other women in Lawrence's life - namely, pals like Amy Schumer. »

- Lindsay Kimble, @lekimble

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Jane Fonda Is 'Mesmerized' by Jennifer Lawrence: 'She's the Real Deal'

2 February 2016 11:15 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Watch this on The Scene. Jane Fonda has a girl crush on Jennifer Lawrence, and she's not afraid to admit it. "For me, she's the real deal. There's very few that come along like that," Fonda told Vanity Fair for the magazine's 22nd annual Hollywood Issue. She added, "I'm just mesmerized by her." The 25-year-old Joy star and Fonda, 78, paired up for their portrait in the annual issue, both wearing plain black shirts while posing with their arms around each other. Fonda is also a little envious of the other women in Lawrence's life - namely, pals like Amy Schumer. »

- Lindsay Kimble, @lekimble

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The Wrong Man

30 January 2016 11:16 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Alfred Hitchcock's true-life saga of a man wrongly accused may be Hitchcock's most troublesome movie -- all the parts work, but does it even begin to come together? Henry Fonda is the 'ordinary victim of fate' and an excellent Vera Miles is haunting as the wife who responds to the guilt and stress by withdrawing from reality. The Wrong Man Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1956 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 105 min. / Street Date January 26, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Henry Fonda, Vera Miles, Anthony Quayle, Harold J. Stone, John Heldabrand, Doreen Lang, Norma Connolly, Lola D'Annunzio, Robert Essen, Dayton Lummis, Charles Cooper, Esther Minciotti, Laurinda Barrett, Nehemiah Persoff. Cinematography Robert Burks Art Direction Paul Sylbert Film Editor George Tomasini Original Music Bernard Herrmann Written by Maxwell Anderson and Angus MacPhail Produced and Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The Wrong Man sees Alfred Hitchcock at the end of »

- Glenn Erickson

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

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