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The Hanging Tree

“To really live, you must almost die,” sings Marty Robbins, a lesson learned by Austrian import star Maria Schell. Delmer Daves’ best western puts virtue and faithfulness to the test: Gary Cooper’s distrustful, manipulative doctor hides his dark secrets and punishes those that admire and love him. Yet the ultimate reckoning demonstrates that sins can be forgiven and goodness rewarded, even in a corrupt and lawless community. That’s a fairy tale I still want to believe in.

The Hanging Tree

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1959 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 107 min. / Street Date January 23, 2018 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Gary Cooper, Maria Schell, Karl Malden, Ben Piazza, George C. Scott, Karl Swenson, Virginia Gregg, John Dierkes, King Donovan.

Cinematography: Ted McCord

Film Editor: Owen Marks

Original Music: Max Steiner

Written by Wendell Mayes, Halsted Welles from the novel by Dorothy M. Johnson

Produced by Martin Jurow, Richard Shepherd

Directed by Delmer
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

When Gary Cooper Asked: "Where Are Tomorrow's Actors?"

When Gary Cooper Asked:
Just ahead of the 1941 New Year, silver screen icon Gary Cooper wrote a column expressing his concern about the next generation of actors, saying that "hundreds of new actors are tried out each year, yet fewer and fewer faces remain on the screen." The star, who would go on to win his first best actor Oscar in 1942, thought the studio system needed improving. Cooper's original Hollywood Reporter column is below. 

Back in 1907 the old Selig company decided to produce The Count of Monte Cristo in a place called Hollywood. That was the first motion picture ever produced...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Why Fox's '9-1-1' Isn't Your Typical TV Procedural

Fox’s 9-1-1 is throwing out the rulebook.

On paper, Ryan Murphy’s newest show has all the ingredients of the tried-and-true formula of a television procedural following the Los Angeles police force, firefighters, dispatchers and first responders. Only after watching the first few minutes do you realize it’s anything but that.

Led by an A-list trifecta with Angela Bassett, Peter Krause and Connie Britton,9-1-1 puts a twist on the classic procedural trope, structuring its stories in a way where viewers follow the relatively separate worlds in which each lead character lives -- Bassett as Detective Athena Grant, Krause as Fire Captain Bobby Nash and Britton as 911 operator Abby Clark -- with the occasional group interaction sprinkled in as the tale necessitates. As executive producer Brad Falchuk, Murphy’s longtime collaborator, tells it, the show’s unique format was the selling point.

“Audiences have become very sophisticated -- the cable audience certainly has -- and
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’ Director Jared Moshé Shares His Favorite Westerns

‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’ Director Jared Moshé Shares His Favorite Westerns
The Western is the quintessential American movie genre. Its iconography has been seared into our collective conscious: the solitary cowboy riding the endless frontier, towns struggling to survive in a lawless land, the quick-drawing gunfighter. Generations of filmmakers have engaged with those symbols, building an entire cinematic language on a genre that began with the simple premise of good “white hats” vs. bad “black hats.” In doing so, they have created mythologies, torn down legends and subverted what it means to be an American.

My exposure to the West began in the living room of my parents’ house. My father, a Sephardic Jew born and raised in Greece, shared with me the movies he loved as a child. Over the years my enthusiasm for the genre only grew as I became a history buff, a lover of myths, and eventually a filmmaker. In interviews, I’m often asked to name my favorite Western,
See full article at Indiewire »

Latin America Teems With Femme Filmmakers in Oscar Race

Latin America Teems With Femme Filmmakers in Oscar Race
With a record 27 women behind the 92 foreign-language film submissions, Variety posed the same questions to a selection of directors about their experiences. What was your biggest obstacle in making the film? What was the key to your breakthrough? What is your creative goal? Who are your filmmaking heroes? What would you like the world to know about being a woman film director and the message you want to send? Here are their stories.

Lucrecia Martel

Zama” (Argentina)

“To work with such a multi-lingual, multi-cultural cast with varied levels of experience, we had to watch our manners, be very careful not to offend anyone. But in paying such close attention to our manners, to our way of speaking, we also revealed some fears.”

Related Content Women Directors From Europe on Their Foreign-Language Films

The key to breaking through was to surround herself with a “strong crew of committed, daring and creative team players; people who love what they
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rocker Richie Sambora Kicks Off 2017 Breeder's Cup at Del Mar with Bing Crosby Classic

Rocker Richie Sambora Kicks Off 2017 Breeder's Cup at Del Mar with Bing Crosby Classic
Who knew rocker and guitarist Richie Sambora can croon with the best of them?

On Friday, the legendary guitarist and singer will show off his singing skills when he performs his rendition of Bing Crosby’s famous ditty, “Where the Turf Meets the Surf” to kick off the 2017 Breeder’s Cup World Championships at the famed Del Mar Racetrack, which overlooks the Pacific Ocean.

During opening ceremonies, the horse-race-loving Sambora will sing the nostalgic song – which happens to be the official anthem of the historic track.

Crosby wrote the tune about the glamorous, oceanfront racetrack he founded in 1937 with other
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

S.O.S. Tidal Wave

Republic raids an early Rko talkie for a fantastic special effects sequence, and you won’t believe how it’s repurposed — in a story about a TV personality (in 1939!) taking on a corrupt political mob. New York crumbles and is then washed away — sort of. It’s yet another resurfacing of a title that not long ago we couldn’t see to save our cinema-curious souls.

S.O.S. Tidal Wave

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1939 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 62 min. / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Ralph Byrd, George Barbier, Kay Sutton, Frank Jenks, Marc Lawrence, Dorothy Lee, Oscar O’Shea, Mickey Kuhn, Ferris Taylor, Don ‘Red’ Barry, Raymond Bailey.

Cinematography: Jack A. Marta

Film Editor: Ernest Nims

Musical Director: Cy Feuer

Written by Gordon Kahn, Stanley Rauh, Maxwell Shane, story by James Webb

Produced by Armand Schaefer

Directed by John H. Auer

If Republic wasn’t
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Lumière Festival: Bertrand Tavernier on His Lifelong Love of Classic Westerns

Lumière Festival: Bertrand Tavernier on His Lifelong Love of Classic Westerns
This year’s 9th Lumière Festival includes a section dedicated to classic American Westerns, selected by French helmer Bertrand Tavernier (“The French Minister”), who is also curating a collection of books dedicated to the genre, published by Actes Sud.

The fourteen films to be screened span the period between 1943 and 1962, including titles such as William A. Wellman’s “The Ox-Bow Incident” (1943), John Ford’s “My Darling Clementine” (1946), Howard Hawks’ “Red River” (1948), Delmer Daves’ “Broken Arrow” (1950), King Vidor’s “Man Without a Star” (1955) and John Ford’s “The Man who Shot Liberty Valance” (1962).

Tavernier will personally present each film. He has been a fan of American Westerns since he was a teenager and became an avid reader of Western novels as soon as he learned how to read English, in his early twenties.

Through this section and also a book collection published by Actes Sud, Tavernier is paying his own personal tribute to this quintessentially American genre. He is
See full article at Variety - Film News »

For The Postseason: Joe E. Brown As Alibi Ike

If you’re a baseball fan, particularly if you’re a Dodgers, Astros, Cubs or Yankees fan, the real baseball season started this past Friday with the inauguration of the American and National League Championship Series. I’m a Dodgers fan, which means I’m among that group who, arguably, have gone the longest without the satisfaction/excitement/nail-biting terror of seeing their team in the World Series, the next step for whoever wins in the Nlcs. The Dodgers last appeared in the World Series in 1988, capping a memorable run with a championship by beating the Oakland A’s. That was 29 years ago. The Cubs are the reigning Mlb champions, having won last year’s World Series after a 107-year drought. And the Yankees, a mainstay of the World Series around the turn of this century, last appeared in an October championship series in 2009.

The only team to come close
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Jeff Bridges interview: Kingsman: The Golden Circle, Iron Man, Starman, westerns

Duncan Bowles Sep 20, 2017

Jeff Bridges chats to us about movies, Kingsman, westerns, Iron Man and more...

When preparing for an interview it can often be a double edged sword if you choose to look at other peoples’ work. Sometimes you read an interview and the answers can look frighteningly short, so panic might set in that perhaps that person isn’t very chatty, or doesn’t like doing them (though often publications just choose to use highlights), but I have to say that with Jeff Bridges, I’m glad I’d read Celia Walden’s talk with him for the Telegraph first.

I wouldn’t usually reference what I’d read in an introduction, but once you know you’re going to be sat in a room with Jeff Bridges, alone, for fifteen minutes, you need as much preparation as possible – he is, after all, a cinematic legend who needs no introduction.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Law and Jake Wade

Many of MGM’s productions were scraping bottom in 1958, yet the studio found one more acceptable western vehicle for their last big star still on contract. Only-slightly corrupt marshal Robert Taylor edges toward a showdown with the thoroughly corrupt Richard Widmark in an economy item given impressive locations and the sound direction of John Sturges.

The Law and Jake Wade

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1958 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 86 min. / Street Date September 12, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Robert Taylor, Richard Widmark, Patricia Owens, Robert Middleton, Henry Silva, DeForest Kelley, Henry Silva, Burt Douglas, Eddie Firestone.

Cinematography: Robert Surtees

Film Editor: Ferris Webster

Written by William Bowers from a novel by Marvin H. Albert

Produced by William B. Hawks

Directed by John Sturges

As the 1950s wore down, MGM was finding it more difficult to properly use its last remaining big-ticket stars on the steady payroll, Cyd Charisse and Robert Taylor. Cyd
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman’ Actor, Dies at 91

Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman’ Actor, Dies at 91
Richard Anderson, who simultaneously played Oscar Goldman, leader of secret government agent the Osi, on both “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman” after a long career as a supporting actor in film and TV, died on Thursday in his Beverly Hills home. He was 91.

Anderson famously intoned the words heard in voiceover in the opening credits of “The Six Million Dollar Man”: “Gentlemen, we can rebuild him. We have the technology. We have the capability to make the world’s first bionic man. Steve Austin will be that man. Better than he was before. Better … stronger … faster.”

Anderson was one of a handful of actors who’ve played the same character simultaneously on more than one series on an ongoing basis; some actors in the “Law & Order” franchise made occasional or special appearances on another “Law & Order” series, but were not seen regularly on more than one series.

Related
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sam Shepard Remembered by ‘The Right Stuff’ Director Philip Kaufman: Half Jackrabbit, Best Chili Maker

Sam Shepard Remembered by ‘The Right Stuff’ Director Philip Kaufman: Half Jackrabbit, Best Chili Maker
Writer-director Philip Kaufman formed a lasting friendship with Sam Shepard when they worked together on “The Right Stuff,” the 1983 film for which Shepard was nominated for an Academy Award.

I first met Sam Shepard at a poetry reading when he was living here in the Bay Area. I was preparing “The Right Stuff” around then, and trying like hell to find someone who could play Chuck Yeager. Sam got up and read some of his poetry and my wife Rose said, “That’s your guy.” I said, “Where?” Yeager was a compact man, 5’7” or something, and here Sam was, this gangly guy. But I started listening and I got what she meant. Sam had this sense of honesty about him, and a sense of presence. He was a Gary Cooper kind of guy, even though I think Sam didn’t want to be Gary Cooper; he wanted to be Chester [the character played by Dennis Weaver] in “Gunsmoke,” the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Actor and Playwright Sam Shepard Dead at 73

Sam Shepard, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and Oscar-nominated actor, died Sunday at the age of 73. The winner of 13 Obie Awards, Shepard won his first six for plays he penned between 1966 and 1968. After his success on the off-Broadway stage, Shepard segued to screenwriting with credits on films like Michelangelo Antonioni’s Zabriske Point before turning to acting. Besides his Oscar-nominated turn as Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff, Shepard also acted in Mud, Black Hawk Down, The Notebook, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, August: Osage County. Shepard suffered from Als and was 73.

From The New York Times:

Sam Shepard, whose hallucinatory plays redefined the landscape of the American West and its inhabitants, died on Thursday at his home in Kentucky of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, a spokesman for the Shepard family announced on Monday. He was 73. Possessed of a stoically
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

You Only Live Once

Fritz Lang continues his take-no-prisoners indictment of America’s curious relationship with crime; this time he presents the thesis that an innocent man can be a pawn in cosmic game of injustice. Three-time loser Henry Fonda, the glummest actor in ’30s films, doesn’t mean to rob or kill, but gosh darn it, They Made Him a Criminal. Those considerations aside, it’s a wonderful cinematic achievement, made all the better by a decent digital restoration.

You Only Live Once

Blu-ray

ClassicFlix

1937 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 86 min. / Street Date July 25, 2017 / 29.98

Starring: Sylvia Sidney, Henry Fonda, Barton MacLane, Jean Dixon,

William Gargan, Jerome Cowan, Charles ‘Chic’ Sale, Margaret Hamilton, Warren Hymer,

Guinn ‘Big Boy’ Williams, Ward Bond, Jack Carson, Jonathan Hale

Cinematography: Leon Shamroy

Art Direction: Alexander Toluboff

Film Editor: Daniel Mandell

Original Music: Hugo Friedhofer

Written by Graham Baker and Gene Towne

Produced by Walter Wanger

Directed by Fritz Lang
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century
Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance
'Under the Volcano' screening: John Huston's 'quality' comeback featuring daring Albert Finney tour de force As part of its John Huston film series, the UCLA Film & Television Archive will be presenting the 1984 drama Under the Volcano, starring Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, and Anthony Andrews, on July 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Billy Wilder Theater in the Los Angeles suburb of Westwood. Jacqueline Bisset is expected to be in attendance. Huston was 77, and suffering from emphysema for several years, when he returned to Mexico – the setting of both The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Night of the Iguana – to direct 28-year-old newcomer Guy Gallo's adaptation of English poet and novelist Malcolm Lowry's 1947 semi-autobiographical novel Under the Volcano, which until then had reportedly defied the screenwriting abilities of numerous professionals. Appropriately set on the Day of the Dead – 1938 – in the fictitious Mexican town of Quauhnahuac (the fact that it sounds like Cuernavaca
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

1 of the Greatest Actors of the Studio Era Has His TCM Month

1 of the Greatest Actors of the Studio Era Has His TCM Month
Ronald Colman: Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month in two major 1930s classics Updated: Turner Classic Movies' July 2017 Star of the Month is Ronald Colman, one of the finest performers of the studio era. On Thursday night, TCM presented five Colman star vehicles that should be popping up again in the not-too-distant future: A Tale of Two Cities, The Prisoner of Zenda, Kismet, Lucky Partners, and My Life with Caroline. The first two movies are among not only Colman's best, but also among Hollywood's best during its so-called Golden Age. Based on Charles Dickens' classic novel, Jack Conway's Academy Award-nominated A Tale of Two Cities (1936) is a rare Hollywood production indeed: it manages to effectively condense its sprawling source, it boasts first-rate production values, and it features a phenomenal central performance. Ah, it also shows its star without his trademark mustache – about as famous at the time as Clark Gable's. Perhaps
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Jackie Chan's Oddest Fight, Comic Book Artist Jack Kirby, And More -- The Lrm Weekend

  By David Kozlowski   |   7 July 2017

Welcome to Issue #3 of The Lrm Weekend, a weekly column highlighting cool and unique videos about film, TV, comics, Star Wars, Marvel, DC, animation, and anime. We also want to hear from you, our awesome Lrm community! Share your favorite videos to: @LRM_Weekend and we'll post your Tweets below!

Last Issue: 6.30.17

Why do we love superheroes, martial arts, fantasy, and sci-fi? The big fight scenes, of course. Every week we'll bring you an epic brawl from the recent or distant past -- we want to hear from you, share your favorite fights with us!

Jackie Chan's The Legend of Drunken Master (1994) Bonus: Jackie Chan Talks About Bringing Film To America

The original Chinese language movie poster from 1978!

What Is It?

Drunken Master II is a 1994 Hong Kong kung fu film directed by Lau Kar-leung and Jackie Chan, who stars as Chinese folk hero, Wong Fei-hung.
See full article at LRM Online »

'Hickok': Film Review

'Hickok': Film Review
The innate superiority of the Hemsworth family gene pool is demonstrated by Timothy Woodward Jr.’s low-budget oater in which Luke, older brother to Chris and Liam, plays Wild Bill Hickok. A perfectly serviceable Western featuring a comfortingly familiar storyline, Hickok will tide genre fans over until more substantial offerings come along.

Following in the footsteps of such actors as Gary Cooper, Jeff Bridges and Sam Elliott, among many others, the burly Hemsworth proves more than credible with his portrayal of the iconic gunslinger, the sort of archetypal Western character who doesn’t bother to remove his boots while taking a bath....
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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