IMDb > Gary Cooper > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDesk
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDesk
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

News for
Gary Cooper (I) More at IMDbPro »

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 32 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Sam Shepard Remembered by ‘The Right Stuff’ Director Philip Kaufman: Half Jackrabbit, Best Chili Maker

1 August 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Writer-director Philip Kaufman formed a lasting friendship with Sam Shepard when they worked together on “The Right Stuff,” the 1983 film for which Shepard was nominated for an Academy Award.

I first met Sam Shepard at a poetry reading when he was living here in the Bay Area. I was preparing “The Right Stuff” around then, and trying like hell to find someone who could play Chuck Yeager. Sam got up and read some of his poetry and my wife Rose said, “That’s your guy.” I said, “Where?” Yeager was a compact man, 5’7” or something, and here Sam was, this gangly guy. But I started listening and I got what she meant. Sam had this sense of honesty about him, and a sense of presence. He was a Gary Cooper kind of guy, even though I think Sam didn’t want to be Gary Cooper; he wanted to be Chester [the character played by Dennis Weaver] in “Gunsmoke,” the »

- Philip Kaufman

Permalink | Report a problem


Actor and Playwright Sam Shepard Dead at 73

31 July 2017 3:20 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Sam Shepard, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and Oscar-nominated actor, died Sunday at the age of 73. The winner of 13 Obie Awards, Shepard won his first six for plays he penned between 1966 and 1968. After his success on the off-Broadway stage, Shepard segued to screenwriting with credits on films like Michelangelo Antonioni’s Zabriske Point before turning to acting. Besides his Oscar-nominated turn as Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff, Shepard also acted in MudBlack Hawk DownThe NotebookThe Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert FordAugust: Osage County. Shepard suffered from Als and was 73.

From The New York Times:

Sam Shepard, whose hallucinatory plays redefined the landscape of the American West and its inhabitants, died on Thursday at his home in Kentucky of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, a spokesman for the Shepard family announced on Monday. He was 73. Possessed of a stoically »

- Tom Stockman

Permalink | Report a problem


You Only Live Once

31 July 2017 9:20 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Fritz Lang continues his take-no-prisoners indictment of America’s curious relationship with crime; this time he presents the thesis that an innocent man can be a pawn in cosmic game of injustice. Three-time loser Henry Fonda, the glummest actor in ’30s films, doesn’t mean to rob or kill, but gosh darn it, They Made Him a Criminal. Those considerations aside, it’s a wonderful cinematic achievement, made all the better by a decent digital restoration.

You Only Live Once

Blu-ray

ClassicFlix

1937 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 86 min. / Street Date July 25, 2017 / 29.98

Starring: Sylvia Sidney, Henry Fonda, Barton MacLane, Jean Dixon,

William Gargan, Jerome Cowan, Charles ‘Chic’ Sale, Margaret Hamilton, Warren Hymer,

Guinn ‘Big Boy’ Williams, Ward Bond, Jack Carson, Jonathan Hale

Cinematography: Leon Shamroy

Art Direction: Alexander Toluboff

Film Editor: Daniel Mandell

Original Music: Hugo Friedhofer

Written by Graham Baker and Gene Towne

Produced by Walter Wanger

Directed by Fritz Lang »

- Glenn Erickson

Permalink | Report a problem


From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

28 July 2017 1:01 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance

21 July 2017 4:01 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Under the Volcano' screening: John Huston's 'quality' comeback featuring daring Albert Finney tour de force As part of its John Huston film series, the UCLA Film & Television Archive will be presenting the 1984 drama Under the Volcano, starring Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, and Anthony Andrews, on July 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Billy Wilder Theater in the Los Angeles suburb of Westwood. Jacqueline Bisset is expected to be in attendance. Huston was 77, and suffering from emphysema for several years, when he returned to Mexico – the setting of both The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Night of the Iguana – to direct 28-year-old newcomer Guy Gallo's adaptation of English poet and novelist Malcolm Lowry's 1947 semi-autobiographical novel Under the Volcano, which until then had reportedly defied the screenwriting abilities of numerous professionals. Appropriately set on the Day of the Dead – 1938 – in the fictitious Mexican town of Quauhnahuac (the fact that it sounds like Cuernavaca »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


1 of the Greatest Actors of the Studio Era Has His TCM Month

21 July 2017 1:40 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ronald Colman: Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month in two major 1930s classics Updated: Turner Classic Movies' July 2017 Star of the Month is Ronald Colman, one of the finest performers of the studio era. On Thursday night, TCM presented five Colman star vehicles that should be popping up again in the not-too-distant future: A Tale of Two Cities, The Prisoner of Zenda, Kismet, Lucky Partners, and My Life with Caroline. The first two movies are among not only Colman's best, but also among Hollywood's best during its so-called Golden Age. Based on Charles Dickens' classic novel, Jack Conway's Academy Award-nominated A Tale of Two Cities (1936) is a rare Hollywood production indeed: it manages to effectively condense its sprawling source, it boasts first-rate production values, and it features a phenomenal central performance. Ah, it also shows its star without his trademark mustache – about as famous at the time as Clark Gable's. Perhaps »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Jackie Chan's Oddest Fight, Comic Book Artist Jack Kirby, And More -- The Lrm Weekend

7 July 2017 1:30 PM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

  By David Kozlowski   |   7 July 2017

Welcome to Issue #3 of The Lrm Weekend, a weekly column highlighting cool and unique videos about film, TV, comics, Star Wars, Marvel, DC, animation, and anime. We also want to hear from you, our awesome Lrm community! Share your favorite videos to: @LRM_Weekend and we'll post your Tweets below!

Last Issue: 6.30.17

Why do we love superheroes, martial arts, fantasy, and sci-fi? The big fight scenes, of course. Every week we'll bring you an epic brawl from the recent or distant past -- we want to hear from you, share your favorite fights with us!

Jackie Chan's The Legend of Drunken Master (1994) Bonus: Jackie Chan Talks About Bringing Film To America

The original Chinese language movie poster from 1978!

What Is It?

Drunken Master II is a 1994 Hong Kong kung fu film directed by Lau Kar-leung and Jackie Chan, who stars as Chinese folk hero, Wong Fei-hung. »

- David Kozlowski

Permalink | Report a problem


'Hickok': Film Review

7 July 2017 9:32 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The innate superiority of the Hemsworth family gene pool is demonstrated by Timothy Woodward Jr.’s low-budget oater in which Luke, older brother to Chris and Liam, plays Wild Bill Hickok. A perfectly serviceable Western featuring a comfortingly familiar storyline, Hickok will tide genre fans over until more substantial offerings come along.

Following in the footsteps of such actors as Gary Cooper, Jeff Bridges and Sam Elliott, among many others, the burly Hemsworth proves more than credible with his portrayal of the iconic gunslinger, the sort of archetypal Western character who doesn’t bother to remove his boots while taking a bath. »

- Frank Scheck

Permalink | Report a problem


Authorized Lou Gehrig Biopic ‘The Luckiest Man’ in Development

21 June 2017 5:33 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

An authorized biopic of iconic baseball player Lou Gehrig was announced Wednesday, the 78th anniversary of Gehrig’s retirement from the New York Yankees.

The baseball team has given its endorsement to the new project “The Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth.” The film will be directed by Jay Russell (“My Dog Skip” “Ladder 49”) and based on the biography “Luckiest Man” by Jonathan Eig, with a screenplay adaptation by Dan Kay.

The movie will focus on Gehrig’s playing career from 1923 to 1939, when it was cut short by Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and his relationship with his wife Eleanor. Gehrig died in 1941 and his life was recounted in 1942’s “Pride of the Yankees,” which starred Gary Cooper and received 11 Oscar nominations.

The title is taken from a speech Gehrig gave at Yankee Stadium two weeks after his retirement. The speech began, “Fans, for the past two weeks, you’ve been reading about a bad break. Today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth. I have been in ballparks for 17 years and have never received anything but kindness and encouragement from you fans.”

Producers are Branded Entertainment’s Michael Uslan and David Uslan, Kingsway Productions’ Robert Molloy and Conglomerate Media’s Armando Gutierrez. Barrie Osborne and Jeff Steen will serve as executive producers. Principal casting will begin this month.

“Lou Gehrig is an iconic character, not just in baseball, but as a true American hero, a man who faced his intense, personal battles with quiet bravery,” Russell said. “While Gehrig’s story has previously been told in the beloved ‘Pride of the Yankees’, this will be a new depiction with a more contemporary style and approach.”

David Uslan said, “This is the story of how a shy, quiet man, at the moment in life that tests him to the absolute extreme, can step up to the plate and deliver extemporaneously, and from the heart, arguably one of the greatest speeches in American history. It can’t help but rekindle our belief in the best of humanity during today’s polarizing and dispirited times.”

Michael and David Uslan are represented by Wme and Manatt Phelps & Phillips. Russell is represented by Apa, Zero Gravity Management and Gang, Tyre, Ramer, and Brown. Kay is represented by Apa, Circle of Confusion and Myman, Greenspan, Fineman, Fox, Rosenberg & Light. Osborne is represented by Gersh and Stankevich Law. The news was first reported by Deadline Hollywood. »

- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


Tom Cruise and ‘The Mummy’: Why This May Be the Weirdest Movie Choice of His Career

8 June 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In August 1983, Ronald Reagan was president, “Every Breath You Take” by The Police was in the middle of an eight-week run as the #1 single, Ivanka Trump wasn’t quite two years old, and few people were aware of the Church of Scientology. And “Risky Business,” the first movie to star Tom Cruise, became a surprise hit.

34 years later, Cruise is at a different kind of crossroads at the box office. He’s been charged with rebooting Universal’s Mummy franchise, which will launch the studio’s “Dark Universe” story world. And while “The Mummy” has already opened strongly in its first date (South Korea), projections here are considerably less kind. Reviews have ranged from disappointing to incendiary, and “Wonder Woman” is expected to soundly beat the film in its opening weekend.

Read More: Review: ‘The Mummy’ Is The Worst Tom Cruise Movie Ever

While “The Mummy” won’t be a career highlight, »

- Tom Brueggemann

Permalink | Report a problem


How Carrie Coon Quietly Became TV's Most Valuable Player of 2017

3 June 2017 7:18 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

If you've been watching television for the last few months, you have probably seen Carrie Coon cry. This is not unusual, considering that, throughout her tenure on the three seasons of The Leftovers, HBO's bleak, brilliant drama has required the actress to turn on the waterworks numerous times. Also, she's an excellent crier, the kind who can run the scales from single-silent-tear-running-down-a-cheek to full-out crumbling, crinkle-faced ugly sobbing. A wise showrunner knows that when you've got someone on your team who can bring it like that on a series about trauma and tragedy, »

Permalink | Report a problem


TCM goes to war on Memorial Day: But thorny issues mostly avoided

29 May 2017 9:26 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Submarine movie evening: Underwater war waged in TCM's Memorial Day films In the U.S., Turner Classic Movies has gone all red, white, and blue this 2017 Memorial Day weekend, presenting a few dozen Hollywood movies set during some of the numerous wars in which the U.S. has been involved around the globe during the last century or so. On Memorial Day proper, TCM is offering a submarine movie evening. More on that further below. But first it's good to remember that although war has, to put it mildly, serious consequences for all involved, it can be particularly brutal on civilians – whether male or female; young or old; saintly or devilish; no matter the nationality, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other label used in order to, figuratively or literally, split apart human beings. Just this past Sunday, the Pentagon chief announced that civilian deaths should be anticipated as “a »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Their Western Moment: A Conversation with Valeska Grisebach

27 May 2017 5:28 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

For those with a sudden interest in new German cinema thanks to last year’s Toni Erdmann, the Cannes Film Festival has again selected another powerful, deeply human and intricately political drama in Valeska Grisebach’s terrific Western. Like Maren Ade, with whom she has collaborated, Grisebach has made two films—the lovely graduation short feature Be My Star (2001) and Longing (2006), a small town tale of a fireman’s love life—with long pauses in between. Western comes more than a decade after her first proper feature, and it confirms that the director is as talented as ever.The setting is a German worker camp in the modern day Bulgarian countryside, and, as as the title daringly states, this is indeed a "western." The isolated Germans are the encroaching (economic) colonizers—“we come here to work,” they say, flush with money and a reputation dating from the Second World War »

Permalink | Report a problem


Robert Pattinson Gives a Career-Best Performance in the Safdie Brothers’ ‘Good Time’ — Cannes 2017 Review

25 May 2017 1:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In the opening minutes of Josh and Benny Safdie’s “Good Time,” Robert Pattinson bursts into the room and it’s clear he’s trying something different. With his black hair tousled above an angry stare and a silvery earring peering out from one side, he’s a scruffy, irrepressible ball of fury, eager to fix a problem and on the verge of making it worse. He’s abrasive, clumsy and a little bit fearsome. In other words: He’s in a Safdie brothers movie.

Anyone familiar with the sibling directors from their dreary NYC junkie drama “Heaven Knows What” or gritty urban comedy “Daddy Longlegs” knows how the brothers have assembled a universe of grimy characters enmeshed in bizarre, dangerous circumstances that can seem at once naturalistic and surreal. With “Good Time,” they transform that focus into a Kafkaesque heist movie, populated by maniacal characters careening through Queens on »

- Eric Kohn

Permalink | Report a problem


Marlene Dietrich Retrospective Screening at the Metrograph in NYC

24 May 2017 2:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Marlene Dietrich in “Shanghai Express”: mptvimages.com/IMDb

If you’re a fan of actress, camp icon, and anti-fascist Marlene Dietrich or want to learn more about her, you’re in luck. The Metrograph theater in New York City is hosting “Marlene,” a retrospective featuring 19 of Dietrich’s films. The festivities kicked off May 23 and will continue until July 8.

Marie Magdalene “Marlene” Dietrich was born in Berlin in 1901. Dietrich began her career as a vaudeville performer in Weimar Germany. She moved to Hollywood and eventually became a revered film actress, “bisexual sex symbol, willful camp icon, [and] paragon of feminine glamour” — “comfortable in top hat and tails, ballgown, or gorilla suit.” But the actress did not forget about what was happening back home in Germany; Dietrich became involved in the fight against fascism during WWII. She “used her likeness to fundraise for Jewish refugees escaping Nazi Germany and performed on Uso tours, earning her the Metal of Freedom and Légion d’honneur by the French government,” the press release details. Dietrich died in 1992 at the age of 90.

The “Marlene” retrospective will feature Dietrich’s seven films with director Josef von Sternberg: “The Blue Angel,” “Morocco,” “Blonde Venus,” “Dishonored,” “Shanghai Express,” “The Devil Is A Woman,” and “The Scarlet Empress.” The actress’ collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock (“Stage Fright”), Orson Welles (“Touch of Evil”), and Billy Wilder (“A Foreign Affair”) are among the other films screening at the Metrograph. A documentary about Dietrich, Maximilian Schell’s “Marlene,” will also screen. All of the films, besides “Marlene,” will be shown in 35mm.

Head over to The Metrograph’s site for showtimes and more information. The featured films and their synopses are below, courtesy of the Metrograph.

Angel

1937 / 91min / 35mm

Director: Ernst Lubitsch

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall, Melvyn Douglas

While English statesman Herbert Marshall worries over international affairs, his glamorous wife (Dietrich) concerns herself with, well, international affairs, beginning a tryst with a dashing stranger (Melvyn Douglas) who she only allows to know her as “Angel.” Dietrich’s last film on her Paramount contract is a spry, surprising love triangle, one of the least-known of Lubitsch’s essential works from his Midas touch period.

Blonde Venus

1932 / 93min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall, Cary Grant

A.k.a “The One with the Gorilla Suit,” which Dietrich dons to perform her big number “Hot Voodoo.” It’s all for a good cause: she’s an ex-nightclub chanteuse who’s gone back to work to pay for husband Herbert Marshall’s radium poisoning treatments, though she later allows herself to become the plaything of Cary Grant’s dashing young millionaire, earning only contempt for her sacrifice.

Der Blaue Engel

1930 / 106min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings, Kurt Gerron, Rosa Valetti

Mild-mannered, uptight schoolteacher Emil Jannings lives a faultlessly law-abiding, by-the-book existence, but it’s all over when he gets a glimpse of Dietrich’s nightclub chanteuse Lola-Lola, and is immediately ready to ruin himself for her amusement. The first collaboration between Dietrich and von Sternberg made her an international star, and linked her forever to her seductive, world-weary delivery of the song “Falling in Love Again.” We’re showing the German-language version, preceded by a four-minute-long Dietrich screen test.

Desire

1936 / 95min / 35mm

Director: Frank Borzage

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, John Halliday, William Frawley

Dietrich and Gary Cooper reunite in this delightful urbane comedy by Borzage, a master of romantic delirium, here working somewhat after the style of producer Ernst Lubitsch. La Dietrich’s stylish jewel thief stashes a clutch of pearls in the pocket of an upstanding American businessman, and while trying to get back the goods she can’t help but notice the big lug isn’t half bad-looking. An excuse to recall the following lines from the 1936 Times review: “Lubitsch, the Gay Emancipator, has freed Dietrich from von Sternberg’s artistic bondage.” Those were the days.

Destry Rides Again

1939 / 94min / 35mm

Director: George Marshall

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, James Stewart, Mischa Auer, Charles Winninger

Jimmy Stewart, still in his rangy, impossibly-good-looking phase, is a marshal who sets out to clean up the wide-open town of Bottleneck without firing a shot in this charming Western musical comedy. The local roughnecks present him one kind of challenge; Dietrich’s saloon singer Frenchy, belting out her rowdy standard “The Boys in the Back Room,” quite another.

The Devil Is A Woman

1935 / 80min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Lionel Atwill, Edward Everett Horton

Dietrich and von Sternberg’s final collaboration, and an apotheosis of sorts. In Spain in the early years of the 20th century, Lionel Atwill’s loyal suitor Pasqualito and the revolutionary Cesar Romero are teased into a frenzy by legendary coquette Concha (Guess who?). The coolly scrolling camera and baroque compositions are courtesy of an uncredited Lucien Ballard and Von Sternberg himself, doing double duty as cinematographer.

Dishonored

1931 / 91min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Victor McLaglen

Dietrich plays X-27, a Mata Hari-esque spy for the Austrian Secret Service tasked with using a bevy of costume changes (Russian peasant, feathered helmet, leather jumpsuit) to gather information on the Russians during World War I. Outrageous plotting, high chiaroscuro style, and the star’s earthy sensuality mark this unforgettable pre-code treasure, beloved by Godard and Fassbinder both. Says Victor McLaglen: “the more you cheat and the more you lie, the more exciting you become.”

A Foreign Affair

1948 / 116min / 35mm

Director: Billy Wilder

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Jean Arthur, John Lund, Millard Mitchell

Against the backdrop of a ruined postwar Berlin, another conflict is just heating up, as Dietrich’s cabaret singer with rumored Nazi ties vies with Jean Arthur’s Iowa congresswoman-on-a-fact-finding-mission for the affection of American officer John Lund. Wilder’s penultimate collaboration with co-writer Charles Brackett is a black comic delight full of crackling, piquant dialogue, and Dietrich’s knowing slow-burn has never been better.

Judgment At Nuremberg

1961 / 186min / 35mm

Director: Stanley Kramer

Cast: Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Marlene Dietrich, Maximilian Schell, Judy Garland, Montgomery Clift, William Shatner

Dietrich’s last truly substantial screen appearance came as part of the ensemble for Kramer’s courtroom drama, playing the widow of a German general executed by the Allies who’s befriended by investigating judge Spencer Tracy in this fictionalized retelling of the events of a 1947 military tribunal addressing war crimes by civilians under the Third Reich. Rounding out the all-star cast are Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Judy Garland, William Shatner, and Maximilian Schell, who would win the Academy Award for Best Actor, and later directed a portrait of Dietrich.

The Lady Is Willing

1942 / 92min / 35mm

Director: Mitchell Leisen

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Fred MacMurray, Aline MacMahon, Stanley Ridges

Leisen, considered a comic talent on-par with Lubitsch during the screwball era, lends characteristic sparkle to this mid-career attempt at reconfiguring Dietrich’s very 1930s star persona to fit the needs of the 1940s women’s picture; here she plays a glamor-gal diva whose life changes when she discovers a baby on Eighth Avenue and decides to adopt, passing through melodramatic coincidences and a vale of tears before falling into the arms of Fred MacMurray.

Lola

1981 / 113min / 35mm

Director: Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Cast: Barbara Sukowa, Armin Mueller-stahl, Mario Adorf, Matthias Fuchs

Dietrich had for all purposes retired from the screen by the time that Fassbinder began his frontal assault on West German popular culture, but her image and her unlikely combination of cool irony and torrid emotion left a profound mark on his films. Lola, the candy-colored, late-1950s-set capstone of his “Brd Trilogy” in particular draws heavily from The Blue Angel, with bordello singer Barbara Sukowa torn between Mario Adorf’s sugar daddy and Armin Mueller-Stahl’s incoming building commissioner in boomtown Coburg.

Marlene

1984 / 94min / Digital

Director: Maximilian Schell

More than twenty years after Schell had co-starred with Dietrich in Judgment at Nuremberg, during which period she’d retired to a life of very private seclusion, he tried to get her to participate in a documentary about her life. She finally gave in — sort of. Dietrich offered only her memories and her famous voice, refusing to appear on camera, but necessity became a boon to the resulting film, a sort of guided tour of Dietrich’s life and work, which simultaneously reveals much and deepens her mystery.

Morocco

1930 / 92min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, Adolphe Menjou

After The Blue Angel, shot in Germany, was a hit, von Sternberg was given full run of the Paramount backlot, where he would conjure up all manner of exotic destinations out of thin air. First stop: North Africa, where French legionnaire Gary Cooper competes with sugar daddy Adolphe Menjou for the favors of Dietrich’s cabaret star Amy Jolly, who in one scene famously rocks a men’s tailcoat and plants a smooch on a female fan.

Rancho Notorious

1952 / 89min / 35mm

Director: Fritz Lang

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Arthur Kennedy, Mel Ferrer, William Frawley

Teutons Lang and Dietrich team up in a Technicolor wild west of deliberate, garish artifice in this singularly claustrophobic oater, in which a revenge-mad Burt Kennedy goes looking for his fiancée’s killers at a hideaway inn run by Dietrich, and discovers dangerous, unbidden desires instead. As the chant of the film’s recurring, persecutorial Brechtian ballad goes: “Hate, murder, and revenge.”

The Scarlet Empress

1934 / 104min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, John Lodge, Sam Jaffe, Louise Dresser

Have ever a screen persona and a historical personage found such a hand-in-glove-fit as did Dietrich and Empress Catherine the Great of Russia? While the Motion Picture Production Code was preparing to chasten American movies, Dietrich and von Sternberg got together to throw one last lavish S & M orgy, a flamboyant film of 18th century palace intrigues and ludicrously lapidary décor.

Shanghai Express

1932 / 82min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Clive Brook, Anna May Wong

“It took more than one man to change my name to Shanghai Lily,” proclaims Marlene Dietrich with the disdain of an empress, though in fact she’s a high-class courtesan, re-encountering former lover Clive Brook on an express train rolling through civil war-wracked China. The fourth of Dietrich and von Sternberg’s collaborations is a riot of delirious chinoiserie artifice and sculpted shadowplay — Dietrich’s co-star Anna May Wong was never again shot so caressingly.

The Song Of Songs

1933 / 90min / 35mm

Director: Rouben Mamoulian

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Brian Aherne, Lionel Atwill

So often the instrument of corruption, Mamoulian’s film allows Dietrich to be the corrupted one, playing a country girl, Lily, who comes to big-city Berlin and quickly becomes the model and muse of sculptor Brian Aherne. Lionel Atwill’s preening decadent Baron von Merzbach admires Lily’s nude form in marble, and decides to bring the original home with him, where she slips into the role of the cynical sophisticate, though her heart remains with the artist.

Stage Fright

1950 / 110min / 35mm

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Jane Wyman, Michael Wilding, Richard Todd, Alastair Sim

Hitchcock’s last film in his native England until 1972’s Frenzy is an audaciously-structured thriller, making use of an extended flashback and a whiplash narrative about-face. Acting student Jane Wyman tries to save beau Robert Todd from taking the fall for a murder committed by stage star Dietrich, who shows her hypnotic charm in a show-stopper performance of “I’m the Laziest Gal in Town.”

Touch Of Evil

1958 / 95min / 35mm

Director: Orson Welles

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Orson Welles

It’s not the size of the part, but what you do with it. Playing a brothel keeper in a seedy border town in Welles’s magnificently baroque late noir, Dietrich only has a clutch of lines, but they’re the ones you remember, whether her famous requiem for crooked cop Hank Quinlan, or her reading of his “fortune”: “Your future’s all used up.” Bold and self-evidently brilliant, you could use Touch of Evil to explain the concept of great cinema to a visiting Martian.

Marlene Dietrich Retrospective Screening at the Metrograph in NYC was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2017. Europe's New Frontier—Valeska Grisebach's "Western"

22 May 2017 5:48 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Meinhard Neumann and Syuleyman Alilov Letifov.For those with a sudden interest in new German cinema thanks to last year’s Toni Erdmann, the Cannes Film Festival has again selected another powerful, deeply human and intricately political drama in Valeska Grisebach’s terrific Western. Like Maren Ade, with whom she has collaborated, Grisebach has made two films—the lovely graduation short feature Be My Star (2001) and Longing (2006), a small town tale of a fireman’s love life—with long pauses in between. Western comes more than a decade after her first proper feature, and it confirms the director as talented as ever.The setting is a German worker camp in the modern day Bulgarian countryside, and, as as the title daringly states, this is indeed a "western." The isolated Germans are the encroaching (economic) colonizers—“we come here to work,” they say, flush with money and a reputation dating from »

Permalink | Report a problem


A Farewell to Arms (1957)

29 April 2017 10:54 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

This remake of a pre-Code classic adds amazing European locations, glorious Technicolor and entire armies on the move, yet doesn’t improve on the original. Producer David O. Selznick secured Rock Hudson to play opposite Jennifer Jones, but the chemistry is lacking. Why did the man spend twenty years trying to top Gone With the Wind?

A Farewell to Arms

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1957 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 152 min. / Street Date April 18, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Jennifer Jones, Rock Hudson, Vittorio De Sica, Mercedes McCambridgeElaine Stritch.

Cinematography: Oswald Morris, Piero Portalupi

Production Designer: Alfred Junge

Art Direction: Mario Garbuglia

Film Editors: John M. Foley, Gerard J. Wilson

Original Music: Mario Nascimbene

Written by Ben Hecht from a play by Laurence Stallings from a novel by Ernest Hemingway

Produced by David O. Selznick

Directed by Charles Vidor

 

What happens when a major Hollywood producer thinks he has all the answers? »

- Glenn Erickson

Permalink | Report a problem


"Tear Down the Fences": Watching Capra in the Age of Trump

4 April 2017 4:02 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The retrospective Frank Capra, The American Dreamer is showing April 10 - May 31, 2017 in the United Kingdom.Frank CapraFrank Capra has fallen badly out of fashion in recent decades. While still well-known for the extraordinary Depression-era purple patch that produced It Happened One Night (1934), Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), the critics have rarely been kind. His work is routinely derided as “Capra-corn” for its perceived sentimentality and “fairy tale” idealism while the man himself is written off in favour of contemporaries Howard Hawks, Preston Sturges and Ernst Lubitsch.Elliot Stein, writing in Sight & Sound in 1972, attacked Capra’s “fantasies of good will, which at no point conflict with middle-class American status quo values”, arguing that his “shrewdly commercial manipulative tracts” consist of little more than “philistine-populist notions and greeting-card sentiments”. Pauline Kael found him “softheaded,” Derek Malcolm a huckster hawking “cosily absurd fables.” To an extent, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Wings Screening With Live Music by the Prima Vista Quartet at Webster University April 14th

3 April 2017 7:34 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“Hello Yank, welcome to a very merry little war. And now how about a wee drop for the King and Uncle Sam?”

The 1927 silent classic Wings will screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood) April 14th at 7:30pm. Wings will be accompanied by an original score by the Prima Vista Quartet. Tickets are $10.00

Ticket information can be found Here

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2844369

In 1927, the first Best Picture Oscar went to Wings, a thrilling silent WW1 drama from director William S. Wellman. Wings told the story of poor boy Jack (Charles Rogers) and rich boy David (Richard Arlen) who are in love with the same woman, which causes the two to become bitter enemies. When WW1 breaks out the two are thrown together and quickly become friends, although David is too nice to let Jack know that the girl back home doesn’t love him. Clara Bow »

- Tom Stockman

Permalink | Report a problem


Exclusive: Why Michael Shannon Feels Lucky to Be Hollywood’s Most Reliable Supporting Actor

29 March 2017 9:02 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Michael Shannon can easily be described as Hollywood’s secret weapon. He’s a reliable working actor whose versatility onscreen has seen him emerge from Michael Bay’s Pearl Harbor to appear opposite Eminem in 8 Mile, earn an Oscar nomination in Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet’s highly anticipated onscreen reunion Revolutionary Road and walk away unscathed from Man of Steel, in which he played the critically panned blockbuster’s main baddie, General Zod. He’s repeatedly worked with directors that include Jeff Nichols, Liza Johnson, Michael Bay, Siofra Campbell and Werner Herzog.

In fact, Vulture even gave him that title in 2016 when he was promoting the back-to-back releases of Nocturnal Animals, which earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting actor, and Loving, the latter of which most fans probably didn’t even realize he was in until the actor suddenly appeared onscreen as a photographer who captures the story of Richard (Joel Edgerton) and Mildred »

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 32 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners