IMDb > Marlon Brando > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1997

1-20 of 55 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s The Island of Dr. Moreau | Review

27 February 2015 12:00 PM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

To Go On Two Legs: Gregory’s Fascinating Recapitulation of a Cinematic Train Wreck

Documentarian David Gregory graduates from an extensive history of shorts with his first feature length achievement, the verbosely titled Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s The Island of Dr. Moreau. However, the title is something of a misnomer, much like another recent examination of a project that never came to fruition with its originating director, Jodorowsky’s Dune. Stanley, who had gained a successful cult following in the early 90s for Hardware (1990) and the Miramax distributed Dust Devil (1992), would engage in the sort of uphill production battle that rivalled historical studio horror stories. Weather, nervous producers, pampered diva personalities, and ultimately, Stanley’s own limitations in reigning in such aggressive setbacks would result in his being fired from the set. However, the strangeness doesn’t stop there. Gregory manages to convey the extremity of a much maligned production, »

- Nicholas Bell

Permalink | Report a problem


Courtney Love Fails to Thwart Defamation Lawsuit

26 February 2015 4:03 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Courtney Love‘s attempts to dismiss her defamation lawsuit were thwarted on Thursday, when an appellate judge ruled the entertainer could indeed be sued, as she was less popular than Marlon Brando and her case lacked First Amendment implications. Dawn Simorangkir, the plaintiff in the lawsuit, is a fashion designer who goes by the nickname “Boudoir Queen,” and this is the second lawsuit she has levied against Love. See Photos: Hollywood’s Most Outrageous Lawsuits Simorangkir successfully sued the former Hole frontwoman for Twitter-based (a.k.a. “Twibel”) defamation in 2011 to the tune of $430,000, after the singer had called her »

- Travis Reilly

Permalink | Report a problem


10 sequels that ignored previous films

26 February 2015 8:15 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

In the wake of the Alien 5 news, here are 10 franchise sequels that also ignored at least one previous film.

We all have moments in our lives we'd prefer to forget, and so too do filmmakers. So what do you do when a movie franchise starts to go off the rails? Simple, just forget that the lesser films in the series never happened.

News recently broke that director Neill Blomkamp's taking this approach to the Alien universe. Recent interviews with both he and returning star Sigourney Weaver have revealed that Blomkamp's forthcoming sequel will not necessarily follow the events of Alien 3 and Alien: Resurrection, and pick up the story from Aliens instead (although he has since given a brief update on that).

Of course, we'll have to wait and see exactly how all this pans out. But it's by no means the first time in history that a film's »

- ryanlambie

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: ‘Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s Island of Dr. Moreau’

24 February 2015 5:33 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

One of the all-time greatest cinematic train wrecks is given blow-by-blow chronicling in “Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s Island of Dr. Moreau.” The creation of the H.G. Wells’ story’s third official screen incarnation was beset by disasters even more bizarre than the delirious mess of a feature finally released in 1996, with stars Marlon Brando and Val Kilmer reportedly rivaling even Mother Nature as destructive on-set forces. Though not so imaginatively packaged as another recent unmaking-of docu, “Jodorowsky’s Dune,” David Gregory’s pic can hardly help but fascinate with its mix of archival materials and surviving-collaborator testimonies. A hit at genre fests, the pic should do well in specialized cable sales and home formats.

Writer-helmer Stanley was an Aussie horror/sci-fi prodigy who’d attracted favorable fan notice with modestly budgeted thrillers “Hardware” (1990) and “Dust Devil” (1992). A fan of Wells’ tale since childhood, he was »

- Dennis Harvey

Permalink | Report a problem


Critics Debate the Best and Worst of the Oscars

23 February 2015 3:38 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Three Variety critics agree to disagree about Oscar winners and losers both onscreen and on the Dolby stage.

Peter Debruge: Last year, the Academy made a statement in giving the best picture award to “12 Years a Slave.” This time around, over the course of a spread-the-wealth evening, it was the winners’ turn to speak their minds, and they did so in force, using Hollywood’s prom as a podium to demand equal rights — for women (“Boyhood’s” only winner, Patricia Arquette), for African-Americans (Common and John Legend, accepting “Selma’s” only win), for gays (“The Imitation Game” writer Graham Moore, urging young Lgbt viewers to “stay weird, stay different” as he collected the film’s lone statue), for those with disabilities (both Julianne Moore and Eddie Redmayne turned the spotlight on talents who achieved while coping with Als), and for immigrants (Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, offering a plea on behalf of »

- Peter Debruge, Justin Chang and Scott Foundas

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar No-Shows: 9 Winners Who Weren't There to Accept the Big Award

23 February 2015 4:45 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The Oscars sum up Hollywood quite tidily: The most popular people get together to find out who has been selected as being especially notable, and then everyone claps. If you're the type who likes attention - and let's face it, most who excel in Hollywood do - getting that moment onstage is a dream come true. Every now and then, however, an Oscar winner isn't present to receive his or her statuette. It's Hollywood heresy - the thought that someone would have somewhere more important to be than onstage, receiving applause. But it happens, and when it does, there's usually a good story behind it. »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscars 2015: 87th Academy Awards: As it happened

22 February 2015 3:55 PM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Good evening and welcome to the 87th Academy Awards, live from the Dolby Theater in Hollywood, Los Angeles.

The biggest movie event of the year is with us once more, and Digital Spy will be bringing you comprehensive live coverage, from the first Manolos on the red carpet to the last teary speech from the stage.

Refresh your memory with this list of all the nominations and compare your prediction cards with our guesses for who will win all the major gongs.

21:15What were your favourite moments from tonight? And what do you think of all the big winners, especially Birdman's victory over Boyhood? Do let us know in the comments box below, and stick around on DS for our full reaction to the ceremony.

21:14Neil Patrick Harris was undoubtedly a bit hit and miss, lacking confidence in the middle more than anything else, but there were »

Permalink | Report a problem


Weird Oscar: The Strangest Moments at Hollywood's Biggest Night

22 February 2015 6:45 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The Academy Awards offer a huge, guaranteed audience of both industry and civilian fans. That makes it a unique opportunity for stars and non-stars alike to act out with the assurance that someone, somewhere will be paying attention to them. And this has happened a lot. As we approach the 87th Academy Awards, let's take a look back at some of the strangest moments to grace Oscar night. Some Dude Steals Alice Brady's Oscar In 1938, as the story goes, an unidentified man strode onstage to accept Alice Brady's Best Supporting Actress Award (for In Old Chicago), because she »

- Alex Heigl, @alex_heigl

Permalink | Report a problem


10 People Brave Enough To Accept Their Razzie Awards

20 February 2015 9:18 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

United Artists

It’s fair to say that, generally speaking, if you tell someone they’re awful at something they’re not going to take it well. No one likes to be criticised and when that criticism comes in a public forum, people can sometimes spit their dummies out in annoyance.

For the most part, this is true of Hollywood luminaries who have been awarded a Razzie. The Golden Raspberry Awards is, after all, all about recognising the very worst that Hollywood has to offer, whether it’s terrible performances, incoherent screenplays or godawful direction.

Even truly great people have found themselves under the unwanted spotlight of the Razzies – while nominations and wins for actors like Adam Sandler and Paris Hilton are to be expected, Al Pacino, Marlon Brando and Laurence Olivier have all been given awards, while directors such as Gus Van Sant and Michael Cimono have been dishonoured with Worst Director trophies. »

- Andrew Dilks

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscars Facts: 25 Things You (Probably) Don't Know About the Academy Awards

20 February 2015 2:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

The 87th Academy Awards are this Sunday evening, and we're counting down the minutes!

We've already given you our Oscar predictions, and now we're bringing you a few of the best (and craziest) Academy Awards facts. From the first Best Actor winner to the "one dollar" Oscar rule, here are 25 things you (probably) don't know about the Oscars.

1. The youngest Oscar winner was Tatum O'Neal, who won Best Supporting Actress for "Paper Moon" (1973) when she was only 10 years old. Shirley Temple won the short-lived Juvenile Award at 6 years old.

2. At 82, Christopher Plummer became the oldest person to win an Academy Award. He received the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his work in "Beginners" (2010) opposite Ewan McGregor.

3. After winning Best Actress for "Cabaret" (1972), Liza Minnelli became (and still is) the only Oscar winner whose parents both earned Oscars. Her mother, Judy Garland, received an honorary award in 1939 and her father, Vincente Minnelli, »

- Jonny Black

Permalink | Report a problem


Movita Castaneda, Actress and Wife of Marlon Brando, Dies at 98

17 February 2015 9:53 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Actress Movita Castaneda — the second of Marlon Brando’s three wives, who appeared in such films as Mutiny on the Bounty opposite Clark Gable and Fort Apache with John Wayne — has died. She was believed to be 98. Castaneda died Thursday in a Los Angeles rehabilitation center after suffering a neck injury, a family friend told the Los Angeles Times.  Castaneda played Tehani, a beautiful Tahitian who marries one of the insurgent sailors, in the 1935 version of Mutiny on the Bounty. The film was remade in 1962 with Brando, then Castaneda’s husband, playing the Gable role of Fletcher Christian. In

read more

»

- Mike Barnes

Permalink | Report a problem


The Battle for ‘Lawrence of Arabia’

16 February 2015 5:45 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Part I: The Lawrence Bureau

T.E. Lawrence (1888-1935) ranks among the 20th Century’s oddest heroes. This short, smart, and mischievous British soldier helped organize the Arab Revolt against Turkey, a secondary front of the First World War. He became Emir Feisal’s trusted ally, painfully conscious that the Allies wouldn’t honor promises of independence. After the Paris Peace Conference, Lawrence retreated into the Royal Air Force and Tank Corps as a private soldier, T.E. Shaw.

Lawrence lived a curious double life, befriending both private soldiers and notables like Winston Churchill and George Bernard Shaw. He wrote memoirs and translated Homer while repairing boats and seaplanes. His intellect, warmth, and puckish humor masked internal torment – guilt for failing to secure Arab freedom, regret for two brothers killed in the war, shame over an incident where Turkish soldiers sexually assaulted him.

In his autobiography Seven Pillars of Wisdom, Lawrence »

- Christopher Saunders

Permalink | Report a problem


The 10 Most Awkward Oscar Moments Ever

15 February 2015 2:38 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

While the Oscars are primarily about great movies and contemporary glamor, they're also a tremendous source of awkwardness. The mortifying moments of the Academy Awards are just as memorable as the "Titanic"-size triumphs, and today we're remembering the ten times we clutched our throats hardest in Oscar-induced agony. 1. Melissa Leo swears, rambles, and forces Kirk Douglas to do prop comedy. Melissa Leo's infamous "Consider" campaign, in which the respected "Homicide: Life on the Street" actress vied for an Oscar with a bizarrely egomaniacal poster promo, sullied the excitement around her great performance in "The Fighter." But somehow she made things worse by winning the Oscar, throwing down a senseless, weird speech (complete with an f-bomb), and enacting a hokey cane dance with presenter Kirk Douglas. Easily the most cringe-inducing dais moment of the past decade.  2. David Niven notices a nudist's shortcomings. He didn't lose his cool, but three-time »

- Louis Virtel

Permalink | Report a problem


Beyond Narrative: The Future of the Feature Film

12 February 2015 12:01 PM, PST | blogs.suntimes.com/ebert | See recent Roger Ebert's Blog news »

Editor's Note: RogerEbert.com is proud to reprint Roger Ebert's 1978 entry from the Encyclopedia Britannica publication "The Great Ideas Today," part of "The Great Books of the Western World." Reprinted with permission from The Great Ideas Today ©1978 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

It's a measure of how completely the Internet has transformed communication that I need to explain, for the benefit of some younger readers, what encyclopedias were: bound editions summing up all available knowledge, delivered to one's home in handsome bound editions. The "Great Books" series zeroed in on books about history, poetry, natural science, math and other fields of study; the "Great Ideas" series was meant to tie all the ideas together, and that was the mission given to Roger when he undertook this piece about film.

Given the venue he was writing for, it's probably wisest to look at Roger's long, wide-ranging piece as a snapshot of the »

- Roger Ebert

Permalink | Report a problem


Berlin Review: Anton Corbijn's 'Life' is a Bland James Dean Biopic Starring Dane DeHaan and Robert Pattinson

9 February 2015 12:45 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Only a few years after Marlon Brando delivered his virile performance in Elia Kazan's 1951 adaptation of Tennessee Williams' play "A Streetcar Named Desire," another ballsy actor gave Brando a run for his money. James "Jimmy" Dean, a good-looking, farm-raised, 24-year-old nobody who wowed in Kazan's 1955 drama "East of Eden" before becoming a full-on sex symbol in Nicholas Ray's suburban teenage drama "Rebel Without a Cause." Arguably one of the most sought-after actors of the time, Dean died in a car accident shortly after the release of "Rebel."  "Life," filmmaker-photographer Anton Corbijn's follow-up to last year's "A Most Wanted Man," offers a glimpse of Dean's early career through the lens of Dennis Stock, an ambitious photographer who finds an original appeal in the Indiana-born actor. The film chronicles the relationship between the two men, as Stock attempts to kickstart his career and Dean struggles »

- Eric Eidelstein

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 Sundance Diary: ‘Listen to Me Marlon,’ ‘Pervert Park,’ ‘Seoul Searching’ & Festival Wrap-Up

9 February 2015 9:25 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Park City, Utah – This is the last batch of Sundance reviews I’ve got to offer. A tad late, but I couldn’t let these films go uncommented on, especially with their special offerings for those who seek them out. I hope that each of these films finds an audience.

Aside from “Listen to Me Marlon” (which will be debuting on Showtime soon), I have also recommended both of these films for the third annual Chicago Critics Film Festival, the next fest for your radar, which takes off May 1-7, 2015 at the Music Box Theater.

Nonetheless, below are reviews for documentaries “Listen to Me Marlon” and “Pervert Park,” along with a take on a personal favorite, the narrative film “Seoul Searching.” After that, you’ll find a brief recap of my Sundance experience, along with very brief words on a few other movies I saw.

Listen to Me Marlon

‘Listen »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Stewart Stern, Writer of ‘Rebel Without a Cause,’ Dies at 92

6 February 2015 3:13 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Twice Oscar-nominated screenwriter and Emmy-winning television writer Stewart Stern, who wrote film classic “Rebel Without a Cause,” Dennis Hopper’s “The Last Movie” and seminal telepic “Sybil,” starring Sally Field, died February 2 at the Swedish Hospital in Seattle, after battling cancer. He was 92.

Stern’s credits included the iconic 1955 James Dean teen rebellion drama “Rebel Without a Cause (screenplay by Stern, adaptation by Irving Shulman, story by Nicholas Ray), as well as a documentary feature on the late actor, “The James Dean Story” (1957), co-directed by Robert Altman; 1971’s notorious counterculture indie drama “The Last Movie,” co-written and directed by Hopper (written by Stern, story by Hopper and Stern); 1963’s The Ugly American,” starring Marlon Brando (screenplay & screen story by Stern, from the novel by William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick), which earned Stern a Writers Guild Award nomination for best written American drama; and the Paul Newman-directed 1968 film “Rachel, »

- Variety Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Stewart Stern, Writer of ‘Rebel Without a Cause,’ Dies at 92

6 February 2015 3:13 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Twice Oscar-nominated screenwriter and Emmy-winning television writer Stewart Stern, who wrote film classic “Rebel Without a Cause,” Dennis Hopper’s “The Last Movie” and seminal telepic “Sybil,” starring Sally Field, died February 2 at the Swedish Hospital in Seattle, after battling cancer. He was 92.

Stern’s credits included the iconic 1955 James Dean teen rebellion drama “Rebel Without a Cause (screenplay by Stern, adaptation by Irving Shulman, story by Nicholas Ray), as well as a documentary feature on the late actor, “The James Dean Story” (1957), co-directed by Robert Altman; 1971’s notorious counterculture indie drama “The Last Movie,” co-written and directed by Hopper (written by Stern, story by Hopper and Stern); 1963’s The Ugly American,” starring Marlon Brando (screenplay & screen story by Stern, from the novel by William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick), which earned Stern a Writers Guild Award nomination for best written American drama; and the Paul Newman-directed 1968 film “Rachel, »

- Variety Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Week in Review: New details on Terrence Malick’s ‘Knight of Cups’ and ‘Voyage of Time’

6 February 2015 12:58 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Terrence Malick is having a busy week, which for the director who formerly took ages between films, must rank among his busiest. Malick has first been working on a documentary called Voyage of Time that will incorporate footage from The Tree of Life and be “a celebration of the universe, displaying the whole of time, from its start to its final collapse,” according to a press release via HitFix. One version of the film will be just 40 minutes long, will feature narration by Brad Pitt, and will appear on IMAX screens. Another longer version will appear in traditional theaters and will be narrated by Cate Blanchett. Neither version has a release date just yet but are being planned for 2016.

His latest film however, Knight of Cups, is about to premiere at the Berlinale on February 8 (watch the trailer here), and the full plot revealed for the film sounds perfectly Malick-esque. »

- Brian Welk

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: Ennio Morricone In Concert At The O2 Arena In London

6 February 2015 11:38 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

(Photo copyright 2014 by Mark Mawston. All rights reserved.)

By Mark Mawston

Ennio Morricone, one of the most celebrated film composers in cinema history, appeared to a packed 02  arena in London’s Docklands on February 5th 2015. The venue, (formally The Millennium Dome) normally a mainstay for Boy Bands and Revered Rockers, seemed Cathedral -like, not only due to its sheer size and capacity, but mainly due to the soaring music which filled it over two hours. This concert, unlike other Morricone concerts I’ve had the pleasure to attend, had a reverential feel to it, one of reflection. The music that the 100 strong orchestra and 75 piece choir gave life to wasn’t simply the most popular from the composer’s incredible body of work but obviously the ones that meant to most to him personally. Tracks from films such as Casualties Of War, 1900, The Mission and Cinema Paradiso were the ones given centre stage. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1997

1-20 of 55 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners