IMDb > Marlon Brando > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1997

1-20 of 158 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


See the Roman Epic Martin Scorsese Created When He Was Only 11 Years Old

43 minutes ago | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

  At age 11 in New York City, Martin Scorsese’s imagination was already deeply entrenched in the cinema. The future director suffered from asthma and was unable to play sports or run around like the rest of the children in his neighborhood. Instead, he spent countless hours at his local movie theater with his family, where he developed an abiding love for film. It was during this time that Scorsese developed an epic Roman film called The Eternal City, which he imagined would star Marlon Brando, Richard Burton, Virginia Mayo, Alec Guinness and others. Scorsese even drew a series of storyboards for the drama, which Open Culture describes as a “Cecil B. Demille-like production.” The filmmaker called it “a fictitious story of Royalty in Ancient...

Read More

»

- Alison Nastasi

Permalink | Report a problem


Look at Roman Epic Storyboards By an 11-Year Old Martin Scorsese

2 hours ago | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Today we all know Martin Scorsese as the director of acclaimed films like Hugo, The Wolf of Wall Street, GoodFellas, Taxi Driver, Mean Streets and the Best Picture winning The Departed. But at a young age, Scorsese had a taste for Roman epics, and he actually drew some incredible storyboards to illustrate what his film would look like. These drawings popped up in David Thompson's incredible book Scorsese on Scorsese, but now they've been posted in great quality online. These are super impressive for an 11-year old kid, and what's even more awesome is that at this young age, Scorsese already knew who he wanted to star. Here's 11-year old Martin Scorsese's storyboards from Cinephila and Beyond (via The Playlist): As you can see, the film is called The Eternal City, and the young Scorsese described it as "a fictitious story of royalty in Ancient Rome." And »

- Ethan Anderton

Permalink | Report a problem


Check Out The Storyboards By 11 Year-Old Martin Scorsese For Roman Epic 'The Eternal City'

4 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

"...dealing with Howard Hughes at this point in his life, his flaw, the curse so to speak, is the curse for all of us in terms of a nation, a country that acquires wealth like empires," Martin Scorsese told Film4 circa "The Aviator." "I love studying ancient history and seeing how empires rise and fall. They sow the seeds of their own destruction and I think that's what fascinated me. Ultimately the story asks, is that the wave of the future for everyone?" And it would seem that's been an area the director has been fascinated with since childhood. As if you needed any more reason to be in awe of Scorsese, here he is at 11 years-old, making storyboards for a Roman epic titled "The Eternal City." For the imagined movie, the young Scorsese dreamcasted Marlon Brando, Richard Burton, Virginia Mayo and Alec Guinness, for what was described as “a »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Daily | Books | Brando, Kazan, Olivier

26 July 2014 12:45 PM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Two especially noteworthy reviews of Susan L. Mizruchi's new book on Marlon Brando have appeared this weekend, both of them somewhat conflicted. The Financial Times' Antonia Quirke asks, "Can’t we leave him as he was: a beautiful maelstrom of dissembling? And yet this always interesting, addictive book (I didn’t move for two days) does repeatedly demonstrate how brilliantly Brando dreamt himself up." More book reviews: In the New York Times Book Review, Charles Isherwood recommends a "highly readable" collection of letters by Elia Kazan and John Simon argues that Philip Ziegler’s new biography of Laurence Olivier "may well be the best yet—perhaps even definitive." » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem


Philip Seymour Hoffman's Last Days

25 July 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

In honor of Philip Seymour Hoffman's final film, A Most Wanted Man, hitting theaters today, we are reprinting David Browne's cover story on the actor's final days from our February 27th issue. 

Slouched in the front row of the labyrinth Theater Company's performance space in New York's West Village last May, Philip Seymour Hoffman was his typical focused, superdisciplined self. In the intimate 90-seat theater, Hoffman – always dressed in one or another of his seemingly interchangeable baggy pants and sweaters – was relentlessly pushing the cast and crew of the play he was directing, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Marlon Brando: Intellectual

21 July 2014 2:19 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Marlon Brando? Really? Haven’t his life, sex life, innovative acting, alcoholic mother and abusive father, drug-dependent children, and countless attachments been strip-mined by so many authors that there is nothing left to extract? With considerable skepticism I came to "Brando’s Smile," Susan Mizruchi’s unexpectedly empathic and involving intellectual biography of the actor. The Boston University professor read between – and next to – the lines of the 4,000 volumes and dozens of scripts in Brando’s personal library. His handwritten marginalia reveal aspects of the man unknown to most. “As the first biographer to have reviewed Brando’s archives,” Mizruchi reports in her eye-opening account, ” . . . I can report that Brando’s hunger for knowledge was as insatiable as his legendary appetites for women and food.” And how. The volumes at his bedside when he died attest both to his wide range of interests and also to his subversive side. Of »

- Carrie Rickey

Permalink | Report a problem


James Garner Passes Away at Age 86

21 July 2014 7:06 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Actor James Garner, who starred in hit TV shows such as Maverick and The Rockford Files, passed away on Saturday at the age of 86 in his Brentwood area Los Angeles home.

Born James Bumgarner in Norman, Oklahoma, James Garner became a merchant seaman before moving to Los Angeles to work at his father's carpeting business, before serving in the Korean War, where he earned the Purple Heart before his discharge in 1952. After studying business administration at the University of Oklahoma for a semester, he returned to Los Angeles to pursue a career in acting.

After landing small roles in the TV series Cheyenne, James Garner landed a contract at Warner Bros. at $200 a week, where he had a number of supporting roles before his breakout performance in Sayonara alongside Marlon Brando. That lead to his first starring role in Darby's Rangers after Charlton Heston walked off of the production.

In »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


Actor James Garner Dead at 86

20 July 2014 6:18 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

©2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved

Oscar-nominated actor James Garner has passed away at the age of 86.

From AP:

Garner, whose whimsical style in the 1950s TV Western “Maverick” led to a stellar career in TV and films such as “The Rockford Files” and his Oscar-nominated “Murphy’s Romance,” was found dead of natural causes at his home in the Brentwood area of Los Angeles Saturday evening, Los Angeles police officer Alonzo Iniquez said early Sunday.

Police responded to a call around 8 p.m. Pdt and confirmed Garner’s identity from family members, Iniquez told The Associated Press.

There was no immediate word on a more specific cause of death. Garner had suffered a stroke in May 2008, just weeks after his 80th birthday.

Although he was adept at drama and action, Garner was best known for his low-key, wisecracking style, especially with his hit TV series, “Maverick” and “The Rockford Files. »

- Movie Geeks

Permalink | Report a problem


James Garner Of ‘The Rockford Files’, ‘Maverick’ & ‘The Notebook’ Passes Away At 86

20 July 2014 3:05 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

We’re sad to report that the prolific and legendary television and movie actor James Garner has died, aged 86.

Although starring in many films over the last seven decades, he’s undoubtedly best known for the huge success and his part in the TV shows Maverick and The Rockford Files, the latter of which he won an Emmy for in 1977.

His career initially kicked off in 1955 in La, after securing a few parts in the TV series Cheyenne Warner Bros signed him up and his upward trajectory began. We then saw him as a friend to Marlon Brando’s character in Sayonara, which in turn led to his first lead role in Darby’S Rangers – a part originally intended for Charlton Heston but he’d walked off the film.

The big role was yet to come though and in 1957, ABC launched the comedic Western and Bret Maverick was born and Garner was a perfect fit. »

- Dan Bullock

Permalink | Report a problem


R.I.P. James Garner (1928 – 2014)

20 July 2014 1:53 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

American actor James Garner has passed away aged 86, according to reports. An Academy Award-nominated film actor, Garner was best known for his TV work, appearing in the title role in the Western comedy series Maverick from 1957-1960, as well as playing private investigator Jim Rockford in The Rockford Files between 1974 and 1980.

Born in Oklahoma in 1928, Garner began his career in the mid-1950s, getting his breakthrough with a supporting role alongside Marlon Brando in Sayonara in 1957. After becoming a household name through his work on Maverick, Garner enjoyed a number of film roles in the 1960s, including The Children’s Hour, Boys’ Night Out and The Great Escape.

After starring in The Rockford Files, Garner returned to the role of Bret Maverick for a shortlived revival in 1981, and also secured an Oscar nomination for Best Actor for his work in Murphy’s Romance.  In the 90s, he would return as »

- Gary Collinson

Permalink | Report a problem


James Garner of ‘Maverick,’ ‘Rockford Files’ Dies at 86

20 July 2014 12:25 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Amiable actor James Garner, whose moderately successful film career was eclipsed by two extraordinarily popular television series, “Maverick” and “The Rockford Files,” has died, according to reports. He was 86.

Like many popular leading men of Hollywood’s heyday, Garner boasted all-American good looks and a winning personality that carried him through comedy and drama alike. He was one of the first of TV’s leading men to cross over into films in the ’60s with such popular movies as “The Thrill of It All” and “The Americanization of Emily.” But he had his greatest impact in television, first on “Maverick” in the ’50s and then in the ’70s on “The Rockford Files,” for which he won an Emmy in 1977. He later appeared in several quality telepics including “Promise,” “My Name Is Bill W.” and “Barbarians at the Gate,” as well as the occasional strong feature such as “Victor/Victoria” and “Murphy’s Romance, »

- Richard Natale

Permalink | Report a problem


James Garner of ‘Maverick,’ ‘Rockford Files,’ Dies at 86

20 July 2014 12:25 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Amiable film and television actor James Garner, who starred in popular television series “Maverick” and “The Rockford Files,” died Saturday at his home in the Brentwood neighborhood of Los Angeles. He was 86.

Like many popular leading men of Hollywood’s heyday, Garner boasted all-American good looks and a winning personality that carried him through comedy and drama alike. Garner won two Emmys and racked up a total of 15 nominations. He had his greatest impact in television, first on “Maverick” in the ’50s and then in the ’70s on “The Rockford Files,” for which he won an Emmy in 1977. He later appeared in several quality telepics including “Promise,” “My Name Is Bill W.” and “Barbarians at the Gate,” as well as the occasional strong feature such as “Victor/Victoria” and “Murphy’s Romance,” for which he captured his sole Oscar nomination for lead actor.

Appreciation: James Garner Gracefully Bore the Weight »

- Richard Natale

Permalink | Report a problem


'Easy Riders, Raging Bulls' Author Peter Biskind Looks Back at the New Hollywood

18 July 2014 10:34 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Right after Francis Ford Coppola turned a Mafia family’s travails into grand opera with 1972’s “The Godfather,” which went on to win 1972’s best-picture Oscar, he topped himself in 1974 with “The Godfather, Part II,” which became the first sequel to ever win the award. Later on, while preparing to film 1979’s “Apocalypse Now,” he tossed those Oscars out the window, shattering all but one. He was enraged that he couldn’t convince major stars such as Steve McQueen and Al Pacino to be his headliner. Eventually Marlon Brando did sign on. “The success … went to my head like a rush of perfume," Coppola recalled. "I thought I couldn’t do anything wrong.” Excess – fueled by fame, fortune and self-serving, often-destructive behavior  -- often goes hand in hand with success, especially in the movie biz. Few film history books proved that as well as “Easy Rider, Raging Bulls: How the »

- Susan Wloszczyna

Permalink | Report a problem


Tina Fey on Elaine Stritch: 'I Loved Her Voice, Her Timing, Her Stories and Her Natural Elegance'

18 July 2014 5:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

As Broadway prepares to dim its marquees on Friday night in tribute to Elaine Stritch, who died at her Michigan home on Thursday after a recent battle with stomach cancer, the highly individual actress-singer is being remembered by those who had the memorable experience of working with her, including 30 Rock creator and star Tina Fey. "Elaine was a 'tough old bird,' but I suspect she may have been a 'tough old bird' since birth," Fey tells People. "I loved her voice, her timing, her stories and her natural elegance. "One day she was wearing a beautiful butterfly cocktail ring, »

- Sheila Cosgrove Baylis and Stephen M. Silverman

Permalink | Report a problem


Elaine Stritch: a personality polished to a furious shine

17 July 2014 3:08 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The comic actor, who has died aged 89, performed a version of herself that became as famous as the songs she sang

From Sondheim to 30 Rock: Stritch's career in clips

Stritch interview: 'I'm a do-it-myself kind of broad'

In pictures: an incorrigible scene-stealer

Obituary: 'Feisty, quick-witted star'

I interviewed Elaine Stritch six years ago, when she was still in residence at the Carlyle hotel, her New York home of many years and, like a butler in a farce, the perfect foil to her eccentricity. It was a hot day and she wore tiny white tennis shorts, speaking as if everyone around her was deaf. "Get it right!" she said to the waiter, and later to herself, in relation to some story about her career. Her persona was polished to a furious shine.

At 82, Stritch still had years of performing ahead of her, mostly at the Carlyle, where she did her final »

- Emma Brockes

Permalink | Report a problem


Elaine Stritch: A toast to a stage legend

17 July 2014 2:45 PM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

“I’d like to propose a toast.” They’re just six simple words introducing “The Ladies Who Lunch” in the musical Company, but they’re the six words that introduced the scene that got theater and cabaret audiences talking about Elaine Stritch, who died today at age 89.

This bit, which unfolds over about 12 minutes with the tension of an ace Hitchcock thriller, is about as apt a descriptor of Stritch’s legacy as any: In the benchmark 1971 D.A. Pennebaker documentary Company: Original Cast Album, Stritch famously tries to get through a marathon show album recording. Tugging at her hair with voice tired and weary, »

- Jason Clark

Permalink | Report a problem


Remembering Elaine Stritch: 6 Things You Probably Didn't Know About the Broadway Icon

17 July 2014 2:15 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

An acid tongue, a tart persona and an arch sense of humor were the hallmarks of Elaine Stritch's career, which spanned some 60 years and hopped from stage to screen and back. The 89-year-old Broadway legend died of natural causes Thursday at her home in Birmingham, Michigan, leaving behind a body of work that included heralded stints on Broadway in, among others, the 1952 revival of Pal Joey, Noël Coward's 1961 musical Sail Away, and the groundbreaking 1970 production of Company. Although newer fans might most easily recognize her for playing the mother of Alec Baldwin's Jack Donaghy on 30 Rock, Stritch »

- Thom Geier

Permalink | Report a problem


Remembering Elaine Stritch: 6 Things You Probably Didn't Know About the Broadway Icon

17 July 2014 2:15 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

An acid tongue, a tart persona and an arch sense of humor were the hallmarks of Elaine Stritch's career, which spanned some 60 years and hopped from stage to screen and back. The 89-year-old Broadway legend died of natural causes Thursday at her home in Birmingham, Michigan, leaving behind a body of work that included heralded stints on Broadway in, among others, the 1952 revival of Pal Joey, Noël Coward's 1961 musical Sail Away, and the groundbreaking 1970 production of Company. Although newer fans might most easily recognize her for playing the mother of Alec Baldwin's Jack Donaghy on 30 Rock, Stritch »

- Thom Geier

Permalink | Report a problem


Elaine Stritch: Star of stage and screen passes away aged 89

17 July 2014 11:14 AM, PDT | The Independent | See recent The Independent news »

Elaine Stritch, the acidly funny star of the Broadway stage who also won three Emmys for her television work, has died at her home in Birmingham, Michigan. She was 89. The Detroit-born actress and singer studied acting at New York’s New School alongside Marlon Brando, began her career in the 1940s and was still known for playing brash, witty broads well into her final decade. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Elaine Stritch Dead at 89

17 July 2014 10:39 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

After a long, full, and varied career and a long, full, and varied life, Elaine Stritch passed away this morning. She was 89. Born in Detroit on February 2, 1925, Stritch left Michigan for New York to study at the New School's Dramatic Workshop alongside classmates Marlon Brando and Bea Arthur. She made her stage debut in 1944 and her Broadway debut in 1946, in Loco. She'd go on to a legendary stage career that included five Tony nominations, with her finally winning her first in 2002 for her one-woman show Elaine Stritch at Liberty. She is maybe best known for originating the role of Joanne in Stephen Sondheim's 1970 musical Company. (Read a full, wonderful timeline of here career here.)Stritch, of course, had many notable roles in TV and movies, leading her to eight Emmy nominations and three wins. Most recently, she is possibly best known for playing Jack Donaghy's cantankerous »

- Jesse David Fox

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1997

1-20 of 158 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners