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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1997

1-20 of 68 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


New Directors/New Films Review: Gripping 'Listen To Me Marlon' Reveals The Man Behind The Myth Of Marlon Brando

27 March 2015 1:48 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

“I coulda been a contender! I coulda been somebody, instead of a bum, which is what I am, let's face it.” That classic scene from “On The Waterfront” was part and parcel behind Marlon Brando's release into the stratosphere of supercool. Beginning with his stage debut as Stanley Kowalski in “A Streetcar Named Desire” (which he, of course, reprised in the 1951 film adaptation), his film debut in “The Men,” and a string of larger-than-life roles culminating with his Oscar-winning turn as Terry Malloy in 'Waterfront,' Hollywood was Brando's oyster in the 1950s, and a man became a cultural symbol. Through these roles, and future titanic turns in “The Godfather,” “Apocalypse Now,” and “The Last Tango in Paris,” we know and remember Marlon Brando as one of the greatest screen actors of all time. But, what of the man behind the actor? This question fuels Stevan Riley's documentary, »

- Nikola Grozdanovic

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Bradley Cooper Facts: 15 Things You (Probably) Don't Know About the Actor

27 March 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Bradley Cooper is on a hell of a run.

With a Best Actor nomination this year for "American Sniper," Cooper has now been nominated for an acting Oscar three years in a row. If he's nominated in 2016, he'll tie Marlon Brando for the most consecutive acting nods. All that from a guy who was afraid of being typecast as the "pretty boy."

From his hilarious big-screen debut to his early encounter with Sean Penn, here are 15 things you probably don't know about Bradley Cooper.

[Sources: IMDb, Wikipedia] »

- Jonny Black

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Every Will Ferrell Movie, Ranked From Worst to Best

26 March 2015 7:22 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Will Ferrell will turn 48 years old this summer. That’s how old Marlon Brando was when he was in The Godfather. Ferrell’s post-SNL movie career — and he has been gone from the show for 13 years — has been among the most successful in the show’s history; he has now been headlining big-budget studio comedies for more than a decade. This means there’s a trove of Ferrell movies to dig through and rank. Twenty-seven, to be exact. Now, to properly rank Ferrell movies, we had to put down some ground rules: No movies in which Ferrell is only a voice actor — this excludes Megamind, but not The Lego Movie; no movies that went direct to video — sorry, 1997’s Men Seeking Women, in which Ferrell was a supporting actor to Grant Shaud. And no glorified cameos — sorry, Wedding Crashers, Starsky & Hutch, and, yikes, Boat Trip. This list isn’t »

- Will Leitch,Tim Grierson

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See This or Die: 'They Shoot Horses, Don't They?'

23 March 2015 1:35 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Like the best horror and opera, "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" is always stylish and always grim. In the pantheon of essential movies you only need to see once because their impact is so specific and traumatizing, "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" is my ultimate recommendation. It's a movie that promises cynicism from the get-go, accumulates snideness and rancor with each step of its harrowing Depression-era dance marathon, and -- without ever straying from its blatant nihilism -- offers up something beautiful: a story as carnivalesque as a Hitchcock thriller but as prescient as "Network." I refuse to tell you much more about it. I guarantee you will not regret watching it, and I promise you will wonder why its message, power, and performances aren't more vaunted. If you're not gasping at Susannah York's Oscar-nominated unraveling, you're shrieking at Gig Young's Oscar-winning lunacy. If Michael Sarrazin's plummy-eyed innocence isn't breaking your heart, »

- Louis Virtel

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‘Plunder Road’ is a fast paced, ruthlessly efficient heist adventure

20 March 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Plunder Road

Written by Steven Ritch

Directed by Hubert Cornfield

U.S.A., 1957

It is a wet, late night. Raindrops fall down on the sleepy Utah countryside like a hail of bullets on a battlefield. Five men in two trucks drive silently to a mysterious location, each wrestling internally with the rising tension befitting a major heist scheme. They are Eddie (Gene Raymond), Commando (Wayne Morris), Skeets (Elisha Cook Jr.), Roly (Stafford Repp) and Frankie (Steven Ritch, who also serves as screenwriter). Amidst the impressive storm they successfully halt a speeding train, blow up the outside wall to one of its cars and make away from a hefty sum of gold bullion. This is but the first part of their plan, for now the group must traverse police roadblocks along the way to the City of Angels, all while under the guise of various types of truck drivers (liquid chemical transportation, »

- Edgar Chaput

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Bill Hickman: Hollywood's Wheelman

17 March 2015 3:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By

Alex Simon

Hollywood, like any place that is more about its lore than the actual sum of its parts, is full of unsung heroes who have given audiences some of their most cherished cinematic moments. Odds are if you’re a movie buff, you’ll remember the car chases in iconic films like Bullitt, The French Connection and The Seven-Ups. Stuntman, stunt driver and later, stunt coordinator Bill Hickman was one of those people who remained virtually anonymous during his lifetime, but is responsible for some of cinema’s most iconic, and hair-raising moments.

The Los Angeles native was born in 1921 and had been working in Hollywood for ten years before landing his first (visible) role in Stanley Kramer’s legendary The Wild One, the 1953 film that cemented star Marlon Brando’s status as an icon of post-war teen rebellion. Hickman can be seen as one of Brando’s »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

15 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later, »

- Andre Soares

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Watch: Robert Rodriguez's 45-Minute Talk With Francis Ford Coppola About His Films, Career, And Much More

13 March 2015 10:27 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Over on the El Rey network, Robert Rodriguez has been putting together a growing number of insightful filmmaker talks with his "The Director's Chair" series. So far, John Carpenter, Guillermo del Toro, and Quentin Tarantino have sat down in conversation with Rodriguez, and the latest director to stop by, is none other than the legendary Francis Ford Coppola. Across forty-five minutes, the always interesting Coppola recounts the origins of his fascination with storytelling (comparing himself to Max Fischer from "Rushmore" at one point), various aspects of shooting "The Godfather" (including collapsing when Paramount told him he couldn't hire Marlon Brando), the three stipulations he had before agreeing to make the sequel, and more. There's lots to take in and this is a must watch for any cinephile, so take a break and watch below.  »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

11 March 2015 2:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year. »

- Andre Soares

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Wright and Goldwyn Have an Ugly Parting of the Ways; Brando (More or Less) Comes to the Rescue

11 March 2015 2:07 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright-Samuel Goldwyn association comes to a nasty end (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Film.") Whether or not because she was aware that Enchantment wasn't going to be the hit she needed – or perhaps some other disagreement with Samuel Goldwyn or personal issue with husband Niven BuschTeresa Wright, claiming illness, refused to go to New York City to promote the film. (Top image: Teresa Wright in a publicity shot for The Men.) Goldwyn had previously announced that Wright, whose contract still had another four and half years to run, was to star in a film version of J.D. Salinger's 1948 short story "Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut." Instead, he unceremoniously – and quite publicly – fired her.[1] The Goldwyn organization issued a statement, explaining that besides refusing the assignment to travel to New York to help generate pre-opening publicity for Enchantment, »

- Andre Soares

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Albert Maysles dies, aged 88 by Amber Wilkinson - 2015-03-06 18:17:14

6 March 2015 10:17 AM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Documentarian Albert Maysles in support of documentary White Gold in 2013 Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze Documentary pioneer Albert Maysles has died at the age of 88.

The New York-based filmmaker is best known for the ground-breaking fly-on-the-wall documentaries he made with his brother David (who passed away in 1987), including Grey Gardens and Salesman.

The director - whose Harlem-based Maysles Documentary Center and Cinema continues to promote up-and-coming directors and who was frequently seen at film events in the city - became famous with his sibling for their "direct cinema" technique, which favoured intimate observation over more formal interview-style documentary techniques.

Grey Gardens, which profiled the reclusive socialites Edith Bouvier and her daughter Edith Bouvier Beale, went on form the basis of the Broadway show of the same name, while the Maysles' profile of the Rolling Stones' American tour Gimme Shelter also earned them worldwide attention. Whether he was dealing with bible salesmen or »

- Amber Wilkinson

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Remembering Actress Wright: Made Oscar History in Unmatched Feat to This Day

4 March 2015 9:02 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright movies: Actress made Oscar history Teresa Wright, best remembered for her Oscar-winning performance in the World War II melodrama Mrs. Miniver and for her deceptively fragile, small-town heroine in Alfred Hitchcock's mystery-drama Shadow of a Doubt, died at age 86 ten years ago – on March 6, 2005. Throughout her nearly six-decade show business career, Wright was featured in nearly 30 films, dozens of television series and made-for-tv movies, and a whole array of stage productions. On the big screen, she played opposite some of the most important stars of the '40s and '50s. It's a long list, including Bette Davis, Greer Garson, Gary Cooper, Myrna Loy, Ray Milland, Fredric March, Jean Simmons, Marlon Brando, Dana Andrews, Lew Ayres, Cornel Wilde, Robert Mitchum, Spencer Tracy, Joseph Cotten, and David Niven. Also of note, Teresa Wright made Oscar history in the early '40s, when she was nominated for each of her first three movie roles. »

- Andre Soares

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10 Things That Wouldn’t Exist Without Leonard Nimoy

2 March 2015 1:08 PM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Paramount

The world lost a true original this week when Leonard Nimoy, star of stage and screen (and a whole lot more besides), passed away from complications of a lung disease he was diagnosed with last year. He was 83 years old. Nimoy is gone, but by no means forgotten – his huge body of work and significant influence cause him to be greatly missed, but mean there is a lot to remember him by.

Besides, duh, the highly logical Spock of Star Trek – the acting job that got him his big break and earned him literally millions of fans across the globe for generations – Nimoy was a highly accomplished actor in other films, TV work, and multiple stage shows. Did you know he was in an early theatre production of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, in the Jack Nicholson role? And looked up to Marlon Brando?

Leonard Nimoy was a real polymath, »

- Tom Baker

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Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s The Island of Dr. Moreau | Review

27 February 2015 12:00 PM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

To Go On Two Legs: Gregory’s Fascinating Recapitulation of a Cinematic Train Wreck

Documentarian David Gregory graduates from an extensive history of shorts with his first feature length achievement, the verbosely titled Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s The Island of Dr. Moreau. However, the title is something of a misnomer, much like another recent examination of a project that never came to fruition with its originating director, Jodorowsky’s Dune. Stanley, who had gained a successful cult following in the early 90s for Hardware (1990) and the Miramax distributed Dust Devil (1992), would engage in the sort of uphill production battle that rivalled historical studio horror stories. Weather, nervous producers, pampered diva personalities, and ultimately, Stanley’s own limitations in reigning in such aggressive setbacks would result in his being fired from the set. However, the strangeness doesn’t stop there. Gregory manages to convey the extremity of a much maligned production, »

- Nicholas Bell

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Courtney Love Fails to Thwart Defamation Lawsuit

26 February 2015 4:03 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Courtney Love‘s attempts to dismiss her defamation lawsuit were thwarted on Thursday, when an appellate judge ruled the entertainer could indeed be sued, as she was less popular than Marlon Brando and her case lacked First Amendment implications. Dawn Simorangkir, the plaintiff in the lawsuit, is a fashion designer who goes by the nickname “Boudoir Queen,” and this is the second lawsuit she has levied against Love. See Photos: Hollywood’s Most Outrageous Lawsuits Simorangkir successfully sued the former Hole frontwoman for Twitter-based (a.k.a. “Twibel”) defamation in 2011 to the tune of $430,000, after the singer had called her »

- Travis Reilly

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10 sequels that ignored previous films

26 February 2015 8:15 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

In the wake of the Alien 5 news, here are 10 franchise sequels that also ignored at least one previous film.

We all have moments in our lives we'd prefer to forget, and so too do filmmakers. So what do you do when a movie franchise starts to go off the rails? Simple, just forget that the lesser films in the series never happened.

News recently broke that director Neill Blomkamp's taking this approach to the Alien universe. Recent interviews with both he and returning star Sigourney Weaver have revealed that Blomkamp's forthcoming sequel will not necessarily follow the events of Alien 3 and Alien: Resurrection, and pick up the story from Aliens instead (although he has since given a brief update on that).

Of course, we'll have to wait and see exactly how all this pans out. But it's by no means the first time in history that a film's »

- ryanlambie

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Film Review: ‘Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s Island of Dr. Moreau’

24 February 2015 5:33 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

One of the all-time greatest cinematic train wrecks is given blow-by-blow chronicling in “Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s Island of Dr. Moreau.” The creation of the H.G. Wells’ story’s third official screen incarnation was beset by disasters even more bizarre than the delirious mess of a feature finally released in 1996, with stars Marlon Brando and Val Kilmer reportedly rivaling even Mother Nature as destructive on-set forces. Though not so imaginatively packaged as another recent unmaking-of docu, “Jodorowsky’s Dune,” David Gregory’s pic can hardly help but fascinate with its mix of archival materials and surviving-collaborator testimonies. A hit at genre fests, the pic should do well in specialized cable sales and home formats.

Writer-helmer Stanley was an Aussie horror/sci-fi prodigy who’d attracted favorable fan notice with modestly budgeted thrillers “Hardware” (1990) and “Dust Devil” (1992). A fan of Wells’ tale since childhood, he was »

- Dennis Harvey

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Critics Debate the Best and Worst of the Oscars

23 February 2015 3:38 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Three Variety critics agree to disagree about Oscar winners and losers both onscreen and on the Dolby stage.

Peter Debruge: Last year, the Academy made a statement in giving the best picture award to “12 Years a Slave.” This time around, over the course of a spread-the-wealth evening, it was the winners’ turn to speak their minds, and they did so in force, using Hollywood’s prom as a podium to demand equal rights — for women (“Boyhood’s” only winner, Patricia Arquette), for African-Americans (Common and John Legend, accepting “Selma’s” only win), for gays (“The Imitation Game” writer Graham Moore, urging young Lgbt viewers to “stay weird, stay different” as he collected the film’s lone statue), for those with disabilities (both Julianne Moore and Eddie Redmayne turned the spotlight on talents who achieved while coping with Als), and for immigrants (Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, offering a plea on behalf of »

- Peter Debruge, Justin Chang and Scott Foundas

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Oscar No-Shows: 9 Winners Who Weren't There to Accept the Big Award

23 February 2015 4:45 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The Oscars sum up Hollywood quite tidily: The most popular people get together to find out who has been selected as being especially notable, and then everyone claps. If you're the type who likes attention - and let's face it, most who excel in Hollywood do - getting that moment onstage is a dream come true. Every now and then, however, an Oscar winner isn't present to receive his or her statuette. It's Hollywood heresy - the thought that someone would have somewhere more important to be than onstage, receiving applause. But it happens, and when it does, there's usually a good story behind it. »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

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Oscars 2015: 87th Academy Awards: As it happened

22 February 2015 3:55 PM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Good evening and welcome to the 87th Academy Awards, live from the Dolby Theater in Hollywood, Los Angeles.

The biggest movie event of the year is with us once more, and Digital Spy will be bringing you comprehensive live coverage, from the first Manolos on the red carpet to the last teary speech from the stage.

Refresh your memory with this list of all the nominations and compare your prediction cards with our guesses for who will win all the major gongs.

21:15What were your favourite moments from tonight? And what do you think of all the big winners, especially Birdman's victory over Boyhood? Do let us know in the comments box below, and stick around on DS for our full reaction to the ceremony.

21:14Neil Patrick Harris was undoubtedly a bit hit and miss, lacking confidence in the middle more than anything else, but there were »

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1997

1-20 of 68 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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