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Tallinn Film Review: ‘Asphyxia’

Tallinn Film Review: ‘Asphyxia’
On the international stage and on the festival circuit, Iranian cinema is not immediately associated with genre. The impish, richly ambiguous films of Abbas Kiarostami and the humanist social dramas of Asghar Farhadi have loomed largest in terms of defining the national canon. But while Fereydoun Jeyrani’s “Asphyxia” — a contemporary Iranian take on classic film noir and Gothic horror — doesn’t seem like an obvious hybrid at first, it ultimately makes a compelling case for itself: As the movie progresses, it becomes thrillingly clear that the cruel gender politics of those sinister genres can map themselves in mutually illuminating ways onto an inquisitive critique of female oppression in contemporary Iran.

Still, “Asphyxia” is, first and foremost, an accessible, entertainingly blackhearted, unapologetically Hitchcockian thriller, with a social subtext lurking for those who look. It also manages the tricky business of plausibly updating its throwback genres while keeping the aesthetic — here shot in whispery, shadowy black-and-white
See full article at Variety - Film News »

In a Lonely Place review – Bogart still captivatingly cynical in noir classic

Humphrey Bogart’s boozy screenwriter plays off perfectly against a marvellous Gloria Grahame in Nicholas Ray’s hardboiled thriller from 1950

Humphrey Bogart’s world-weariness and romanticism take on something brutal and misogynist in this 1950 noir masterpiece directed by Nicholas Ray – and it’s a marvellous performance by Gloria Grahame. This national rerelease is linked to the Grahame retrospective at BFI Southbank, in London. It is adapted from the hardboiled thriller by Dorothy B Hughes, changing her story and rehabilitating the male lead in one way, but in another, introducing a new strain of pessimism and defeat.

Bogart is Dixon Steele, a boozy, depressive Hollywood screenwriter whose tendency to violence and self-hatred isn’t helped by the fact that he hasn’t had a hit in years. Like the directors, producers and actors he occasionally sees in bars, his best days were before the second world war. One night at a restaurant,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool’ Trailer: Annette Bening Enters the Race for Her First Oscar

‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool’ Trailer: Annette Bening Enters the Race for Her First Oscar
It’s hard to believe that Annette Bening has never won an Oscar. The 59-year-old actress has been nominated four times and got incredibly close to landing her fifth nomination last year for her wonderful lead role in Mike Mills’ “20th Century Women.” The Academy snubbed her, but she’s not wasting any time out of the awards season. Bening is back with “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool.”

“Liverpool” is based on the memoir by British actor Peter Turner and recounts his romance with the legendary and eccentric Hollywood actress Gloria Grahame during the last years of her life. Grahame won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in 1952’s “The Bad and the Beautiful” and appeared in films alongside Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, and Kirk Douglas.

Bening takes on the role of Grahame, while Jamie Bell plays Turner. The supporting cast includes Julie Walters and Vanessa Redgrave.
See full article at Indiewire »

Five Solid American Made Movies That Take Place in Mexico

There are a select number of things that come to mind when thinking about Mexico and the movies: Westerns, drug cartels, and sunny vacations. Unfortunately, most of those movies never see the land of the Aztec Sun during production. Some are made in New Mexico (that doesn’t count) while other are set in New Orleans (yes, it’s true). These five movies are awesome for one of two reasons. Either they are classics that will be talked about for another 100 years or they were actually shot entirely in Mexico. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre This movie stars Humphrey Bogart

Five Solid American Made Movies That Take Place in Mexico
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool: the tragic life of Hollywood sensation Gloria Grahame

She starred with Humphrey Bogart and James Stewart. But Gloria Grahame refused to bow to Hollywood sexism and was driven out. Frank Cottrell-Boyce on a new film about her finding love and a second life with a chaotic Liverpool family

In the late 1970s, Peter Turner was a young actor living in digs in Primrose Hill. One of his fellow lodgers in the London flat was Gloria Grahame – you know, the girl who couldn’t say no in Oklahoma!, the wayward small-town floozy in It’s a Wonderful Life.

By the time she met Peter, she was playing Sadie in a production of Somerset Maugham’s Rain at the Watford Palace. “She asked to borrow a shirt,” he says. “Then she needed a fiver. It escalated from there.” The couple began an on-off affair that seemed to dwindle to nothing – until late 1981. “Tuesday 29 September,” says Peter, embarking on a tale
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Casablanca is back in theatres this month as part of Cineplex's Classic Film Series

  • Cineplex
Casablanca is back in theatres this month as part of Cineplex's Classic Film SeriesCasablanca is back in theatres this month as part of Cineplex's Classic Film SeriesIngrid Randoja - Cineplex Magazine11/8/2017 1:47:00 Pm

"Here’s looking at you, kid.”“We’ll always have Paris.”“I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.”

Those are just three memorable lines from 1942’s Casablanca, one of the most loved, and quoted, films in Hollywood history.

Set during World War II, the film stars Humphrey Bogart as cynical American Rick Blaine, who runs a nightclub in Casablanca that’s frequented by spies, soldiers and refugees. Rick’s world is turned upside down when ex-lover Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) — who broke Rick’s heart when she deserted him in Paris years ago — arrives with her freedom-fighter husband Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid) and asks Rick for “letters of transit,” which will allow the couple to flee the Nazis.
See full article at Cineplex »

Cinematic Triumph Casablanca Returns to Theaters Nov. 12th & 15th

“Of all the gin joints, in all the towns, in all the world, she walks into mine”

Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and Paul Henreid form one of Hollywood’s most unforgettable love triangles in one of the most well-known – and most quoted – movies ever made: Casablanca. On Sunday, November 12, and Wednesday, November 15, moviegoers everywhere will say, “Here’s looking at you, kid,” when Casablanca returns to cinemas across the country in celebration of the its 75th All screenings, which are part of the TCM Big Screen Classics series from Turner Classic Movies and Fathom Events, will also include specially-produced commentary before and after the feature by TCM Primetime Host Ben Mankiewicz.

Set against the desperate backdrop of the titular Moroccan port city as World War II rages throughout Europe, Casablanca is the unforgettable tale of refugees who will do anything to escape the inexorable advance of Nazi forces and flee to America.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Red Dwarf: creating the pop culture of the future

Andrew Moir Oct 26, 2017

Andrew takes a nerdy dive into the pop culture real and fictional that's made its way into the world of Red Dwarf...

Creating culture within science-fiction can be tricky. It’s potentially alienating, with the audience required to understand allusions without a reference point. Then again, if you throw in too many contemporary references, the future starts to look dated pretty quickly. Red Dwarf has walked that fine line, building its own stars and entertainment but chucking in the familiar, just to keep the world grounded. We take a look at humanity’s future culture as seen through the eyes of Lister, Rimmer, Cat, Kryten and Holly.

See related Gunpowder episode 1 review Amazon Prime UK: what’s new in October 2017? New on Netflix UK: what's added in October 2017? Music

Red Dwarf set out its fictional musical world early on with the opening scenes of the first episode
See full article at Den of Geek »

Canon Of Film: Rebel Without A Cause

In this edition of Canon Of Film, we look at the James Dean classic, ‘Rebel Without a Cause‘. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

Rebel Without A Cause (1955)

Director: Nicholas Ray

Screenplay: Stewart Stern; adapted by Irving Shulman, from a story by Nicholas Ray

When I was 12-years old, I don’t know exactly what it was that possessed me to do so, but I sat down one night and watched ‘Rebel Without a Cause.’ I was into old-time 50s nostalgia, such as ‘Grease,’ and ‘Happy Days,’ and decided to see this movie and the James Dean persona/image that influenced many of that decade. Yet, what I found was something else that day. the realization that a film could reveal hidden messages, meanings, and metaphors that aren’t just what the film is about. I remember it distinctly, Jim Backus, who you
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Neo Noir Pays Homage to Welles' Crime Drama and Other Classics of the '40s and '50s

Neo Noir Pays Homage to Welles' Crime Drama and Other Classics of the '40s and '50s
Trouble Is My Business with Brittney Powell. Co-written by actor/voice actor Tom Konkle, who also directed, and Xena: Warrior Princess actress Brittney Powell, Trouble Is My Business is a humorous homage to film noirs of the 1940s and 1950s, among them John Huston's The Maltese Falcon and Orson Welles' Touch of Evil. Konkle stars in the sort of role that back in the '40s and '50s belonged to the likes of Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Dick Powell, and Alan Ladd. As the femme fatale, Brittney Powell is supposed to evoke memories of Jane Greer, Lizabeth Scott, Lauren Bacall, and Claire Trevor. 'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous film noir homage evokes memories of 'The Maltese Falcon' & 'Touch of Evil' A crunchy, witty, and often just plain funny mash-up of classic noir tropes, from hard-boiled private dicks to the easy-on-the-eyes femme fatales – in addition to dialogue worthy of Dashiell Hammett and, occasionally
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Saturday Night Live' Takes Aim At Harvey Weinstein Scandal, Pulls No Punches With Biting Commentary

'Saturday Night Live' Takes Aim At Harvey Weinstein Scandal, Pulls No Punches With Biting Commentary
Saturday Night Live took on the Harvey Weinstein scandal over the weekend with some seriously biting commentary that addressed the allegations against the producer, and the culture of sexism and sexual harassment that permeates Hollywood.

Colin Jost and Michael Che opened this week's "Weekend Update" by breaking down some of the excuses Weinstein presented for his alleged actions, and his reported intent to seek treatment for sex addiction.

"Somehow, I don't think that's going to help anybody," Jost said. "He doesn't need sex rehab, he needs a specialized facility where there are no women, no contact with the outside world, metal bars, and it's a prison."

Che went on to explain why the scandal was a difficult subject to tackle for Saturday Night Live and comics in general.

"This is a tough spot for a comedian, because it's so hard to make jokes about sexual assault, but it's so easy to make jokes about a guy that looks
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

If You Can't Rewatch 'Blade Runner' Before '2049,' Read This

If You Can't Rewatch 'Blade Runner' Before '2049,' Read This
Thirty five years ago, Harrison Ford took a gamble on Ridley Scott's Blade Runner. He was fresh off his starring roles in The Empire Strikes Back and Raiders of the Lost Ark and was looking to do something a little more edgy. Blade Runner, an adaptation of Phillip K Dick's novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was a perfect blend of film noir, science fiction and thought-provoking story elling. Inspired by the Humphrey Bogart-style private investigator films of the '40s and '50s, Blade Runner tells a gritty detective story set in a dystopian future that raises questions about what it means to...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Gun Fury 3-D

Rock Hudson and Donna Reed star in a kidnapping-vengeance-pursuit western filmed in large part in gorgeous Sedona, Arizona, in 3-D and (originally) Technicolor. It’s another 3-D treasure from the 1950s boom years. The trailer is in 3-D too.

Gun Fury 3-D

3-D Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1953 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 82 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Rock Hudson, Donna Reed, Phil Carey, Roberta Haynes, Leo Gordon, Lee Marvin, Neville Brand.

Cinematography: Lester WhiteMusical Director (Stock Music): Mischa Bakaleinikoff

Written by Irving Wallace, Roy Huggins

Produced by Lewis Rachmil

Directed by Raoul Walsh

I have a new theory for why the 1950s 3-D craze only lasted about 2.5 years: they couldn’t find any more one-eyed directors to make them.

Gun Fury arrived at the end of 1953, in the thick of what would be called the ‘fad’ of 3-D. Columbia Pictures jumped into ‘depth pictures’ as if it were a gimmick,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Razzia’

Toronto Film Review: ‘Razzia’
If political courage were a measure of artistic merit, Moroccan director Nabil Arouch’s “Razzia,” a kaleidoscopic drama about intolerance and social tumult in Casablanca, would be a formidable achievement. As it stands, Arouch’s decision to keep courting controversy after his last film, “Much Loved,” was banned from Morocco for its depiction of prostitution in Marrakech is laudable in a country where the censors hold sway. Yet the everything-is-connected framework, linking five stories across a 30-year span, plays like a multipronged pitchfork wielded against the establishment, with each character sharpened to a point. The message-first approach drains the film of spontaneity and depth, despite the rousing passion of its director. A prime spot in Tiff’s Platform competition will raise its profile, but “Razzia” may struggle to find a home, inside and outside Morocco.

With repeated references to “Casablanca,” Arouch draws a contrast between the romantic and rebellious spirit of the Humphrey Bogart-Ingrid Bergman classic
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Nabil Ayouch’s ‘Razzia’ is Morocco’s Foreign-Language Academy Awards Entry

Nabil Ayouch’s ‘Razzia’ is Morocco’s Foreign-Language Academy Awards Entry
Nabil Ayouch’s kaleidoscopic social drama “Razzia” which world premiered at the Toronto Festival, has been chosen as Morocco’s candidate in the foreign-language category of the 2018 Academy Awards.

The film was chosen byan independent commission nominated by the Moroccan Cinema Center (Ccm), composed of writers, directors, producers, distributors, plus a representative of the Ccm, and was chaired by writer and painter Mahi Binebine.

Ayouch is one of the Arab world’s best-known directors. Three of his previous features have been put forward by Morocco as its Oscar submission – Mektoub” (1998), “Ali Zaoua: Prince of the Streets” (2000), and “Horses of God” (2013).

In June, he became the first Moroccan to be invited as a lifetime member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, where one of the pre-requisites to be invited was that at least two of his films must have been shortlisted for the Academy Awards.

Ayouch said that he “was surprised and happy” to be
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hollywood Flashback: In 1948, a Hurricane Hit Bogart and Bacall in 'Key Largo'

Hollywood Flashback: In 1948, a Hurricane Hit Bogart and Bacall in 'Key Largo'
Key Largo.

The Hollywood Reporter called the John Huston film noir "a tense and vigorous drama that is inevitably headed for a leading position on Warners' list of top grossers this year." (It took in $8.1 million domestic — $82 million today — and ranked 12th among all films in 1948.) Largo's plot centered on a World War II veteran (Humphrey Bogart, then 48) visiting a Florida Keys hotel run by an...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Hollywood Flashback: In 1951, a Shocking Sex Scandal Undid Gloria Grahame

Hollywood Flashback: In 1951, a Shocking Sex Scandal Undid Gloria Grahame
Gloria Grahame, who’s portrayed by Annette Bening in Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, which premieres at Tiff on Sept. 12, had an exceptional career in the late 1940s and 1950s.

She won a supporting actress Oscar (for 1952’s The Bad and the Beautiful) and worked with legendary actors (Humphrey Bogart, Jimmy Stewart, Dorothy Lamour and Robert Mitchum) and directors (Fritz Lang, Elia Kazan, Vincent Minnelli and Nicholas Ray, whom she married). Grahame’s specialty was the film noir femme fatale. Unfortunately, she also made some fatal career moves.

In June 1951, Ray caught her in bed at their Malibu home...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Larry Sherman, New York Actor and Onetime Donald Trump Publicist, Dies at 94

Character actor Larry Sherman, who also served as publicist for Donald Trump in the 1980s, died Aug. 26 in New York of natural causes. He was 94.

Sherman received degrees in theater and journalism from the University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill, kicking around Manhattan with some stage roles and bit parts before segueing into a successful career as a sports journalist. He covered the 1962 Rome Olympics, and wrote for The Herald Tribune and Newsday before landing at the Long Island Press, where he worked for 25 years.

When the newspaper folded in 1977, Sherman moved to Los Angeles to take a job as head writer for the game show “The Joker’s Wild.” When that program went dark, he moved back to New York looking for work. “He began calling on his friends, and it was a guy at the New York Times, I think, who said ‘I hear this guy Trump is looking for a guy to do
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Larry Sherman, New York Actor and Onetime Donald Trump Publicist, Dies at 94

Character actor Larry Sherman, who also served as publicist for Donald Trump in the 1980s, died Aug. 26 in New York of natural causes. He was 94.

Sherman received degrees in theater and journalism from the University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill, kicking around Manhattan with some stage roles and bit parts before segueing into a successful career as a sports journalist. He covered the 1962 Rome Olympics, and wrote for The Herald Tribune and Newsday before landing at the Long Island Press, where he worked for 25 years.

When the newspaper folded in 1977, Sherman moved to Los Angeles to take a job as head writer for the game show “The Joker’s Wild.” When that program went dark, he moved back to New York looking for work. “He began calling on his friends, and it was a guy at the New York Times, I think, who said ‘I hear this guy Trump is looking for a guy to do
See full article at Variety - TV News »

When Authors Write Movies

  • Cinelinx
A look at 5 movies that you might not have known were written by famous authors. Sometimes they worked out, sometimes they did not.

Writing a movie can be a lot different from writing a book. Unlike a movie script, a novel is freeform. The author can take any style or format they would like to convey their ideas. A script, on the other hand, has to be able to be interpreted by the actors, filmmakers, and the audience. Therefore, it is typically structured in a certain way to help people working on the movie do their job and people watching the movie comprehend what is happening. Furthermore, a major difference between writing novels and movies is that movies are (mostly) restricted to the visual realm. It’s not easy to show audiences what characters are thinking, which severely limits plot and character development techniques. Overall, there are unique challenges to
See full article at Cinelinx »
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