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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1991

1-20 of 111 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Interview, Audio: Artistic Director Mimi Plauché on 53rd Chicago International Film Festival

12 October 2017 2:48 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – In May of this year, Cinema/Chicago – the parent organization of the 53rd Chicago International Film Festival (Ciff) – announced that Mimi Plauché was the new Artistic Director of the Fest. She assumed the position that had formally been held by Ciff founder Michael Kutza, who continues as President and CEO.

Mimi Plauché grew up in a film-loving family, but ended up in Asian studies during college, focusing on a doctorate in Japanese literature and film. She joined Ciff as a programmer in 2006, and was Programming Director before her promotion. As Artistic Director, she is responsible for all film programming at the Chicago International Film Festival, Cinema/Chicago’s year-round film slate, and community partnering. She also identifies established and emerging filmmakers for inclusion into the festival, and has already represented Ciff at other festivals throughout the world.

Mimi Plauché, the New Artistic Director for the 53rd Chicago International Film Festival

Photo credit: Timothy M. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Andrei Tarkovsky’s Final Film ‘The Sacrifice’ Receives Trailer for Theatrical Restoration

12 October 2017 6:32 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

After a gorgeous restoration of his landmark existential sci-f film Stalker earlier this year, another Andrei Tarkovsky masterpiece has been remastered and is coming to theaters. The director’s final film, The Sacrifice, has recently undergone a 4K restoration and ahead of a screening at New York Film Festival and theatrical run starting at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, a new trailer has arrived.

Judging from the trailer, this restoration does justice to Tarkovsky’s swan song with no shortages of haunting imagery. The Sweden-shot film follows an upper-class family who learns World War III is upon them. Starring Sven Vollter, Alexander Erland Josephson, Allan Edwall, Valerie Mairesse, Gudron S Gisladottir, and Susan Fleetwood, check out the trailer and poster below.

The sacrifice in Andrei Tarkovsky’s final film, completed only months before his death from cancer at the age of 54, is performed by Alexander, an aging professor who »

- Jordan Raup

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Reformed character by Anne-Katrin Titze

11 October 2017 8:53 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Paul Schrader‬ with ‪Kent Jones‬ on Martin Scorsese casting Albert Brooks in Taxi Driver: "Whenever he had a bad role, he put a comic in it." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Film Society of Lincoln Center's New York Film Festival's added sneak preview of Paul Schrader's First Reformed as a Special Event, starring Ethan Hawke and Cedric the Entertainer with Philip Ettinger and Amanda Seyfried was presented by the director at Alice Tully Hall. Director of Programming and Selection Committee Chair Kent Jones joined Schrader on stage for a post-screening discussion.

The influence of Andrei Tarkovsky, Jean-Luc Godard, Carl Theodor Dreyer, and Ingmar Bergman, Ethan Hawke's character coming from Robert Bresson's Diary of a Country Priest, Ida director Pawel Pawlikowski's encouragement, and what Martin Scorsese's casting of Albert Brooks in Taxi Driver had to with Cedric the Entertainer being in First Reformed were confessed by Paul Schrader. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Criterion Reflections – Episode 3 – Spring 1969

11 October 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Jordan Essoe, Trevor Berrett, Keith Enright, John Laubinger, and Robert Taylor to discuss five titles from the Spring of 1969: Ingmar Bergman’s The Rite, Louis Malle’s Calcutta, Dennis Hopper’s Easy Rider, Masahiro Shinoda’s Double Suicide and John Schlesinger’s Midnight Cowboy.

Episode Time Markers: Introduction: 0:00:00 – 0:11:00 The Rite: 0:11:01 – 0:45:20 Calcutta: 0:45:21 – 1:02:12 Easy Rider: 1:02:13 – 2:00:17 Double Suicide: 2:00:18 –  2:33:06 Midnight Cowboy: 2:33: »

- David Blakeslee

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‘Baa Baa Land’ Is an Eight-Hour Meditative Sheep Film That Actually Exists — Watch

6 October 2017 9:27 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Sometimes a thing exists that is so bizarre you just have to shrug and say, “Sure, why not?” In the tradition of slow cinema, the folks behind meditation app Calm have commissioned an eight-hour long film of sheep grazing in a meadow. Brilliantly titled “Baa Baa Land,” the movie’s tag line: is: “The dullest movie ever made? We think so. We hope you do too.”

“’Baa Baa Land’ is the first screen epic entirely starring sheep,” says the trailer in voiceover. “In a world of constant stress and information overload, of anxious days and restless nights, comes the chance at last to pause, to breathe, to calm our racing minds and fretful souls, to sit and stare — at sheep.

Read More:‘Happy!’ Trailer: Patton Oswalt Is a Blue Unicorn in Dark ‘Shrek’ & ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit?’ Mashup — Watch

At the film’s recent premiere in London’s West End, »

- Jude Dry

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Digital Screenplay Market Scriptd Adds Curation Element to Bolster Scripts From Underrepresented Groups

5 October 2017 7:39 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Think of Scriptd like IMDb, but for unproduced screenplays. The digital marketplace boasts an intuitive interface that makes it easy to sort through (totally digital) stacks of scripts, all looking for a home to call their own. First launched in 2015, the website packages each script for maximum readability, first listed by title, author, and logline, along with tags denoting if it’s a film, television, or web project. Click on a script, and you can read its first few pages and reach out if you’d like to purchase the full script or are eager to chat about picking up the rights.

Perhaps it’s too easy. In an effort to maximize the browsing capabilities of Scriptd and help shine a light on the works of traditionally underrepresented groups, Scriptd has now added a curated function in partnership with industry experts. Per Scriptd, their aim is simple: “to both increase inclusion and quality, »

- Kate Erbland

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‘Strangers’ Is Facebook’s Lesbian ‘Room 104,’ and It’s Streaming for Free — Watch

2 October 2017 12:48 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Mia Lidofsky has an impressive roster of mentors for having just helmed her first episodic series: After interning for Nicole Holofcener and John Cameron Mitchell early in her career, Lidofsky assisted Jesse Peretz on shows such as “New Girl,” “Nurse Jackie,” and two seasons of “Girls.” “Working for [Peretz] was my film school,” Lidofsky said of her de facto mentor, who is an executive producer on her “Strangers.” The seven-episode series follows a young woman living in Los Angeles who rents out her extra room on Airbnb. She finds herself in need of extra cash after boyfriend moves out when she cheats on him with a woman. As Isobel (Zoe Chao) struggles to make sense of her shifting sexuality, an eccentric cast of characters rotate through her house, bringing both inconveniences and unexpected wisdom.

“Airbnb became the perfect vehicle me to explore and to tell stories of people in their most vulnerable, »

- Jude Dry

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‘Strangers’ Is Facebook’s Lesbian ‘Room 104,’ and It’s Streaming for Free — Watch

2 October 2017 12:48 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Mia Lidofsky has an impressive roster of mentors for having just helmed her first episodic series: After interning for Nicole Holofcener and John Cameron Mitchell early in her career, Lidofsky assisted Jesse Peretz on shows such as “New Girl,” “Nurse Jackie,” and two seasons of “Girls.” “Working for [Peretz] was my film school,” Lidofsky said of her de facto mentor, who is an executive producer on her “Strangers.” The seven-episode series follows a young woman living in Los Angeles who rents out her extra room on Airbnb. She finds herself in need of extra cash after boyfriend moves out when she cheats on him with a woman. As Isobel (Zoe Chou) struggles to make sense of her shifting sexuality, an eccentric cast of characters rotate through her house, bringing both inconveniences and unexpected wisdom.

“Airbnb became the perfect vehicle me to explore and to tell stories of people in their most vulnerable, »

- Jude Dry

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Toronto Film Review: ‘Good Favour’

27 September 2017 3:06 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A young man stumbles out of the woods, wounded and desperate. A village of devout Christians welcomes him with open arms, nursing him back to health and giving him a place to stay. They don’t know who he is or where he came from, and the children in the village follow him closely, as if he possesses some magical powers. Is he a force for good? Or is he a malevolent spirit tasked with punishing them for their sins and hypocrisy? These questions hang in the air in Rebecca Daly’s “Good Favour” — and they just keep on hanging, until the intrigue gradually slips into boredom and the film’s determined ambiguity starts to feel like aggravating coyness. Daly succeeds at imagining the hardship and tarnished idealism of a religious community, but the film can’t survive on ambience alone. It’s missing answers.

With her third feature, following “The Other Side of Sleep” and “Mammal »

- Scott Tobias

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Oscars: Philippines Selects 'Birdshot' for Foreign-Language Category

26 September 2017 5:50 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The Philippines has chosen 24-year-old filmmaker Mikhail Red's Birdshot as its contender for consideration in the best foreign-language film category at the 2018 Oscars.

Equal parts coming-of-age drama and thriller, the film follows the story of young girl who accidentally shoots an endangered Philippine eagle. The film premiered last year at the Tokyo International Film Festival, where it won best film in the Asian Future section. It was later selected for the Ingmar Bergman International Debut Award at the Goteborg Film Festival.

The Film Academy of the Philippines' official Oscar selection committee announced its choice Tuesday. The organization said its »

- Patrick Brzeski

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Fantastic Fest 2017 Review: Rabbit Confidently Subverts Expectations at Every Turn

24 September 2017 6:05 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

As a longtime fan of Australian cinema, I will be the first to admit that as I watched the opening scene of Luke Shanahan’s Rabbit, I thought I could put my finger precisely on the type of cinematic experience that was coming my way. And boy, was I wrong. My favorite types of films are the ones that keep me guessing, or give me something I haven’t seen before, and Rabbit delivers that in spades. Much more than just a psychological horror movie, Shanahan’s latest is a beautiful celebration of Euro cinema from the ’70s, yet it still feels wholly steeped in this twisted modern reality where nothing is as it seems, and the horrors awaiting viewers go much deeper than just jump scares and gore.

With its booming opening credits and a hauntingly effective score drenched in gravitas, Rabbit immediately sets out to rattle those watching, »

- Heather Wixson

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Peter Schønau Fog’s ‘You Disappear’ Melds Bergman With Scandi-Noir [Tiff Review]

11 September 2017 10:50 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Traditionally, the mention of Scandinavian cinema brought to mind the monolithic body of work of Ingmar Bergman, or perhaps a few other big names. Nowadays, the region’s output is best known for its so-called Nordic noir, characterized by “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” and its sequels, as well as television shows like “The Killing.” Peter Schønau Fog’s sophomore effort “You Disappear”—a Danish/Swedish co-production making its International Premiere at Tiff after bowing in local markets last spring—takes a little bit from column A and a little bit from column B.

Continue reading Peter Schønau Fog’s ‘You Disappear’ Melds Bergman With Scandi-Noir [Tiff Review] at The Playlist. »

- Bradley Warren

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Tiff 2017. Correspondences #5

11 September 2017 6:18 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Dear Danny and Kelley,The Rider sounds lovely, and I’m happy to hear Chloé Zhao has built on the melancholy promise of her first film, Songs My Brother Taught Me. Artists with a gift for empathy create anticipation for new works. Artists whose single stylistic tool is shock, on the other hand, cause only dread. So it goes with mother!, Darren Aronofsky’s latest suite of seizures and my noisiest, least rewarding experience at Tiff so far. Genius is like fire in that it is born from what it burns, says Malraux, so this allegory on the malefic artistic process opens with the subtlety and maidenly restraint expected from the maker of Requiem for a Dream: a full frontal glimpse of an incinerated woman, her blistering skin suggesting a melting gold effigy. The drama proper belongs to another wax dummy, an unnamed young wife played by Jennifer Lawrence »

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‘Thelma’ Review: Ingmar Bergman Meets Stephen King in Joachim Trier’s Beguiling Lesbian Horror Movie

9 September 2017 10:15 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There’s something very wrong with Thelma, though we’re not quite sure what it is. We first meet her when she’s just a child, living with her devoutly religious family in a remote town on the coast of Norway. The girl’s father, Trond (Henrik Rafaelsen), takes her hunting on the shores of the frozen lake next to their house. Thelma walks ahead of her dad, entranced by the sight of a deer. Standing behind his daughter, Trond silently points his rifle at her head. He doesn’t pull the trigger, but the temptation is there.

Thelma” — an ominous, unnerving, and strangely powerful thriller about the most devious of human desires — might appear to be a change of pace for “Oslo, August 31st” writer-director Joachim Trier, but the story tenses and frets with the same melancholy glimmer that courses through his dramas. Here, the Norwegian’s filmmaker’s »

- David Ehrlich

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‘My Days of Mercy’ Review: Ellen Page and Kate Mara Find Love Across Party Lines in Heavy-Handed Capital-Punishment Drama — Tiff

8 September 2017 11:25 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Of all the possible twists in the star-crossed -overs genre, falling in love across the chain link fences dividing pro– and anti–death penalty activists is nothing if not novel. Throw in the wrench of sexual awakening, class differences, and the impending death of a parent, and you’ve got a lot of issues to handle in a single movie. The greatest triumph of “My Days of Mercy” is that it handles such heavy subject matter with grace and — mercifully — as light a touch as good taste will allow. Of course, that successful execution only goes so far in a lesbian romance about capital punishment. That’s a tough sell, no matter your politics.

Produced by stars Ellen Page and Kate Mara, along with Killer FilmsChristine Vachon, the film tells the story of a young activist named Lucy (Page) whose life is altered unimaginably by a tragedy that landed her father on death row. »

- Jude Dry

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‘Bodied’ Review: Eminem-Produced Satire Is the Most Subversive Hip-Hop Movie Ever — Tiff

8 September 2017 10:27 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If Eminem got a PhD in English without sacrificing his hip-hop talent, he might have turned out something like Adam (Calum Worthy), the scrawny white hero of Joseph Kahn’s “Bodied.” Kahn’s long-awaited follow-up to his snarky teen slasher comedy “Detention” is a hyper-stylized rap satire that plays out like Scott Pilgrim stumbling into “8 Mile” and stealing the spotlight. Set in an assaultive world of underground rap battles in which Adam finds himself unexpectedly talented, “Bodied” delivers the provocative goods at an alarming rate, and boasts Eminem as an executive producer as if to embolden its point.

With Adam learning to embrace racist and misogynist one-liners in his rise to hip-hop stardom, the movie might seem too crude for its own good, but “Bodied” — directed by an Asian American and largely starring people of color — has been designed to interrogate the very reaction provoked by its existence. It may be overlong and uneven, »

- Eric Kohn

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‘Borg/McEnroe’ Review: Shia Labeouf Is a Mad Genius, But This Tennis Drama Offers Nothing Else to Love

7 September 2017 3:04 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Shia Labeouf is hardly a dead ringer for a young John McEnroe — he looks more like one of Royal Tenenbaum’s grandchildren than anything else — but it’s hard to imagine anyone more perfect for the part. As a rising superstar in the early ’80s, the hotheaded McEnroe was as famous for his mid-match tantrums as he was for his tennis. He was one of the most gifted natural talents the game had ever seen, but he would erupt at a moment’s notice, self-destructing on some of the world’s biggest stages.

The parallels between McEnroe and the volatile young actor who plays him in “Borg/McEnroe” are obvious enough to make themselves, but the saving grace of Janus Metz’s relentlessly self-serious sports drama is that the film doesn’t take its casting for granted — it refuses to rest on the meta-textual fun of watching one explosive celebrity play another. »

- David Ehrlich

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Criterion Now – Episode 32 – Czech Films, Best Comedy Films, Lost in America

4 September 2017 4:09 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Aaron is joined by Becky D’Anna and Martin Kessler and we discuss favorite comedies, Czech films, and Lost in America. Becky is a massive Ingmar Bergman and Albert Brooks fan, so we dig deep into Brooks with Lost in America, and a little bit into Bergman. Martin is a massive Czech film expert, so we got his perspective on some of the potential Czech films that could be coming to Criterion. We also talk about the Top 100 Comedies list from the BBC, and the usual Criterion news and FilmStruck.

Episode Notes

17:30 – Czech Filmmakers

28:00 – List of Comedy Films

32:00 – Lost in America

57:00 – Short Takes

1:03:00 – FilmStruck

Episode Links Wrong Reel 313 – Terminator 2: Judgment Day Terminator 2: A Film That Changed My Life Reddit – Czech Phantom Pages BBC Critic’s Poll: 100 Greatest Comedies of All Time Albert Brooks – A Few Routines Episode Credits Aaron West: Twitter | Website »

- Aaron West

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Making the Simple Great: The Power of a Top Director

31 August 2017 8:04 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tom Jolliffe on the power of a top director…

We’ve all seen great directors deliver complex films, perhaps sprawling with ideas and scope. Perhaps an engrossing retelling of an event in history. A director like Christopher Nolan has spent almost his entire career on weaving complex and intricately stranded high concept films. It takes a good director to do the films he does. No question.

By the same token, there’s a big difference between a great director and a functional director. I think that can often be best illustrated in a film with a simple concept. Take a film for example, which in the context of a directors CV is fairly lithe. A lot of great directors have at least one in their filmography. In the case of Steven Spielberg’s Duel, it was the film that first brought him to attention. The film runs on the ruthlessly »

- Amie Cranswick

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Venice Film Review: ‘First Reformed’

30 August 2017 12:16 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paul Schrader has always been an amazingly protean filmmaker — going all the way back to the late ’70s, when the screenwriter of “Taxi Driver” first stepped behind the camera, leaping from “Blue Collar” to “American Gigolo,” from “Cat People” to “Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters,” from “Patty Hearst” to “The Comfort of Strangers,” from “Auto Focus” to “The Canyons.” Throughout his career, though, there are myths, memes, and motifs that remain quintessentially Schraderian: the repressed Calvinist upbringing that resulted in his never seeing a film until he was in his late teens; his fixation on the “transcendental” high rhapsodic austerity of Bresson, Dreyer, and Ozu; and, through all the pointy-headed fixation, the way he retained a down-and-dirty B-movie grandiosity.

Schrader’s “First Reformed,” which premiered tonight at the Venice Film Festival, spans those high/low, art/pulp obsessions with a reach as arresting as it is (knowingly) nutty. The movie is about a pensive, melancholy »

- Owen Gleiberman

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1991

1-20 of 111 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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