The true gems of the movie... my favorite character actors & actors that play great characters!

Love seeing these wonderful actors pop up in one movie after another in different roles while transferring my collection of vhs saves of unreleased movies to dvd-r... every one of them ads something special to the film they are in!
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1.
Eddie Acuff
Eddie Acuff is one of those wonderful supporting actors who peopled the fascinating world of Hollywood's A, B or Z movies. In a career spanning eighteen years he appeared in an amazing almost 300 movies and one TV episode! His appearances could be invisible (when deleted), hardly visible (he portrayed an endless series of cabbies...
“ Another actor whose majority of work is listed as 'uncredited'. I'm lucky to have saved lots of movies still not released that he appeared in as UNcredited and some of his 'credited' movies too like "Boulder Dam" (1936) "The Singing Marine" (1937) "It Happened Tomorrow" (1944) etc... including his last film role, as a taxi cab man in 1952's "Stop, You're Killing Me" w/Broderick Crawford. ” - ReelRarities
 
2.
Jack Albertson
A former song-and-dance man and veteran of vaudeville, burlesque and Broadway, Jack Albertson is best known to audiences as "The Man" in the TV series Chico and the Man, for which he won an Emmy. In 1968 Albertson, the brother of actress Mabel Albertson, won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in The Subject Was Roses, a part which also won him the Tony award during its Broadway run.
 
3.
Mabel Albertson
When, at 50, Mabel Albertson was given the supporting role of Mrs. Carter, young actress Aileen Stanley Jr.'s mother in a Warner Bros. Technicolor musical romance, little did she know that she was starting out a movie and TV career in which she would shine as "the ultimate haughty judgmental (often wealthy) mother-in-law (or mother...
“ She became well known on Bewitched (and I'm blessed to have her in a delightful episode I own on 16mm :) but she also did lots of pre-Bewitched work well worth watching! ” - ReelRarities
 
4.
Edward Andrews
Actor, Gremlins
The son of a Georgia minister, Edward Andrews debuted on stage in 1926 at age 12 and by 1935 had landed on Broadway. A solid character actor, his large physique and amiable demeanor made him a natural for the jovial, grandfatherly type or genial, small-town businessman which he often played, but also served him well when cast against type as a sinister...
“ I'm fortunate to have this wonderful character actor in a couple favorite movies I own on 16mm film, "Love in a Goldfish Bowl" (1961) w/Fabian & Tommy Sands and "Fluffy" (1965) w/ Tony Randall & Shirley Jones... and I'm lucky to also have saved the movies on vhs too since neither has yet to receive the 'official' dvd release they deserve! ” - ReelRarities
 
5.
Edward Arnold
Edward Arnold was born as Gunther Edward Arnold Schneider in 1890, on the Lower East Side of New York City, the son of German immigrants, Elizabeth (Ohse) and Carl Schneider. Arnold began his acting career on the New York stage and became a film actor in 1916. A burly man with a commanding style and superb baritone voice...
“ If not familiar with this exceptional actor I highly recommend two titles I'm blessed to have saved that are my favorites with him... "Wednesday's Child" (1934) that he stars in with Karen Morley & Frankie Thomas and "The Penalty" (1941) that he stars in with Lionel Barrymore & Marsha Hunt... both stories have a father & son theme, but are quite different in content... and both sadly :( still UNreleased. ” - ReelRarities
 
6.
Jim Backus
Jim Backus was born James Gilmore Backus on February 25, 1913 in Cleveland, Ohio. He was one of the few actors to do it all: radio, Broadway, movies, television and cartoons. After attending preparatory school in his hometown Cleveland, Backus enrolled at the American Academy of Dramatic Art, to ply his trade...
 
7.
Hermione Baddeley
Actress, Mary Poppins
A brash character actress who specialized in cinema, television, and theater, Hermione Youlanda Ruby Clinton-Baddeley was born on November 13, 1906 in Broseley, Shropshire. She was the youngest of four sisters - including Angela Baddeley, also an actress - and her half-brother, Very Rev William Baddeley, was a Church of England Minister...
 
8.
Buddy Baer
Buddy was the younger brother of world heavyweight champion Max Baer. In films, he played giants in Quo Vadis and Jack and the Beanstalk. When television westerns were in vogue in the '50s and '60s, he often played the heavy to super-sized heroes James Arness, Clint Walker and Chuck Connors.
 
9.
Max Baer
Max Baer is arguably best known today for siring Max Baer Jr., the actor who played Jethro Bodine on the classic TV series The Beverly Hillbillies. However, old-timers, followers of the sweet science and viewers of the film Cinderella Man all know that Max Sr. was boxing's heavyweight champion of the world for all of 364 days...
 
10.
Max Baer Jr.
The son of former heavyweight boxing champion Max Baer, Max Baer Jr. is a classic (except probably to him) example of Hollywood typecasting. Known around the world as "Jethro Bodine" in the smash TV series The Beverly Hillbillies, Baer did not find work as an actor in Hollywood for three years after the Hillbillies went off the air...
 
11.
Parley Baer
Actor, Dave
 
12.
Roy Barcroft
Actor, Oklahoma!
After serving in World War I, Roy Barcroft spent most of the 1920s and early 1930s moving from job to job. It was in the 1930s, after he moved to California with his wife, that he found his calling while acting in amateur theatrical productions. In 1937 he was appearing in bit parts in various genres...
 
13.
Binnie Barnes
British-born actress who appeared in both British and American films, but who found her greatest success in Hollywood second leads. After a variety of jobs, including nurse, chorus girl and milkmaid, Barnes entered vaudeville. She appeared in more than a score of short comedies with comedian Stanley Lupino before making her feature bow in 1931...
 
14.
Florence Bates
Actress, Rebecca
The American character actress, Florence Rabe, was the daughter of an antique store owner. She gained a degree in Mathematics from the University of Texas in 1906 and went on to a career in teaching and social work. She changed course after being persuaded by a friend to study law, and, passing her bar exam in 1914...
 
15.
Granville Bates
Balding, worried-looking character actor of the 1930's with a strong line in lawyers, judges, sheriffs, mayors and storekeepers. Could play choleric or obtuse. Had a career in dramatic plays on Broadway from 1925 to 1935. In films from 1929. Well-received performance in The Great Man Votes as a corrupt...
 
16.
Louise Beavers
Actress, Beulah
1930s and 1940s film actress Louise Beavers was merely one of a dominant gallery of plus-sized and plus-talented African-American character actresses forced to endure blatant, discouraging and demeaning stereotypes during Depression-era and WWII Hollywood. It wasn't until Louise's triumphant role in...
 
17.
Don Beddoe
American character actor. Raised in New York City and Cincinnati, Ohio, Beddoe was the son of a professor at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music who happened also to be the world-famous Welsh tenor, Dan Beddoe. Although Don Beddoe intended a career in journalism, he took an interest in theatre and became involved first with amateur companies and then with professional theatre troupes...
 
18.
Noah Beery Jr.
Familiar and well-liked character actor of very different persona than either his father, Noah Beery, or his uncle, Wallace Beery. He attended Harvard Military Academy but managed to make a number of appearances on film and on stage with his father before adulthood. At age 19, he began playing amiable second leads and occasional leading roles...
 
19.
“ Always enjoy her in any role I come upon her in... but always thought she was English, not until watching her today in Strange Intruder (1956) did I discover she's actually Australian! ” - ReelRarities
 
20.
Willie Best
One of the hard-working, unappreciated African-American actors of Hollywood's "Golden Era" who produced good work with what he was given. He starred alongside some of film's great comedians including the Marx Brothers, Bob Hope, Laurel and Hardy and three films with Shirley Temple. In addition to being a talented comedian and character actor...
“ Although he probably had to bite his tongue through some of his stereotypical of those times roles... and I'm pretty sure he did not give himself that atrocious nickname he was billed with in very early roles :( ... he was a hard working, working actor who wanted to act and every small part can find him in is a big contribution to that film!
I'm lucky to have saved quite a few still unreleased movies from the 30's & 40's that he appears in and look forward to whatever scene in which he shows up! ” - ReelRarities
 
21.
Clem Bevans
Actor, Saboteur
Born in 1879, Clem Bevans spent most of his performing career on the stage. First appearing in 1900 in a vaudeville act with Grace Emmett as a boy and girl act, he would move on to burlesque and eventually make the move to Broadway and even opera productions. His first screen appearance did not come until 1935...
 
22.
Whit Bissell
Whit Bissell came to Hollywood in the 1940s, and by the time he retired he had appeared in more than 200 movies and scores of TV series. He is best known for playing the evil scientist who turned Michael Landon into a half beast in the 1957 cult classic film I Was a Teenage Werewolf. Bissell specialized in playing doctors...
 
23.
Beulah Bondi
Character actress Beulah Bondi was a favorite of directors and audiences and is one of the reasons so many films from the 1930s and 1940s remain so enjoyable, as she was an integral part of many of the ensemble casts (a hallmark of the studio system) of major and/or great films, including The Trail of the Lonesome Pine...
 
24.
Neville Brand
Actor, Laredo
Neville Brand joined the US Army in 1939, bent on a career in the military. It was while he was in the army that he made his acting debut, in Army training films, and this experience apparently changed the direction of his life. Once a civilian again, he used his GI Bill education assistance to study drama with the American Theater Wing and then appeared in several Broadway plays...
 
25.
Helen Broderick
Actress, Top Hat
Helen Broderick was a deliciously funny character comedienne with vaudeville and stage experience, a close friend of Jeanne Eagels. The story goes that, at the age of 14, she ran away from home because her mother (who featured in operatic comedy) was totally obsessed by the theatre. Ironically, all the people she met turned out to be performers...
 
26.
Victor Buono
Larger than life, Laughtonesque, and with an eloquent, king-sized appetite for maniacal merriment, a good portion of the work of actor Victor Buono was squandered on hokey villainy on both film and television. Ostensibly perceived as bizarre or demented, seldom did Hollywood give this cultivated cut-up...
“ And oh what a character he was! Absolutely steals every scene he is in, in his own merry or scary way... we lost a HUGE talent when he passed so darn young at only 43! I'm lucky to have him on 16mm film in "4 for Texas" where all 6ft 3 of him is even more enjoyable on the big screen :) ” - ReelRarities
 
27.
Billie Burke
Billie Burke was born Mary William Ethelbert Appleton Burke on August 7, 1885 in Washington, D.C. Her father was a circus clown, and as a child she toured the United States and Europe with the circus (before motion pictures and after the stage, circuses were the biggest form of entertainment in the world)...
 
28.
Spring Byington
The possessor of one of Hollywood's gentlest faces and warmest voices, and about as sweet as Tupelo honey both on-and-off camera, character actress Spring Byington was seldom called upon to play callous or unsympathetic (she did once play a half-crazed housekeeper in Dragonwyck). Although playing the part of Mrs...
 
29.
Leo G. Carroll
One of the most indispensable of character actors, Leo G. Carroll was already involved in the business of acting as a schoolboy in Gilbert & Sullivan productions. Aged 16, he portrayed an old man in 'Liberty Hall'. In spite of the fact, that he came from a military family, and , perhaps, because of his experience during World War I...
 
30.
Hobart Cavanaugh
Worried-looking, balding, moustachioed and usually bespectacled small part character actor, prolific during the 1930s and 40s. Hobart Cavanaugh played downtrodden or henpecked little men -- the perennial victim, forever nervous or bewildered -- to absolute perfection. He was most at home as clerks, mailmen...
 
31.
George Cleveland
Actor, Lassie
Round-faced and twinkling, George Cleveland had a 58-year career of stage, vaudeville, motion picture, radio and television acting. His first film was Mystery Liner with Noah Beery and he went on to appear in 150 others. However, he is best remembered as Gramps on the original Lassie TV series.
 
32.
Charles Coburn
A cigar-smoking, monocled, swag-bellied character actor known for his Old South manners and charm. In 1918 he and his first wife formed the Coburn Players and appeared on Broadway in many plays. With her death in 1937, he accepted a Hollywood contract and began making films at the age of sixty.
 
33.
Walter Connolly
The name may have been forgotten, especially today (seven decades later), but the portly, apoplectic, exasperated figure on the 1930s screen wasn't. While his film career, save a couple of silents, lasted a paltry seven years (1932-1939), character actor Walter Connolly certainly ran the distance. While some film historians complain that a number of his performances were annoying or overbaked...
 
34.
Ellen Corby
Actress, The Waltons
Ellen Corby was born Ellen Hansen on June 3, 1911, in Racine, Wisconsin. She began her career as a bit player in the film Speed Limited in 1940. Ellen would not be seen on the big screen again until 1945 in Cornered. In 1946, she appeared in 14 films, although mostly in small, minor roles. One of them was in the Christmas classic It's a Wonderful Life...
 
36.
Donald Crisp
Donald Crisp was born George William Crisp at the family home in Bow, London. Donald's parents were James Crisp and Elizabeth Crisp, his birth was registered by his mother on 4th September 1882. Donald's sisters were Elizabeth, Ann, Alice (known as Louisa) and Eliza and his brothers were James, John and Mark...
 
37.
Jane Darwell
Missouri-born Jane Darwell was the daughter of a railroad president and grew up on a ranch in Missouri. She nursed ambitions to be an opera singer, but put it off because of her father's disapproval (she eventually changed her name to Darwell from the family name of Woodward so as not to "sully" the family name)...
 
38.
Pedro de Cordoba
Actor, Saboteur
Although many people are under the impression that Pedro de Cordoba was Mexican, his mother was French and his father was Cuban, and he was born in New York City. De Cordoba's career began in silent films, where he established himself as a solid character actor, and his career carried over into talkies...
 
39.
William Demarest
Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, William Demarest was a prolific actor in movies and TV, making more than 140 films. Demarest started his acting career in vaudeville and made his way to Broadway. His most famous role was in My Three Sons, replacing a very sick William Frawley. Demarest was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor in a Supporting role in the real-life biography...
 
40.
Andy Devine
Rotund comic character actor of American films. Born Andrew Vabre Devine in Flagstaff, Arizona, the later-to-be Rotund comic character actor was raised in nearby Kingman, Arizona, the son of Irish-American hotel operator Thomas Devine and his wife Amy. Devine was an able athlete as a student and actually played semi-pro football under a phony name (Jeremiah Schwartz...
 
42.
Mildred Dunnock
Petite American character actress who was celebrated for her definitive portrayal of long-suffering Linda Loman in Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman", a part she played opposite Lee J. Cobb at the Morosco Theatre for 742 consecutive performances between 1949 and 1950. Mildred recreated her...
 
43.
Jack Elam
Colorful American character actor equally adept at vicious killers or grizzled sidekicks. As a child he worked in the cotton fields. He attended Santa Monica Junior College in California and subsequently became an accountant and, at one time, manager of the Bel Air Hotel. Elam got his first movie job by trading his accounting services for a role...
 
44.
Frank Faylen
American character actor who specialized in average-guy parts and who could be equally effective in sympathetic or unlikeable roles. His parents, the vaudeville team of Ruf and Cusik, took him onstage with them when he was a baby, and Faylen grew up in the theatre. He attended St. Joseph's Preparatory College in Kirkwood...
 
45.
Stepin Fetchit
Stepin Fetchit remains one of the most controversial movie actors in American history. While he was undoubtedly one of the most talented physical comedians ever to do his shtick on the Big Screen, achieving the rare status of being a character actor/supporting player who actually achieved superstar status in the 1930s (becoming a millionaire to boot)...
“ Actual name Lincoln Perry. ” - ReelRarities
 
46.
Paul Fix
Paul Fix, the well-known movie and TV character actor who played "Marshal Micah Torrance" on the TV series The Rifleman, was born Peter Paul Fix on March 13, 1901 in Dobbs Ferry, New York to brew-master Wilhelm Fix and his wife, the former Louise C. Walz. His mother and father were German immigrants who had left their Black Forest home and arrived in New York City in the 1870s...
 
47.
Arthur Franz
Arthur Sofield Franz was born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, to Dorothy and Gustave Franz, German immigrants. He was a reliable character actor in many '40s and '50s "B" pictures, often cast as a friendly small-town businessman or professional (as in The Doctor and the Girl) or the lead's sympathetic friend (as in 1953's Invaders from Mars)...
 
48.
William Frawley
William Frawley was born in Burlington, Iowa. As a boy he sang at St. Paul's Catholic Church and played at the Burlington Opera House. His first job was as a stenographer for the Union Pacific Railroad. He did vaudeville with his brother Paul, then joined pianist Franz Rath in an act they took to San Francisco in 1910...
 
49.
Kathleen Freeman
Actress, Shrek
Kathleen Freeman's introduction to show business came very early in life. Her parents were vaudevillians, and she made her debut at age 2 in their act. Later she attended UCLA with intentions of becoming a pianist, but was bitten by the acting bug and never looked back. She gained experience on stage in various stock and repertory companies...
 
50.
Connie Gilchrist
With more than two decades of stage experience in France, England and on Broadway behind her, this moon-faced, heavy-set character actress first entered films in 1940. But no matter a film's genre - contemporary drama, historical costumer or shoot 'em up western - her Brooklyn roots always sounded through.
 
51.
Billy Gilbert
The son of singers in the Metropolitan Opera, Billy Gilbert began performing in vaudeville at age 12. He developed a drawn-out, explosive sneezing routine that became his trademark (he was the model for, and voice of, Sneezy in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs). Gilbert's exquisite comic timing made him the perfect foil for such comedians as Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy...
“ He is just so enjoyable to watch... what a sweetie! ” - ReelRarities
 
52.
Jack Gilford
Actor, Cocoon
Jack Gilford was born in Brooklyn, New York, as Yankel Gellman. He began his career in the Amateur Nights of the 1930s moving on to nightclubs as an innovative comedian doing satire and pantomime. He was a regular at the Greenwich Village nightspot, Cafe Society and hosted shows featuring Zero Mostel...
 
53.
James Gleason
James Gleason was born in New York City to William Gleason and Mina Crolius, who were both in the theatre. He was married to Lucile Gleason (born Lucile Webster), and had a son, Russell Gleason. As a young man James fought in the Spanish-American War. After the war he joined the stock company at the Liberty Theater in Oakland...
 
54.
Charley Grapewin
This old codger film favorite, born in 1869 (some reports say 1875), got into the entertainment field at an early age, first as a circus performer (aerialist and trapeze artist). Acting having then sparked his interest, he worked in a series of stock companies while writing stage plays on the side that he himself could star in...
 
55.
Charlotte Greenwood
Actress, Oklahoma!
Charlotte Greenwood was born Frances Charlotte Greenwood on June 25, 1890, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was a sickly child and her father left the family when she was very young. Charlotte grew into a healthy, six foot tall woman. She started her career dancing in vaudeville where she became known for her long legs...
 
56.
Alan Hale
Alan Hale decided on a film career after his attempt at becoming an opera singer didn't pan out. He quickly became much in demand as a supporting actor, starred in several films for Cecil B. DeMille and directed others for him. With the advent of sound Hale played leads in a few films, but soon settled down into a career as one of the busiest character actors in the business...
 
57.
Alan Hale Jr.
The son of the great character actor (and Errol Flynn sidekick) Alan Hale, Alan Hale Jr. (he dropped the Jr. after his father passed away) was literally born into the movies. Hale did his first movie as a baby and continued to act until his death. Unlike other child actors, Hale made a smooth transition in the movies and starred in several classics like Up Periscope...
 
58.
Margaret Hamilton
Margaret Hamilton was Born December 9, 1902 in Cleveland, Ohio to Jennie and Walter Hamilton. She later attended Hathaway Brown School in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and practiced acting doing children's theater while a Junior League of Cleveland member. Margaret had already built her resume with several performances in film before she came to her most memorable and astronomically successful role...
“ Of course we all know & love her star worthy performance in OZ... but she had many other smaller roles before & after, quite memorable in each!
I'm happy to have saved quite a few of her films from the 30's & 40's that have still not been released to dvd and a few I recommend if get a chance to see are... "Chatterbox" (1936) & "Mother Carey's Chickens" (1938) both w/Anne Shirley... "Stablemates" w/Wallace Beery & Mickey Rooney also from 1938 and 1942's "Faithful in My Fashion" w/Donna Reed. ” - ReelRarities
 
59.
Neil Hamilton
Actor, Batman
Neil Hamilton's show business career began when he secured a job as a shirt model in magazine ads. He became interested in acting and joined several stock companies. He got his first film role in 1918, but received his big break from D.W. Griffith in The White Rose. After performing in several more Griffith films...
 
60.
Myron Healey
American actor and occasional screenwriter. One of the most frequently seen heavies in films and television programs of the 1950s, his name is nevertheless well known only to buffs. Occasionally he played minor leads and sympathetic characters, but his stern good looks and rich deep voice made him a memorable villain, particularly in Westerns.
 
61.
Eileen Heckart
Versatile, award-winning character actress Eileen Heckart, with the lean, horsey face and assured, fervent gait, was born Anna Eileen Stark on March 29, 1919, in Columbus, Ohio. An only child, she lived with her mother after her parents separated at age 2. Her childhood was an acutely unhappy one. Her mother...
“ So enjoy her work... every role she's in is a memorable one! First caught my attention in The Bad Seed (1956), eerie movie you don't forget when see as a kid... and just love her in a favorite feature movie of mine that I'm lucky to also own on 16mm film, "Butterflies are Free" (1972). ” - ReelRarities
 
63.
Percy Helton
One of the most familiar faces and voices in Hollywood films of the 1950s. Percy Helton acted almost from infancy, appearing in his father's vaudeville act. The famed Broadway producer David Belasco cast Helton in a succession of child roles over several years, giving the boy an invaluable grounding in the technique and spirit of the theatre...
“ That voice, you know you recognize it! And he was the drunken Santa Clause in Miracle on 34th Street! ” - ReelRarities
 
64.
Pat Hingle
Actor, Batman
Pat Hingle (real name: Martin Patterson Hingle) was born in Miami, Florida, the son of a building contractor. His parents divorced when Hingle was still in his infancy (he never knew his father) and his mother supported the family by teaching school in Denver. She then began to travel (with her son in tow) in search of more lucrative work; by age 13 Hingle had lived in a dozen cities...
 
65.
Sterling Holloway
Popular American character actor of amusing appearance and voice whose long career led from dozens of highly enjoyable onscreen performances to world-wide familiarity as the voice of numerous Walt Disney animated films. Born in the American Deep South to grocer Sterling P. Holloway Sr. and Rebecca Boothby Holloway...
 
66.
Hedda Hopper
Actress, Sunset Blvd.
Her father was a butcher. In 1913 she met and married matinée idol DeWolf Hopper Sr. and in 1915 they moved to Hollywood, where both began active film careers. He became a star with Triangle Company, she began in vamp parts and turned to supporting roles. After her divorce she appeared in dozens of films...
 
67.
Edward Everett Horton
It seemed like Edward Everett Horton appeared in just about every Hollywood comedy made in the 1930s. He was always the perfect counterpart to the great gentlemen and protagonists of the films. Horton was born in Brooklyn, New York City, to Isabella S. (Diack) and Edward Everett Horton, a compositor for the NY Times...
 
68.
 
69.
Henry Jones
Actor, Vertigo
Henry Burk Jones was born in New Jersey and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Helen (Burk) and John Francis Xavier Jones, and the grandson of Pennsylvania Representative Henry Burk, a Prussian immigrant. He graduated from St. Joseph's College. His Broadway debut was in 1938 in Maurice Evans' "Hamlet" (Reynaldo and the second gravedigger)...
 
70.
Victor Jory
Actor, Papillon
Victor Jory was the boxing and wrestling champion of the Coast Guard during his military hitch, and never lost his big, burly physique. His sinister looks and distinctive voice typed him as a heavy, at which he excelled, but he did occasionally play sympathetic leads, one of which was, oddly enough, the sci-fi cult classic Cat-Women of the Moon.
 
71.
Cecil Kellaway
Cecil Kellaway was nominated for two Oscars for Best Supporting Actor for The Luck of the Irish and Guess Who's Coming to Dinner. Cecil was originally offered the role of Santa Claus in Miracle on 34th Street, but he turned it down, telling his son, "Americans don't go for whimsy." His works also include some television. He played Santa Claus on an episode of Bewitched and also appeared in The Twilight Zone.
 
72.
Guy Kibbee
Beginning his show business career at age 13 as an entertainer on Mississippi riverboats, Guy Kibbee graduated to the legitimate stage and spent many years in the theater. In the 1930s he was signed by Warner Brothers, and became part of what was known as "the Warner Brothers Stock Company", a cadre of seasoned character actors and actresses who enlivened many a Warners musical or gangster film...
 
73.
Jack Kruschen
Canadian-born Jack Kruschen entered films after years on the stage, and became a dependable character actor both in movies and on television. Often cast as ethnic comedy relief, Kruschen occasionally landed a role as a villain, but was more often the volatile, emotional Italian or Jewish neighbor patriarch. He was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in The Apartment.
 
74.
Arthur Lake
Actor, Blondie
His parents were circus acrobats and he became part of their act. When they changed to vaudeville and wound up in California, he got a job in the movies. The founder of Universal Pictures, Carl Laemmle changed his name to Lake. In silent films he played somewhat dimwitted youngsters, The long-running part of Dagwood in the "Blondie" series pretty much continued the the pattern into adult life...
 
75.
Jack Lambert
American character actor specializing in tough guys and heavies. A native of Yonkers, New York, he worked on the Broadway stage and then became an increasingly familiar figure in Westerns and crime dramas after World War II. Although almost as familiar a presence in films as his contemporaries Warren Oates...
“ 'I' do NOT find Jack Lambert to be unattractive AT ALL!! On the contrary, he has a great, character-filled face, perfect for the character actor he was... and a cleft chin is nothing but sexy!! I'm lucky to have him and another not recognized enough character actor on my list, Roy Barcroft, in a fine film I saved long ago "Freckles" (1961) ... good movie with great cast!
The UNcool, UNkind remarks shown here describing Mr. Lambert are IMDB auto-added, written by an IMDB contributor that if I had the ability to would have removed from my/this space where I add people as a compliment... but that is not an offered option here :( ” - ReelRarities
 
76.
Elsa Lanchester
Elsa Sullivan Lanchester was born into an unconventional a family at the turn of the 20th century. Her parents, James "Shamus" Sullivan and Edith "Biddy" Lanchester, were socialists - very active members of the Social Democratic Federation (SDF) in a rather broad sense and did not believe in the institution of marriage and being tied to any conventions of legality for that matter...
“ Love her in my original Vhs release of 1943's "Forever and a Day" ... she's so young & flirty and fun to watch :) ” - ReelRarities
 
77.
Jessie Royce Landis
Jessie Royce Landis was called "an international star" in her New York Times obituary. She was 20 when she made her stage debut at the Playhouse in Chicago as the young countess in "The Highwayman". Soon she was on Broadway. In 1950 she went to London for "Larger Than Life", a dramatization of W. Somerset Maugham's novel...
 
78.
Charles Lane
Mean, miserly and miserable-looking, they didn't come packaged with a more annoying and irksome bow than Charles Lane. Glimpsing even a bent smile from this unending sourpuss was extremely rare, unless one perhaps caught him in a moment of insidious glee after carrying out one of his many nefarious schemes...
 
79.
Sheldon Leonard
Sheldon Leonard was born in New York City's lower Manhattan, the son of Jewish parents. He studied acting at Syracuse University and, after graduating, landed a job on Wall Street. Following the Wall Street crash of 1929, he found himself unemployed and resolved to become a professional actor on the stage...
“ Although he was a top-notch writer & director... and the genius responsible for many wonderful tv shows... Danny Thomas, Andy Griffith, Dick Van Dyke, Gomer Pyle, My World and Welcome to It ... he had 106 acting credits to his name... and with his gravelly voice and dark looks he was perfect every time he played a 30's thug or western henchman! ” - ReelRarities
 
81.
Barton MacLane
Barton MacLane graduated from Wesleyan University, where he displayed a notable aptitude for sports, in particular football and basketball. Not surprisingly, his physical prowess led to an early role in The Quarterback with Richard Dix. MacLane once commented that, as an actor, he needed to have the physical strength to tear the bad guys "from limb to limb"...
 
82.
Marjorie Main
Her father was a minister, and when she joined a local stock company as a youngster she changed her name to avoid embarrassing her family. She worked in vaudeville and debuted on Broadway in 1916. Her film debut was in A House Divided. She repeated her stage role in Dead End as Baby Face Martin (Humphrey Bogart)'s mother...
 
83.
Mike Mazurki
With an intimidating face like craggy granite and a towering 6'5" solid frame, Mike Mazurki (born Mikhail Mazuruski or Mikhail Mazurkiewicz) was one of cinema's first serial thugs and specialized in playing strongarm men, gangsters and bullies for over 50 years on screen. Nearly always portrayed as a lowbrow muscle...
“ What tough mug :) ” - ReelRarities
 
84.
“ I just love all the McDaniel's, they always bring something unforgettable to the movies they appear even if only stepping in for a short time.
My favorite little role of Etta's is in a movie I saved that really pisses me off for not giving her the recognition she deserved, The Arizonian (1935) w/Richard Dix, not only does she have a memorable scene but she reprises the film's title song at film's end, sounding truer than the film's star who sings it at beginning of film... and although male Willie Best is deservedly credited, because he is, don't think it's a racial think that she was not... but then is disturbing to think Etta's failure to also be in credits may be a female thing... and that's way wrong, she should surely have been credited in that cast!! ” - ReelRarities
 
85.
Hattie McDaniel
After working as early as the 1910s as a band vocalist, Hattie McDaniel debuted as a maid in The Golden West. Her maid-mammy characters became steadily more assertive, showing up first in Judge Priest and becoming pronounced in Alice Adams. In this one, directed by George Stevens and aided and abetted by star Katharine Hepburn...
 
86.
“ Hattie & Ettie's big brother acted too, but almost all his roles were as 'uncredited'... I'm lucky to have saved a really good movie with one of his few 'credited' roles, "Bad Men of Missouri" (1941) ” - ReelRarities
 
87.
Ruth McDevitt
Actress, The Birds
Delightfully daffy and an apple dumpling of a darling, wizened character actress Ruth McDevitt was born Ruth Shoecraft in Michigan but raised in Ohio where her father served as a county sheriff. She attended the American Academy of Dramatic Art with designs of becoming an actress but married a Florida widower soon after and put full focus on being a wife...
 
88.
Donald Meek
Actor, Stagecoach
On British and Australian stage before coming to the USA in 1912, he played more than 800 roles, starting with Sir Henry Irving at age 8. He first appeared in the US at Castle Square Theatre, Boston, in 1912, and made his New York debut in 1917 in "Going Up".
 
89.
Doro Merande
Plain, angular Doro Merande was one of those delightful character actresses you couldn't take your eyes off of, no matter how minuscule the part. She excelled at playing older than she was -- doting aunts, inveterate gossips, curt secretaries and small-minded townspeople -- all topped with an amusing warble in her voice and bristly eccentric edge...
 
90.
John McGiver
John Irwin McGiver came to acting relatively late in life. He held a B.A. and Masters degrees in English from Fordham, Columbia and Catholic Universities and spent his early years teaching drama and speech at Christopher Columbus High School in the Bronx. He had an early flirt with the acting profession...
 
91.
Grant Mitchell
You would think stage and film veteran Grant Mitchell was born to play stern authoritarians; his father after all was General John Grant Mitchell. But Mitchell would actually be better known for his portrayals of harangued husbands, bemused dads and bilious executives in 30s and 40s films. Born in Columbus...
 
92.
“ Had to know who played 'Nellie' the sweet woman John Derek's shmoozing in Scandal Sheet... and discovered I recognized her from one of my favorite saves, 1952's "Just This Once" where she plays another uncredited character, the landlady "Mrs. Morgan" :) ” - ReelRarities
 
93.
Frank Morgan
Jovial, somewhat flamboyant Frank Morgan (born Francis Wuppermann) will forever be remembered as the title character in The Wizard of Oz, but he was a veteran and respected actor long before he played that part, and turned in outstanding performances both before and after that film. One of 11 children of a wealthy manufacturer...
 
94.
Harry Morgan
Actor, M*A*S*H
Harry Morgan was a prolific character actor who starred in over 100 films and was a stage performer. Known to a younger generation of fans as "Col. Sherman T. Potter" on M*A*S*H. Also known for his commanding personality throughout his career, he tackled movies and television in a way no other actor would do it...
 
95.
“ Actor Frank Morgan's older brother :) ” - ReelRarities
 
96.
Howard Morris
This short, quicksilver comic of TV's "Golden Age" has been heard more than seen in the last few decades, as he possesses one of the finest vocal instruments around for animation. Howard ("Howie") Morris was born in New York City in 1919 and forged his own destiny after a chance meeting with Carl Reiner in a radio workshop...
 
97.
Alan Mowbray
Alan Mowbray, the American film actor who was one of the founding members of the Screen Actors Guild, was born Ernest Allen on August 18, 1896, in London, England, to a non-theatrical family. He served in the British army during World War I and received the Military Medal and the French Croix De Guerre for bravery in action...
 
98.
Burt Mustin
Actor, Cat Ballou
Burt Mustin was a salesman most of his life, but got his first taste of show business as the host of a weekly radio variety show on KDKA Pittsburgh in 1921. He appeared onstage in "Detective Story" at Sombrero Playhouse in Phoenix Arizona, and played the janitor in the movie version, (Detective Story)...
 
99.
Mildred Natwick
A disarming character lady quite capable of scene-stealing, Mildred Natwick was a well-rounded talent with distinctively dowdy features and idiosyncratic tendencies who, over a six-decade period, assembled together a number of unforgettable matrons on stage and (eventually) film and TV. Whimsical, feisty...
 
100.