OS DIRETORES [UK]

1987
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1.
Rodney Ackland
Ackland studied for the stage at the Central School of Speech Training and Dramatic Art in London, England. He made his stage debut in 1924 at the Gate Theatre. Spent several years acting before turning to the cinema. His first screenwriting success came with his collaboration on Bank Holiday in 1938. His career was split between screen writing and his favoured medium of stage acting.
 
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Lewis Allen
Director, Suddenly
Born in England on Christmas Day, 1905, Lewis Allen first came on the show-biz scene when he was appointed executive in charge of West End and Broadway stage productions for famed impresario Gilbert Miller. Allen also co-directed some of the productions (including the celebrated "Victoria Regina" with...
 
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Ken Annakin
A former salesman and journalist, Ken Annakin got into the film industry making documentary shorts. His feature debut, Holiday Camp, was a comedy about a Cockney family on vacation. It was made for the Rank Organization and was a modest success, spawning three sequels, all of which he directed. He worked steadily thereafter...
 
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Jane Arden
Actress, Separation
Jane Arden was born in Wales in 1927 and left for London in her teens. She trained at RADA and quickly began working as an actress and playwright. It was there that she met her future husband, Philip Saville, who is now perhaps most known for his work Boys from the Blackstuff and The Life and Loves of a She-Devil. They had 2 children, Sebastian Saville and Dominic Saville and one step- child, Elizabeth Saville...
 
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Leslie Arliss
Director, The Man in Grey
Former journalist and film critic Leslie Arliss began his film career as a screenwriter in the 1930s, mainly for Gainsborough Pictures. He continued as a writer for ten years, leaving Gainsborough in 1941 when he was offered a chance to direct at Associated British. It wasn't long before he returned to Gainsborough and brought with him a young actor named James Mason...
 
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Robert Asher
Director, On the Beat
British director Robert Asher began his film career in 1934 as an assistant director, and in that capacity worked with such directors as Roy Ward Baker and Anthony Pelissier. He became a director in 1959 with the Norman Wisdom comedy Follow a Star. He and Wisdom were a good team, and Asher shot several more Wisdom comedies before making his last one with the comedian...
 
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Anthony Asquith
Director, Pygmalion
British film director Anthony Asquith was born on November 9, 1902, to H.H. Asquith, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and his second wife. A former home secretary and the future leader of the Liberal Party, H.H. Asquith served as prime minister of the United Kingdom from 1908-1916 and was subsequently elevated to the hereditary peerage...
 
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Jim Atkinson
Sound Department, Deliverance
 
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Richard Attenborough
Lord Richard Attenborough was born in Cambridge, England, the son of Mary (née Clegg), a founding member of the Marriage Guidance Council, and Frederick Levi Attenborough, a scholar and academic administrator who was a don at Emmanuel College and wrote a standard text on Anglo-Saxon law. Attenborough...
 
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Ray Austin
Director, Zorro
 
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John Badham
Director, WarGames
English-born "Army brat" John Badham is the son of English actress Mary Hewitt and the stepson of an American Army general. Raised in Alabama and schooled at Yale, he cut his teeth producing and directing for TV before making his feature debut with The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings. Badham's breakthrough credit was the box office smash Saturday Night Fever...
 
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Teddy Baird
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director, Pygmalion
 
22.
Robert S. Baker
Producer, The Saint
London-born Robert S. Baker served as an artilleryman in the British army during World War II, posted to North Africa (where he met future partner Monty Berman), and later joined the army's film and photography unit, becoming a combat cameraman in Europe. At war's end he and Berman formed Tempean Films to make movies...
 
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Roy Ward Baker
Roy Ward Baker's first job in films was as a teaboy at the Gainsborough Studios in London, England, but within three years he was working as an assistant director. During World War II, he worked in the Army Kinematograph Unit under Eric Ambler, a writer and film producer, who, after the war, gave Baker his first opportunity to direct a film...
 
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Antony Balch
A legendary figure in British film distribution of the 1960s and 1970s, Antony Balch was renowned for buying up European art/exploitation films and giving them catchy new English titles ("Weird Weirdo", "Don't Deliver Us From Evil"), as well as being responsible for the legendary sound version of Benjamin Christensen's silent documentary classic Häxan...
 
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Arthur Barnes
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director, Scrooge
 
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Zelda Barron
Miscellaneous Crew, Reds
 
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Charles Bennett
Writer, The 39 Steps
Born just before the century turned, Charles Bennett made his writing debut as a child in 1911, fought in France during World War I while still a teen and resumed his acting career after the war's end. In 1926 he dropped acting to concentrate on being a playwright, later turning one of his most famous plays...
 
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Compton Bennett
Compton Bennett started out as a bandleader and then became a commercial artist. He turned out a few amateur films that caught the attention of producer Alexander Korda's London Films, and they hired him in 1932 as a film editor. During World War II he directed a few instructional films for the British military and some propaganda shorts for the general public...
 
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Monty Berman
Producer, The Saint
Monty Berman was a producer of popular action series for ITC in the 1960's and early 70's. He was born Nestor Montague Berman to Jewish parents in the poor Whitechapel district of London. After completing his education at the University College School, he joined the small Twickenham Studio as a camera assistant in 1922...
 
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Robert Bolt
Son of a small shopkeeper, he attended Manchester Grammar School. He later said that he made poor uses of his opportunities there. He went to work in an insurance office, but later entered Manchester University, taking a degree in History. A post-graduate year at Exeter University led to a schoolmaster's position...
 
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John Boorman
Producer, Excalibur
John Boorman attended Catholic school (Salesian Order) although his family was not, in fact, Roman Catholic. His first job was for a dry-cleaner. Later, he worked as a critic for a women's journal and for a radio station until he entered the television business, working for the BBC in Bristol. There...
 
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Dallas Bower
Producer, Henry V
 
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Clive Brook
Born in London, England to Charlotte Mary (opera singer) and George Alfred Brook. He was educated privately. Stage experience included: "Oliver Twist", "Voysey Inheritence", "If I were King", "Importance of Being Ernest", Fair and Warmer", "Over Sunday", "Clothes and the WOman", and many others. Screen experience with Graham-Cutts Company in London...
 
59.
Peter Brook
Born in London, Peter was educated at Westminster, and Magdalen College Oxford. He has staged numerous productions for Birmingham Rep, Stratford Upon Avon and Broadway. In 1962 he was appointed Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, a position he held for 2 decades. His most famous stage productions have been Marat/Sade...
 
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John Bruce
Director, The Bill
 
62.
Adrian Brunel
Producer/director Adrian Brunel was a major director in England during the 1920s and 1930s. He founded Minerva Films in partnership with actor Leslie Howard, but his career started to fade during World War II. He later founded the London Film Society, an organization dedicated to eliminating censorship in Britain which prevented many classic Russian films from being seen in British theaters...
 
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Jack Buchanan
Born in Scotland, Jack Buchanan made his stage acting debut in Britain in 1912, and on Broadway in 1924. Though he made his film debut in 1917 during the silent film era, Buchanan is probably best remembered for The Band Wagon, co-starring with Fred Astaire, Cyd Charisse, Nanette Fabray, James Mitchell, Oscar Levant and Robert Gist...
 
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Harold S. Bucquet
Director, Dragon Seed
After serving in the US Army during World War I, British-born Harold S. Bucquet entered the film business, first as an extra and then as a set designer. He became an assistant to director Allen Holubar, and later was hired as an assistant director at MGM--a studio where he was to spend the rest of his career--in the shorts department and directed screen tests...
 
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Stuart Burge
Director, Othello
 
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Germain Burger
Cinematographer, Devil's Rock
 
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Richard Burton
Probably more frequently remembered for his turbulent personal life and multiple marriages, Richard Burton was nonetheless regarded as one of the great British actors of the post-WWII period. Burton was born Richard Walter Jenkins in Pontrhydyfen, Wales, to Edith Maude (Thomas) and Richard Walter Jenkins...
 
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Donald Cammell
Director, Performance
British director Donald Cammell, born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1934, came from a wealthy shipbuilding family. He began his career as a painter and by the mid-'60s was celebrated among the "Swinging London" crowd. He made his foray into the film industry when he wrote the script for The Touchables...
 
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Jack Cardiff
Almost universally considered one of the greatest cinematographers of all time, Jack Cardiff was also a notable director. He described his childhood as very happy and his parents as quite loving. They performed in music hall as comedians, so he grew up with the fun that came with their theatrical life in pantomime and vaudeville...
 
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John Paddy Carstairs
Writer-director John Paddy Carstairs was born Nelson Keys, the son of actor Nelson Keys and the brother of producer Anthony Nelson Keys, in London, England, in 1910. Beginning his career as an assistant cameraman, he worked his way up to screenwriter and made his directorial debut in 1933. While never at the front rank of British directors...
 
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Don Chaffey
Director, Pete's Dragon
British director Don Chaffey began his career in the film industry in the art department at Gainsborough Pictures. He began directing in 1951, often working on films aimed at children. He branched out into television in the mid-'50s, turning out many of the best episodes of such classic series as Danger Man...
 
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Charles Chaplin
Writer, Modern Times
Charlie Chaplin, considered to be one of the most pivotal stars of the early days of Hollywood, lived an interesting life both in his films and behind the camera. He is most recognized as an icon of the silent film era, often associated with his popular "Little Tramp" character; the man with the toothbrush mustache, bowler hat, bamboo cane, and a funny walk...
 
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Matthew Chapman
Writer, The Ledge
Matthew Chapman was born in Cambridge, England. He came to America in the 80s and has lived here ever since, first in Los Angeles, then, for the last ten years, in New York. He writes and directs films but also works as a journalist and author. He has written for Harpers Magazine, Huffington Post, and National Geographic among others...
 
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Roger Christian
Academy Award winner Roger Christian has had an extensive film career. He won an Academy Award for set decoration on director George Lucas's Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope, which began a long collaboration between the filmmakers. Christian subsequently worked with Lucas on Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi and was hand-picked by Lucas to direct the second unit on the recent Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace...
 
82.
Alan Clarke
Director, Scum
Liverpool native Alan Clarke got his start in the film business in Canada, where he studied acting and directing. Upon returning to England he got a job at ITV, then moved over to the BBC in 1969. He worked mostly in television, but he made a couple of feature films that got attention for their portrayal of the gritty and occasionally violent life of the British working class...
 
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David Cobham
Director, Woof!
 
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Lance Comfort
Director, Hotel Reserve
Director Lance Comfort began his film career as a camera operator. He also worked as a sound recordist and animator, mostly in British documentaries and medical training films. His first feature was the big-budget but slow-moving Courageous Mr. Penn, a biography of 18th-century political leader William Penn...
 
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Albert de Courville
Director, Doomed Cargo
Albert de Courville began his career as a stage director in Great Britain before turning to films in the 1930s. He directed several Jesse Mathews musicals, including There Goes the Bride, and a Constance Cummings comedy, Strangers on Honeymoon. In the 1940s he journeyed to New York and got back to his theatrical roots, directing several Broadway plays.
 
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