Science fiction writers

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Isaac Asimov
Isaac Asimov was born Isaak Judah Ozimov, on January 2, 1920, in Petrovichi shtetl, near Smolensk, Russia. He was the oldest of three children. His father, named Judah Ozimov, and his mother, named Anna Rachel Ozimov (nee Berman), were Orthodox Jews. Ozimov family were millers (the name Ozimov comes from the eponymous sort of wheat in Russian)...
H.G. Wells
Writer, born in Bromley, Kent. He was apprenticed to a draper, tried teaching, studied biology in London, then made his mark in journalism and literature. He played a vital part in disseminating the progressive ideas which characterized the first part of the 20th-c. He achieved fame with scientific fantasies such as The Time Machine (1895) and War of the Worlds (1898)...
Philip K. Dick
Writer, Blade Runner
Philip Kindred Dick was born in Chicago in December 1928, along with a twin sister, Jane. Jane died less than eight weeks later, allegedly from an allergy to mother's milk. Dick's parents split up during his childhood, and he moved with his mother to Berkeley, California, where he lived for most of the rest of his life...
Ray Bradbury
Ray Bradbury was an American science fiction writer whose works were translated in more than 40 languages and sold millions of copies around the world. Although he created a world of new technical and intellectual ideas, he never obtained a driver's license and had never driven a car. He was born Ray Douglas Bradbury on August 22...
Arthur C. Clarke
Arthur C. Clarke was born in the seaside town of Minehead, Somerset, England in December 16, 1917. In 1936 he moved to London, where he joined the British Interplanetary Society. There he started to experiment with astronautic material in the BIS, write the BIS Bulletin and science fiction. During World War II...
Richard Matheson
Richard Matheson has written novels and short stories, as well as screenplays for both film and television. He has sometimes written under the pen name, "Logan Swanson". His prose has often been adapted for the screen by others and sometimes by Matheson, himself. Notably, he is among the few writers who contributed to Rod Serling's classic television series...
Fredric Brown
Writer, Voodoo
Attended University of Cincinatti, Hanover College, Indiana, but didn't obtain a degree. Worked in an office 1924-36, when he left to become writer, proofreader for the "Milwaukee Journal". Also started writing at this time, selling the first of over 300 short stories. Active in both science-fiction and mystery fields...
Brian Aldiss
Brian Wilson Aldiss, a British writer, anthologist, and critic, published his first book, "The Brightfount Diaries", in 1955. That same year he won his first literary award for his short story "Not For an Age." The most popular science fiction writer of the United Kingdom in the late twentieth century...
Robert A. Heinlein
Prolific science-fiction author. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, he retired, disabled, in 1934. Began writing science fiction in 1939. Winner of four Hugo Awards. Guest commentator for the 1969 Apollo 11 lunar landing. Recipient of the Grand Master Nebula Award for lifetime achievement.
John Wyndham
John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris was born in 1903. After trying many jobs including farming and law, he started writing short stories for publication in 1925. He did well in America in the 1930s, writing under various pen names and graduated to churning out the staple written diet of every red blooded American male - the detective story...
Stanislaw Lem
Writer, Solaris
Stanislaw Lem was a visionary Polish author known for Solaris. He was born on September 12, 1921, in Lwów, Poland. His father, Samuel Lem, was a wealthy laryngologist who served in the Austrian army. His mother, Sabina Woller, was a homemaker. Although he was born into a Polish-Jewish family...
John Holbrook Vance
Writer, Bad Ronald
Jack Vance is best known for his fantasy and science fiction. He won the Hugo award (given by the World Science Fiction Society) for *The Dragon Masters* (1963); both Hugo and Nebula (given by Science Fiction Writers of America) for *The Last Castle* (1966); and the World Fantasy Award for *Lyonesse: Madouc* (1990)...
William Tenn
Phil Klass was born in London in 1920. His family emmigrated to the US during the '20s. Phil grew up in New York City. He took to writing fiction during the lengthy commute to his day job at Bell Labs in New Jersey. Phil helped many young writers. 'Daniel Keyes', who wrote "Flowers for Algernon" (Charly)...
Theodore Sturgeon
Writer, Killdozer
Edward Hamilton Waldo was an American science fiction writer who published under the legal name Theodore Sturgeon - he changed his name following his mother's divorce. He was born on Staten Island, New York and sold his first short story in 1938. He is perhaps best known for the novel 'More Than Human' (1953) and his short horror story...
George R.R. Martin
George R.R. Martin is an American novelist and short-story writer in the fantasy, horror, and science fiction genres, a screenwriter, and television producer. He is best known for his international bestselling series of epic fantasy novels, A Song of Ice and Fire, which was later adapted into the HBO dramatic series Game of Thrones...
George Orwell
Born the son of an Opium Agent in Bengal, Eric Blair was educated in England (Eton 1921). The joined the British Imperial Police in Burma, serving until 1927. He then travelled around England and Europe, doing various odd jobs to support his writing. By 1935 he had adopted the 'pen-name' of 'George Orwell' and had written his first novels...
Robert J. Sawyer
Writer, Flashforward
Robert J. Sawyer, the son of John Arthur Sawyer and Virginia Kivley Peterson Sawyer, both of whom worked in the fields of economics and statistics, was born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. He has an older brother, Peter Douglas Sawyer, and a younger brother, Alan Bruce Sawyer. Rob Sawyer sold his first novel...
Stephen Baxter
Miscellaneous Crew, Invasion: Earth
John Varley
Writer, Millennium
John Varley was born in 1947 in Austin, Texas and later on won a National Merit Scholarship to Michigan State University. He originally had plans to be a scientist, but he eventually dropped out. After taking a variety of odd jobs, he decided to become a science fiction writer, and his first sale, "Picnic on Nearside," appeared in the August 1974 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction...
Michael Crichton
Michael Crichton was born in Chicago, Illinois, but grew up in Roslyn, New York. His father was a journalist and encouraged him to write and to type. Michael gave up studying English at Harvard University, having become disillusioned with the teaching standards--the final straw came when he submitted...
James Tiptree Jr.
James Tiptree, Jr., was the pseudonym used by Alice Sheldon. Born Alice Bradly in 1915, she travelled extensively around the world with her parents (a travel writer and an explorer). She married in 1934, but was divorced in 1941. At the start of WWII, she joined the Army, and was later assigned to Army Air Force Intelligence. She was to remain involved with US Intelligence for most of her life...
Roger Zelazny
Born in 1937, Roger Zelazny left his strongest mark in the Science Fiction Literature of the '60s and '70s. His first story was published in 1962, and he went on to publish more than 150 short stories and 50 books. His best works include novels "Lord of Light" (1967), "This Immortal" (1966), "Creatures of Light and Darkness" (1969)...
Edmond Hamilton
Writer, Batman
Edmond Hamilton began his writing career in the early days of pulp science fiction. His first story, "The Monster of Marmuth", appeared in Weird Tales, and was very reminiscent of H.P. Lovecraft. Soon, though, his style changed, and he focused on the "super-science" stories popularized by E. E. Smith and John Campbell...
Jack Williamson
John Stewart "Jack" Williamson was a prolific fiction writer of novels and short stories in the science-fiction genre. He replaced Robert A. Heinlein as the "Dean of Science Fiction" in 1988. His novel "Darker Than You Think" (1948) is perhaps his best known and has since been included in the Gollancz...
Lester Del Rey
Lester Del Rey was born in Clydesdale, Minnesota. His mother died shortly after his birth, leaving the boy and his older sister in the care of their father. Sensing that the children should have a mother, his father hired a woman to care for the children, and later married her. Unfortunately, the stepmother was unable to form an attachment to young Lester...
Greg Bear
Greg was born in San Diego on August 20th, 1951, to Wilma M. and Dale F. Bear. He sold his first short story at the age of fifteen to the magazine Famous Science Fiction and his first novel, Hegira, appeared in 1979. One of Bear's most famous stories is "Blood Music", which won the Nebula Award and the Hugo Award...
Gregory Benford
Gregory Benford was born in Mobile, Alabama, in 1941. He received a B.S. from the University of Oklahoma, and attended the University of California, San Diego, where he earned a Ph.D. in 1967. He spent the next four years at the Lawrence Livermore Radiation Laboratory as a postdoctoral fellow and research physicist...