The most overrated directors of all time

There are filmmakers, that for some reason get far better reviews than they deserve. They may have done one decent film but that's the film that you have probably missed because of all the garbage you were fooled to see, because of undeserving reviews, which in the end led you to never see a film by that filmmaker again.

The directors are listed from the most overrated to the least overrated.

I have gotten wonderful comments (see below) and would have liked to comment on them individually but then I have to give up my credit card number to imdb and I'm too paranoid for doing that.

I will change my commentaries on the directors, partly as an answer to the wonderful commentaries I have received and also make a list of the most underrated directors of all time, which will open up for people to criticize my favorites.

Again, I must send my love to all who have taken the time to comment on this list. Sometimes, I have been touched to tears, at least almost. You are all lovely people, even those who disagree.

i have added my list with the greatest bull....artist of all time and guess that this will be something to bite on for many.
Incidentally, I do not believe that, for instance, Goethe is overrated. Schiller most probably but not Goethe, even if he too did some kissing up to power.
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1.
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare's birthdate is assumed from his baptism on April 25. His father John was the son of a farmer who became a successful tradesman; his mother Mary Arden was gentry. He studied Latin works at Stratford Grammar School, leaving at about age 15. About this time his father suffered an unknown financial setback...
“ When it comes to being overrated, this lackey of power just cannot be beaten. He is and will always be the emperor of overratedness.
Were it not for the vanity of mankind, this man would soon have been forgotten. However, for the ruling class this man has been a tremendous help in fogging the eyes of the ruled.
To be or not to be....William Shakespeare.
To do is to be......Jean Paul Sartre
Do be do be do......Frank Sinatra ” - karlericsson
 
2.
Abbas Kiarostami
Abbas Kiarostami was born in Tehran, Iran, in 1940. He graduated from university with a degree in fine arts before starting work as a graphic designer. He then joined the Center for Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults, where he started a film section, and this started his career as a filmmaker at the age of 30...
“ Well, this is probably the most overrated director of all time. If there was ever a film by him that was not unbearable dull, then it was a film that he had copied from another far better film. A bs-artist if ever there was one. ” - karlericsson
 
3.
Guy Maddin
Guy Maddin was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, to Herdis Maddin (a hair-dresser) and Charles "Chas" Maddin (grain clerk and general manager of the Maroons, a Winnipeg hockey team). Maddin studied economics at the University of Winnipeg, working as a bank manager, house painter, and photographic archivist before becoming a film-maker...
“ Simply catastrophic. ” - karlericsson
 
4.
Wes Anderson
Wesley Wales Anderson was born in Houston, Texas. His mother, Texas Ann (Burroughs), is an archaeologist turned real estate agent, and his father, Melver Leonard Anderson, worked in advertising and PR. He has two brothers, Eric and Mel. Anderson's parents divorced when he was a young child, an event that he described as the most crucial event of his brothers and his growing up...
“ What is this??? Why did Bill Murray ever let himself get directed by this pajazzo? ” - karlericsson
 
5.
“ Mostly unbearable. ” - karlericsson
 
6.
Éric Rohmer
Admirers have always had difficulty explaining Éric Rohmer's "Je ne sais quoi." Part of the challenge stems from the fact that, despite his place in French Nouvelle Vague (i.e., New Wave), his work is unlike that of his colleagues. While this may be due to the auteur's unwillingness to conform, some have argued convincingly that...
“ The best thing he ever did was the nude shot of Arielle Dombasle in Pauline at the beach but you will probably never see it because it has been tampered with since and a computerized blanket covers everything that was special with that shot, which leaves ER totally empty-handed in the history of films. ” - karlericsson
 
7.
Joseph Losey
Director, The Servant
Belonging to an important family clan in Wisconsin, Joseph Losey studied philosophy but was always interested in theater and thus worked together with Bertolt Brecht. After directing some shorts for MGM, he made his first important film, The Boy with Green Hair, for RKO. While he was filming The Prowler in Italy he was summoned to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee...
“ Often had good stories to work with but his handling of them almost always destroyed them. Especially his bad choice of music is annoying. The man must have been tone-deaf!
Still, Time Without Pity, The Prowler, The Go-Between, King and Country are all watchable films but not because of J.L. ” - karlericsson
 
8.
“ 8 mm and Falling Down are decent films and the praise this director has gotten is not overwhelming but when I think of all the films that were destroyed because of his handling of them (especially the Batman-films he did), I think he belongs here, definitely. ” - karlericsson
 
9.
Pedro Almodóvar
Writer, Talk to Her
The most internationally acclaimed Spanish filmmaker since Luis Buñuel was born in a small town (Calzada de Calatrava) in the impoverished Spanish region of La Mancha. He arrived in Madrid in 1968, and survived by selling used items in the flea-market called El Rastro. Almodóvar couldn't study filmmaking because he didn't have the money to afford it...
“ Only for homosexuals? ” - karlericsson
 
10.
Noël Coward
Writer, Easy Virtue
Noel Coward virtually invented the concept of Englishness for the 20th century. An astounding polymath - dramatist, actor, writer, composer, lyricist, painter, and wit -- he was defined by his Englishness as much as he defined it. He was indeed the first Brit pop star, the first ambassador of "cool Britannia." Even before his 1924 drugs-and-sex scandal of The Vortex...
“ Well, more of a writer really but definitely overpraised. At best he was half-bad (or half-good if you're an optimist). Stiff upper lip b-s artist, describes him very well, I think. ” - karlericsson
 
11.
Michelangelo Antonioni
Writer, Blow-Up
Michelangelo Antonioni was born in 1912 into a middle-class family and grew up in bourgeois surroundings of the Italian province. In Bologna he studied economics and commerce while he painted and also wrote criticism for a local newspaper. In 1939 he went to Rome and worked for the journal "Cinema" studying directorship at the School of Cinema...
“ Blow-Up is a masterpiece, especially the treatment of the sounds in that magic park, but the rest this director has done is beauty in the eye of the beholder and only there. Similar upper-class fixation as with Bergman. B-s paired with technical skills describes him correctly, I think. ” - karlericsson
 
12.
Emir Kusturica
Director, Underground
A Serbian film director. Born in 1954 in Sarajevo. Graduated in film directing at the prestigious Academy of Performing Arts (FAMU) in Prague in 1978. During his studies, he was awarded several times for his short movies including Guernica (1978), which took first prize at the Student's Film Festival in Karlovy Vary...
“ Only for people who have not seen much film? Supposed to be funny?
Overpraised, overpraised, overpraised. ” - karlericsson
 
13.
Jean-Luc Godard
Director, My Life to Live
Jean-Luc Godard was born in Paris on December 3, 1930, the second of four children in a bourgeois Franco-Swiss family. His father was a doctor who owned a private clinic, and his mother came from a preeminent family of Swiss bankers. During World War II Godard became a naturalized citizen of Switzerland and attended school in Nyons (Switzerland)...
“ New Wave of intensified b-s. Some humor, I must admit, but the overwhelming praise cements him on this list. ” - karlericsson
 
14.
Robert Altman
Director, Gosford Park
Robert Altman was born on February 20th, 1925 in Kansas City, Missouri, to B.C. (an insurance salesman) and Helen Altman. He entered St. Peters Catholic school at the age six, and spent a short time at a Catholic high school. From there, he went to Rockhurst High School. It was then that he started exploring the art of exploring sound with the cheap tape recorders available at the time...
“ A very special american kind of b-s. His hallmark is bad sound and wobbly, "artsy" direction. Often saved by full frontal nude shots. ” - karlericsson
 
15.
Federico Fellini
Writer,
The women who both attracted and frightened him and an Italy dominated in his youth by Mussolini and Pope Pius XII - inspired the dreams that Fellini started recording in notebooks in the 1960s. Life and dreams were raw material for his films. His native Rimini and characters like Saraghina (the devil herself said the priests who ran his school)...
“ La Strada and Nights of Cabiria almost make me regret of putting this director on this list but then I remember Fellini Satyricon and Fellini Roma and the fantastic praise this director has gotten through the years and although he has done these two fantastic films (which, incidentally, would never have been as good without his wife in the leads), I nevertheless decide to put him here. ” - karlericsson
 
16.
Ingmar Bergman
Ernst Ingmar Bergman was born July fourteenth, 1918, the son of a priest. The film and T.V. series, The Best Intentions is biographical and shows the early marriage of his parents. The film 'Söndagsbarn' depicts a bicycle journey with his father. In the miniseries Private Confessions is the trilogy closed. Here...
“ Wild Strawberries is a wonderful film. Still I want this director high on this list. If he had been less praised, then he would not have been on this list. One truly good film is however not enough for the praise he has gotten.

Contrary to popular belief, this director was quite superficial in his psychology, which can be witnessed in almost all his films save Wild Strawberries. The prime example for his shallowness is maybe Autumn Sonata.

I cannot remember that he ever did a film which proved social consciousness. His films are about people of the upper class or upper middle class, whom he always describes as far more miserable than they ever were, especially compared to the working-class. ” - karlericsson
 
17.
François Truffaut
François began to assiduously go to the movies at 7. He was also a great reader but not a good pupil. He left school at 14 and started working. In 1947, aged 15, he founded a film club and met André Bazin, a French critic, who becomes his protector. Bazin helped the delinquent Truffaut and also when he was put in jail because he deserted the army...
“ Seemed to have been a very nice man but unfortunately overrated as far as his films are concerned. L'Argent de poche was a decent film but already The 400 Blows, although not altogether bad, was nevertheless overrated. ” - karlericsson
 
18.
Jean Renoir
Son of the famous Impressionist painter Pierre Auguste, he had a happy childhood. Pierre Renoir was his brother, and Claude Renoir was his nephew. After the end of World War I, where he won the Croix de Guerre, he moved from scriptwriting to filmmaking. He married Catherine Hessling, for whom he began to make movies; he wanted to make a star of her...
“ Curiously, his less rated films are his best films. The most overrated film of all time is otherwise "The Rules of the Game" but I like his acting in that film (damn it, I bite my hand).
Late on this list but belongs there, for sure. ” - karlericsson
 
19.
Cecil B. DeMille
His parents Henry C. DeMille and Beatrice DeMille were playwrights. His father died when he was 12, and his mother supported the family by opening a school for girls and a theatrical company. Too young to enlist in the Spanish-American War, Cecil followed his brother William C. de Mille to the New York Academy of Dramatic Arts...
“ I originally wrote "no comment" here and I agree that this was the wrong thing to do as one of my critiques pointed out. Furthermore, dear Cecil did at least one deeply touching movie "The King of Kings", which is maybe the best movie on Christ so far and should merit him not to be on this list. Still furthermore, he simply isn't so highly rated anymore. I keep him here at the bottom as a reminder for my mistake and as long as he stays here at the bottom of the list, I hope this will keep me in place. ” - karlericsson
 
20.
John Ford
Director, The Searchers
John Ford is, arguably, The Great American Director. When Orson Welles, who repeatedly screened Ford's Stagecoach as a crash course in filmmaking before helming his first film, Citizen Kane, was asked who his three favorite directors were, he answered, "John Ford, John Ford, and John Ford." Along with D.W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille...
“ Got a commentary that John Ford should be on this list and I must say that I absolutely agree.
Not that JF did not do any good films such as "The Grapes of Wrath" and "How Green Was My Valley". The point is, if he is OVERRATED or not and i think he is - just compare his tedious westerns with the ones by Sergio Leone. ” - karlericsson