Fathers of Cinema

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1.
Louis Lumière
Although no one will ever come up with a definitive answer as to who invented the cinema (probably because no one single person was responsible), Louis Lumiere has one of the strongest claims to the title - for it was he (with his brother Auguste) who invented the cinematographe: a machine that combined...
“ ..and Antoine Lumiere ” - diluyendose
 
2.
Georges Méliès
Georges Melies, a professional magician by training, first saw the new "moving pictures" in 1895. Little over a year later, Melies was filming and projecting his own creations. By accident, he discovered that he could use stop-motion photography to render trick visual effects. Melies was also the first to use techniques such as the fade-in...
 
4.
William K.L. Dickson
Cinematographer, Newark Athlete
Born in France to British parents, William Kennedy-Laurie Dickson stayed in that country until age 19, when he, his mother and sisters (their father had died sometime before) returned to Great Britain. Once there, Dickson--in an early indication of his lifelong fascination with science and mechanics--began a correspondence with Thomas A. Edison in the US...
 
5.
Émile Reynaud
Director, Pauvre Pierrot
His father was a watchmaker, his mother a schoolteacher. He was taught by his parents, and they believed he should learn whilst having fun. When his father died, him and mother both left Paris for Puy-en-Velay. He became a professor of physics and natural sciences, and taught from 1873 to 1877. During this time he invented the "praxinoscope" which is an instrument that creates optical illusions...
 
6.
Edwin S. Porter
In the late 1890s Porter worked as both a projectionist and mechanic, eventually becoming director and cameraman for the Edison Manufacturing Company. Influenced by both the "Brighton school" and the story films of Georges Méliès, Porter went on to make important shorts such as Life of an American Fireman and The Great Train Robbery...
 
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9.
Ferdinand Zecca
Was a cafe concert entertainer before Charles Pathe noticed him during the Universal Exhibition, where Zecca had been assigned to Pathe's stand. After a few daysPathe asked Zecca if he would like to work in cinematography. Zecca immediately accepted the offer and rapidly became Pathe's right hand man and head of production.
 
10.
Segundo de Chomón
Segundo de Chomón became involved in film through his wife, who was an actress in Pathé films. In 1902 he became a concessionary for Pathé in Barcelona, distributing its product in Spanish-speaking countries and managing a factory for the coloring of Pathé films. He began shooting footage of Spanish locations for the company...
 
11.
Robert W. Paul
Robert Paul was an electrician and scientific instrument maker, with offices at Hatton Garden in London. He was approached by two Greek businessmen who had obtained an Edison kinetoscope (a slot machine that ran film in a continuous loop, that the customer viewed through an eyepiece). It should be noted that all the early Thomas A. Edison films were made for these machines--they were not projected...
 
12.
George Albert Smith
Along with his better-known French counterpart Georges Méliès George Albert Smith was one of the first filmmakers to explore fictional and fantastic themes, often using surprisingly sophisticated special effects. His background was ideal--an established portrait photographer, he also had a long-standing interest in show business...
 
13.
Cecil M. Hepworth
Cinematographer, Alice in Wonderland
Born in London, England, in 1874, Cecil Hepworth was one of the founders of the British film industry, directing and producing many films from 1898 into the late 1920s. Developing an early interest in films from following his father on lecture tours about the magic-lantern, he patented several photographic inventions and wrote possibly the earliest handbook on the film medium...
 
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15.
Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince
Le Prince is considered the pioneer of the motion picture. His father was an intimate friend of Louis Daguerre (1787-1851), the famous pioneer of photography, who gave his son some early lessons in the art. In 1875 he saw a series of photographs taken by Eadweard Muybridge at Palo Alto, California. Le Prince was attracted to the idea of producing a series of photographs i.e...
 
16.
D.W. Griffith
David Wark Griffith was born in rural Kentucky to Jacob "Roaring Jake" Griffith, a former Confederate Army colonel and Civil War hero. Young Griffith grew up with his father's romantic war stories and melodramatic nineteenth-century literature that were to eventually mold his black-and-white view of human existence and history...
 
18.
J. Stuart Blackton
J. Stuart Blackton came to the US with his family from Sheffield, England, in 1885 at age 10, settling in New York. He became friends with Albert E. Smith - who later became his business partner and headed Vitagraph Studios - in 1894 and they started a short-lived vaudeville act together. Blackton went to work as a reporter for the "New York Evening World" newspaper...
 
19.
Eadweard Muybridge
Eadweard Muybridge's great breakthrough came in 1872 when he was hired by wealthy American businessman Leland Stanford, for whom Stanford University is named. Stanford was interested in whether horses lifted all legs off the ground at once during trotting and Muybridge was engaged to take photographs to settle the point...
 
20.
Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince
Le Prince is considered the pioneer of the motion picture. His father was an intimate friend of Louis Daguerre (1787-1851), the famous pioneer of photography, who gave his son some early lessons in the art. In 1875 he saw a series of photographs taken by Eadweard Muybridge at Palo Alto, California. Le Prince was attracted to the idea of producing a series of photographs i.e...