Photographers

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1.
Sven Nykvist
Sven Nykvist was considered by many in the industry to be one of the world's greatest cinematographers. During his long career that spanned almost half a century, Nyvist perfected the art of cinematography to its most simple attributes, and he helped give the films he had worked on the simplest and most natural look imaginable...
 
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Freddie Francis
Cinematographer, The Elephant Man
During his last years at school he spent most of his time writing a thesis on 'the future of film' On leaving school he joined Gaumont British Studios at Lime Grove as an apprentice to a stills photographer for a year. He claimed this taught him more about the art of photography than any other form of training could...
 
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Vittorio Storaro
Cinematographer, Apocalypse Now
Vittorio Storaro, the award-winning cinematographer who won Oscars for "Apocalypse Now", "Reds" and "The Last Emperor". He was born on June 24, 1940 in Rome, where his father was a projectionist at the Lux Film Studio. At the age of 11, he began studying photography at a technical school...
 
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Karl Freund
Cinematographer, I Love Lucy
Karl Freund, an innovative director of photography responsible for development of the three-camera system used to shoot television situation comedies, was born on January 16, 1890, in the Bohemian city of Koeniginhof, then part of the Austria-Hungarian Empire (now known as Dvur Kralove in the Czech Republic)...
 
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Gregg Toland
Cinematographer, Citizen Kane
Born in Illinois in 1904, the only child of Jennie and Frank Toland, Gregg and his mother moved to California several years after his parents divorced in 1910. Through Jennie's work as a housekeeper for several people in the movie business, Gregg may had gotten a $12-a-week job at age 15 as an office boy at William Fox Studios...
 
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Freddie Young
Cinematographer, Lawrence of Arabia
Cinematographer with a long and distinguished career crowned with Oscars for three consecutive films directed by David Lean between 1962-1970. Awarded OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) in 1970.
 
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Leon Shamroy
Cinematographer, Planet of the Apes
 
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Jack Cardiff
Almost universally considered one of the greatest cinematographers of all time, Jack Cardiff was also a notable director. He described his childhood as very happy and his parents as quite loving. They performed in music hall as comedians, so he grew up with the fun that came with their theatrical life in pantomime and vaudeville...
 
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Vadim Yusov
Cinematographer, Solaris
 
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Ted Moore
Cinematographer, Goldfinger
 
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Chris Menges
Cinematographer, The Reader
 
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Albert Yavuryan
Cinematographer, Ashug-Karibi
 
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Douglas Slocombe
Cinematographer, Raiders of the Lost Ark
London-born Douglas Slocombe has long been regarded as one of the film industry's premiere cinematographers, but he began his career as a photojournalist for Life magazine and the Paris-Match newspaper before World War II. During the war he became a newsreel cameraman, and at war's end he went to work for Ealing Studios as a camera operator...
 
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John F. Seitz
Cinematographer, Sunset Blvd.
Distinguished veteran cinematographer John F. Seitz had eighteen patents for various photographic processes to his name. These included illuminating devices, processes for making dissolves and the matte shot, which he perfected during filming of Rex Ingram's Trifling Women. Seitz started with Essanay in Chicago...
 
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Robert Burks
Cinematographer, Rear Window
The favorite cinematographer of famous director Alfred Hitchcock began working at Warner Bros. when he was 19 years old. He climbed his way up from camera operator to assistant camera man and eventually took over the Special Photographic Effects unit at Warners on Stage 5 in 1944. He became an expert in forced perspective techniques which were widely in use at the time as cost-saving measures...
 
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Robert Surtees
Cinematographer, The Graduate
Robert L. Surtees began his working life as a portrait photographer and retoucher, before becoming camera assistant at Universal in 1927. He spent a lengthy apprenticeship (15 years) working under such experienced cinematographers as Hal Mohr, Joseph Ruttenberg and Gregg Toland. Between 1929 and 1930...
 
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Russell Metty
Cinematographer, Spartacus
Cinematographer Russell Metty, a superb craftsman who worked with such top directors as John Huston, Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg and Orson Welles, was born in Los Angeles on Septmeber 20, 1906. Entering the movie industry as a lab assistant, he apprenticed as an assistant cameraman and graduated to lighting cameraman at RKO Radio Pictures in 1935...
 
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John Alcott
Cinematographer, The Shining
John Alcott, the Oscar-winning cinematographer best known for his collaboration with director Stanley Kubrick, was born in 1931, in Isleworth, England, the son of movie executive Arthur Alcott, who would become the production controller at Gainsborough Studios during the 1940s. Alcott began his film career as a clapper boy...
 
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Geoffrey Unsworth
Cinematographer, 2001: A Space Odyssey
Goeffrey Unsworth was one of the great cinematographers of the 20th Century, the winner of two Oscars, five BAFTA awards, and three awards from the British Society of Cinematographers for his work as a director of photography. Born in 1914 in Lancashire, England, Unsworth started in the industry in 1932 at Gaumont-British before joining Technicolor in 1937...
 
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Harry Stradling Sr.
Cinematographer, My Fair Lady
Multi-Academy Award-nominated cinematographer (13 in all), Harry Stradling was unique in that he established his reputation both in America and in Europe. He was the nephew of Mary Pickford's cameraman Walter Stradling, who provided the connections for his first job in Hollywood. Walter died in 1918 and Harry went on to serve his apprenticeship...
 
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Joseph Ruttenberg
Cinematographer, The Philadelphia Story
Four-time Oscar-winning cinematographer Joseph Ruttenberg was born in St. Petersburg, Russia. In 1893, at the age of four, his family moved to the United States, eventually settling in Boston. After schooling, he got his first job in 1907 working as a newsboy and personal runner for William Randolph Hearst's 'Boston American'...
 
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Joseph MacDonald
Cinematographer, The Sand Pebbles
Versatile Mexico City-born cinematographer, who worked equally well with black-and-white and with colour film, and in every genre from film noir, to westerns, to musicals. Joe MacDonald served a lengthy apprenticeship, starting as assistant cameraman in the early 1920's, finally graduating to first camera operator by the beginning of the following decade...
 
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Robert Krasker
Cinematographer, The Third Man
A somewhat underrated figure in cinematographic history, Australian-born Robert Krasker handled some of the most memorable films made in Britain after the Second World War. In his youth, he attended art classes in Paris and studied photography at the Photohaendler Schule in Dresden. He briefly worked for Paramount in Paris...
 
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Oswald Morris
Cinematographer, Lolita
Oscar-winning cinematography Oswald Morris was one of the most outstanding directors of photography of the 20th Century, making his reputation by expanding the parameters of color cinematography. Born in November 1915 in Hillingdon, Middlesex, England, a month short of his 17th birthday, he became a factotum and clapper boy at Wembley Studios...
 
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John W. Brown
Cinematographer, Bucking Broadway
 
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Willard Van Enger
Special Effects, Casablanca
 
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Charles Van Enger
Cinematographer, Lassie
 
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Virgil Miller
Cinematographer, You Bet Your Life
 
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John Toll
Cinematographer, Braveheart
John Toll is an American cinematographer. His filmography spans a wide variety of genres, including epic period drama, comedy, science fiction, and contemporary drama. He won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography in both 1994 and 1995 for Legends of the Fall and Braveheart respectively. He has collaborated with several noteworthy directors...
 
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Néstor Almendros
Cinematographer, Kramer vs. Kramer
One of the highest appraised contemporary cinematographers. He was born in Spain but moved to Cuba by age 18 to join his exiled anti-Franco father. In Havana, he founded a cineclub and wrote film reviews. Then, he went on to study in Rome at the Centro Sperimentale. He directed six shorts in Cuba and two in New York...
 
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Janusz Kaminski
Cinematographer, Saving Private Ryan
Janusz Kaminski is a Polish cinematographer and film director. He has established a partnership with Steven Spielberg, working as a cinematographer on his movies since 1993. He won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work on Schindler's List (1993) and Saving Private Ryan (1998). His other film's as an cinematographer includes Amistad (1997)...
 
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Roger Deakins
Cinematographer, The Shawshank Redemption
Roger Deakins is an English cinematographer best known for his work on the films of the Coen brothers, Sam Mendes, and Denis Villeneuve. He is a member of both the American and British Society of Cinematographers, and received thirteen nominations for the Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Deakins' first feature film in America as cinematographer was Mountains of the Moon (1990)...
 
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Vilmos Zsigmond
Cinematographer, The Deer Hunter
Along with László Kovács, a fellow student who fled Hungary in 1956, Zsigmond rose to prominence in the 1970s. He is known for his use of natural light and vivid use of color on features such as The Long Goodbye and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.
 
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Conrad L. Hall
Cinematographer, American Beauty
Connie's career got its major boost when Leslie Stevens hired him as Director of Photography for his first TV series, "Stoney Burke", in 1962, and then he became the major DP for the "Outer Limits", from 1963-64, along with his camera operator, Bill Fraker, both of whom moved on to brilliant film careers.
 
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Jan de Bont
Cinematographer, Die Hard
Jan de Bont was born in the Netherlands to a Roman Catholic Dutch family on the 22 of October 1943. He has always had a creative mind and good mentality for camera techniques and soon got into film as a popular cinematographer. He worked on a huge number of films before finding himself on the production of the film Speed...
 
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Ernest Haller
Cinematographer, Gone with the Wind
Distinguished American cinematographer Ernest Haller started in the industry in 1914 as an actor with Biograph after leaving his first job as a bank clerk. Within one year he discovered his true calling: being on the other side of the camera. By 1920, he had become a full director of photography and would go on to handle prestige pictures ...
 
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Lee Garmes
Cinematographer, Scarface
One of the most innovative of pioneer cameramen, Lee Garmes started his career on the East Coast with the New York Motion Picture Company, but was soon persuaded by the director Thomas H. Ince to join him in Hollywood. Garmes quickly climbed his way up the ladder, from painter's assistant to prop boy (future director Henry Hathaway shared the same duties at 'Inceville')...
 
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Gordon Willis
Cinematographer, The Godfather
Gordon Willis was an American cinematographer. He is best known for his work on Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather series as well as Woody Allen's Annie Hall (1977) and Manhattan (1979). His work in the first two Godfather films turned out to be groundbreaking in its use of low-light photography and underexposed film...
 
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Robert Burks
Cinematographer, Rear Window
The favorite cinematographer of famous director Alfred Hitchcock began working at Warner Bros. when he was 19 years old. He climbed his way up from camera operator to assistant camera man and eventually took over the Special Photographic Effects unit at Warners on Stage 5 in 1944. He became an expert in forced perspective techniques which were widely in use at the time as cost-saving measures...
 
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James Wong Howe
Cinematographer, The Thin Man
Master cinematographer James Wong Howe, whose career stretched from silent pictures through the mid-'70s, was born Wong Tung Jim in Canton (now Guangzhou), China, on August 28, 1899, the son of Wong How. His father emigrated to America the year James was born, settling in Pasco, Washington, where he worked for the Northern Pacific Railroad...
 
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Haskell Wexler
Two-time Academy Award-winning cinematographer Haskell Wexler was adjudged one of the ten most influential cinematographers in movie history, according to an International Cinematographers Guild survey of its membership. He won his Oscars in both black & white and color, for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) and Bound for Glory (1976)...
 
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Charles Rosher
Cinematographer, Sunrise
Among the foremost technical innovators in his field, a charter member of the American Society of Cinematographers, English-born Charles Rosher had initially aimed for a diplomatic career. Fortunately, he chose a different career option and attended lessons in photography at the London Polytechnic in Regent Street...
 
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Franz Planer
Cinematographer, Breakfast at Tiffany's
Descended from a wealthy family of landowners in what was then Austria-Hungary, Franz Planer understood the importance of photography as an art form early in his life. He first stood behind the camera as a portrait photographer, working out of Vienna from 1910. He soon branched out, filming newsreels in Paris and...
 
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Kazuo Miyagawa
Cinematographer, Rashômon
 
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Takao Saitô
Cinematographer, Ran
 
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Shôji Ueda
Cinematographer, Ran
 
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Asakazu Nakai
Cinematographer, Seven Samurai
 
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Takashi Kawamata
Cinematographer, Kuroi ame
 
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Boris Kaufman
Cinematographer, 12 Angry Men
Boris Kaufman, the Oscar-winning cinematographer who shot Jean Vigo's oeuvre and helped introduce a neo-realistic style into American films, was born on August 24, 1897, in Bialystok, Poland, then part of the Russian Empire. The youngest son of librarians, the Soviet directors Denis Kaufman (a.k.a...
 
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Sam Leavitt
Cinematographer, Anatomy of a Murder
 
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Bruno Mondi
Cinematographer, Sissi
Director of Photography, Bruno Mondi, shot over 100 movies. He created great silent movies in the 20ties, revue films in the 30s, propaganda films in Nazi Germany of the 40s, anti-fascist films in the Soviet zone of Germany in the 50s and entertainment films in West Germany in the 60s. In 1918 he started his career as a trainee at the Bioskop-Film in Berlin...
 
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Russell Harlan
Cinematographer, To Kill a Mockingbird
Born Russell September 16, 1903 in Los Angeles, California to Frank and Bertha Harlan, who hailed from Iowa and Missouri. Russell was raised in Los Angeles along with his younger brother Richard (b. 1911). His paternal grandmother Sarah J. Harlan also lived with the family. Harlan started in the film industry as an actor and stuntman...
 
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Claude Renoir
Cinematographer, The Spy Who Loved Me
Apprenticed under noted cinematographers Christian Matras and Boris Kaufman and shot or co-shot several films directed by his uncle, Jean Renoir. Renoir did the photography for one of his uncle's cinematic apogees, _Une partie de campagne (1936)_ and was the camera operator for the tragic, ebullient master text La Grande Illusion...
 
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Miroslav Ondrícek
Cinematographer, Amadeus
 
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Ron Fricke
Cinematographer, Baraka
 
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Ted D. McCord
Cinematographer, The Sound of Music
Ted McCord learned his craft 'on the job' as a camera assistant at the Hobart Bosworth Productions Company in 1917. His first credited film as fully-fledged cinematographer was Sacred and Profane Love, billing himself as 'T.D.McCord'. During the 20's, he worked on a wide variety of subjects, from romantic comedy (Irene) to westerns (The Code of the Scarlet) to melodrama (The Crash)...
 
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Roland Totheroh
Cinematographer, Modern Times
Rollie Totheroh worked as cinematographer on Charles Chaplin's movies for over 30 years, right from the earliest shorts in 1915 to Monsieur Verdoux, including all of Chaplin's masterpieces: The Kid, The Gold Rush, City Lights, Modern Times and The Great Dictator. Totheroh was the man with whom Chaplin had the longest working relationship, other than his brother Syd Chaplin.
 
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Fritz Arno Wagner
Cinematographer, M
Regarded as one of the foremost exponents of cinematic expressionism in the 1920's, Fritz Arno Wagner was trained at the Ecole de Beaux Arts in Paris and began in the film industry working for Pathé Freres in 1910. Within just two years, he was promoted to head Pathé's offices in Vienna, and, subsequently...
 
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Bert Glennon
Cinematographer, Stagecoach
While attending Stanford University in 1912, Bert Glennon was hired as an assistant cameraman, and, upon graduation, went into the film business full-time. Becoming a director of photography in 1916, Glennon became one of the industry's most respected craftsmen and worked often for such perfectionist directors as John Ford and Cecil B. DeMille...
 
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Charles Lang
Cinematographer, Some Like It Hot
One of the outstanding cinematographers of Hollywood's Golden Age, Lang spent most of his career at Paramount (1929-1952), where he contributed to the studio's well-earned reputation for visual style. Lang was educated at Lincoln High School in L.A., then proceeded to the University of Southern California to study law...
 
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James M. Muro
Camera and Electrical Department, Titanic
 
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Robert Richardson
Cinematographer, Inglourious Basterds
Robert Richardson an American cinematographer. He is best known for work with Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorsese, and Oliver Stone. He has won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography three times, for his work on JFK (1991), The Aviator (2004), and Hugo (2011). He is one of three living persons who won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography three times...
“ the Aviator ” - quietgiant2
 
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Henri Alekan
Cinematographer, Roman Holiday
 
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Bruno Nuytten
Cinematographer, Jean de Florette
Bruno Nuytten is one of the most successful French cinematographers notable for his many collaborations with outstanding filmmakers. He was twice awarded the César for Best Cinematography: Barocco and So Long, Stooge. Later he started to direct and is best known for his masterpiece Camille Claudel starring Isabelle Adjani in one of her most acclaimed performances...
 
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Armand Thirard
Cinematographer, Diabolique
 
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Eugen Schüfftan
Cinematographer, The Hustler
Eugen Schüfftan moved from his motherland, Germany, to France in 1933 to escape the rising Nazi movement. He moved to the US in 1940 and became a member of Local 644, the East Coast cinematographers chapter of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE). He invented the Schüfftan...
 
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Arthur Edeson
Cinematographer, Casablanca
Arthur Edeson is an American cinematographer who was a pioneer of his craft. His career spanned four decades and encompassed many films now regarded as classics. Born in New York in 1891, Edeson first worked as a still photographer. In 1911 he entered the movie business at Eclair Studios, a production unit based in Fort Lee...
 
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Luigi Kuveiller
Cinematographer, Deep Red
 
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Joseph A. Valentine
Cinematographer, Rope
 
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Arthur E. Arling
Cinematographer, Pillow Talk
 
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Henry Sharp
Cinematographer, Duck Soup
 
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Arthur C. Miller
Cinematographer, How Green Was My Valley
Arthur was known as one of Hollywood's most accomplished lighting cameramen, a master at black and white cinematography. Miller began his career at 13, serving as an assistant to cinematographer Fred J. Balshofer. (They co-authored a book entitled "Two Reels and a Crank" in 1967.) Miller photographed the serial "The Perils of Pauline" in 1914...
 
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Rudolph Maté
One of the most respected cinematographers in the industry, Polish-born Rudolph Mate entered the film business after his graduation from the University of Budapest. He worked in Hungary as an assistant cameraman for Alexander Korda and later worked throughout Europe with noted cameraman Karl Freund...
 
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Lajos Koltai
Cinematographer, Malèna
 
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