They played in silent also

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1.
Olga Baclanova
Actress, Freaks
Born Olga Vladimirovna Baklanova, one of six children of Vladimir Baklanoff and his wife Alexandra, later billed as the Russian Tigress in her early talking films, was born August 19, 1893. She graduated from the Cherniavsky Institute in Moscow prior to her selection in 1912 at age 19 to apprentice at the Moscow Art Theatre...
 
3.
Jobyna Ralston
Actress, Wings
Curly-locked, cherubic knockabout comedienne of the silent cinema. Her mother, portrait photographer Mrs. Kemp Raulston, named her after her favorite actress, Jobyna Howland. She harbored ambitions for her daughter to achieve similar fame and trained her to that end. After a failed teenage marriage to a local farmer...
 
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Arline Pretty
Arline Pretty (her actual name) had experience on stage, playing everything from juvenile leads to Shakespeare, before making her film debut in 1913. She freelanced for different studios and worked in all genres, but she found success doing serials for Vitagraph and Pathe. She worked steadily until the coming of sound...
 
13.
Tom Ricketts
Born in London, England, in 1853, prolific actor/director (300+ credits) Tom Ricketts is mostly forgotten today, but his chief claim to fame is that he directed the first motion picture shot in Hollywood. Ricketts began his show-business career as an actor on the London stage, and gained a reputation as one of the best Shakespearean actors of his day...
 
15.
Gertrude Claire
Actress, The Coward
Claire made her stage debut at 16 and later played on the stage in New York with John Drew, Edwin Booth and Richard Mansfield. At one time, she managed her own stock company in Boston.
 
17.
William Collier Jr.
Buster Collier was born Charles F. Gall Jr. in New York and got his show-business start at the age of seven, his mother being an actress and his father being a theater manager. His parents later divorced and his mother married actor William Collier Sr., who adopted the boy and gave him his new name, William Collier Jr....
 
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20.
Lafe McKee
Actor, Blue Steel
Lafe McKee began working in Hollywood around 1913. He usually played the likeable father of the heroine, the distressed businessman, or the ranch owner on the verge of losing his homestead or cattle to the villains. The majority of his films were westerns and he supported such actors as Gary Cooper, John Wayne, Gene Autry, Tim McCoy, Tom Tyler, and others.
 
24.
Kathleen Kirkham
Starting her career in stock in Wisconsin, Kirkham trained in dramatic schools before acting on the screen. Kirkham often played the vamp in films and also played mother roles to women who were older than she was. She played several roles as the "woman you loved to hate," roles she could never overcome...
 
25.
Vera Sisson
Vera Sisson was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on July 31, 1891. She began her career in 1913 when she appeared in her first film entitled, The Helping Hand when she was 22 years old. Unfortunately, Vera never rose much beyond a character actress. By the time she made Love 'Em and Leave 'Em, she had participated in eighteen films. On August 6, 1954, at the age of 63, Vera died of a barbiturate overdose.
 
29.
Milburn Morante
Milburn Morante (often alternatively credited as 'Moranti') began as a turn-of-the-century vaudevillian, part of a family trio calling themselves 'The Three Morantes'. After moving from San Francisco to L.A., he gravitated towards the film industry by 1913, initially with Keystone-Triangle, and, later...
 
30.
Billy Franey
William 'Billy' Franey was a leading comic character actor of dishevelled appearance and fuzzy moustache, usually in a suit a couple of sizes too big. His screen career began around 1913, with leads in the 'Joker' comedy series released by Universal. He was co-starred with Louise Fazenda (until her departure for Keystone in 1915) and...
 
31.
Jay Wilsey
Wilbert Jay Wilsey was born in Clark County, Missouri, in 1896. He learned to ride a horse at a very young age, and when he got older he began appearing on the rodeo circuit. In 1924 he found himself in Hollywood and, hearing that producers were looking for good horsemen for western movies, went looking for work and wound up under contract to producer Lester F. Scott Jr. and his Action Pictures...
 
32.
Jack Perrin
Jack Perrin was born in Three Rivers, MI, on July 25, 1896. His father, a real estate investor, had an eye on the burgeoning prospects in Los Angeles and moved his family there when Perrin was about four. Jack literally grew up witnessing the birth of the film industry, which exploded there in 1913...
 
36.
Slim Whitaker
American cowboy and actor Slim Whitaker was working the rodeo circuit at age 17, eventually becoming a cowhand on the Chowchilla Ranch in central California. In 1912 he was hired as a riding extra and stunt man by Gilbert M. 'Broncho Billy' Anderson for westerns being filmed in Niles Canyon, CA. During the silent era his peers were Hal Taliaferro...
 
40.
George Meeker
This durable co-star-turned-character man had the steely eyes and overall slickness of somebody never to trust...and for good reason. For over two decades George Meeker fit the bill as the guy you loved to hate in movies. Frequently the spineless third wheel of a romantic triangle, he always lost the woman in the deal...
 
41.
Conway Tearle
This West Point-educated actor was a tall, dark and handsome American co-star who romanced some of the most illustrious femme stars ever to appear on the silent silver screen. Conway Tearle was born in New York City on May 17, 1878 to a family of entertainers. Christened Frederick Levy, his father, Jules...
 
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43.
Anita Louise
An actress from the age of 6, Anita appeared with Walter Hampden in the Broadway production of Peter Ibbetson. As a juvenile actor, Anita used the name Louise Fremault and made her film debut at 9 in the film The Sixth Commandment. She continued to make films as a child actor, and in 1929, Anita dropped her "Fremault" surname...
 
44.
Richard Talmadge
He first came to the USA as a boy member of the famed acrobats, the Mazetti Troupe, that had been engaged by Barnum & Bailey Circus. Richard began in films, supposedly, as a stunt double for Doug Fairbanks, Sr., then graduated to films under his own name.
 
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Charles Morton
Actor, Four Sons
Handsome, athletic actor whose career started in the late silent era as a leading man and continued into sound features and finally television. Born in Illinois, Morton spent his adolescence in Madison, Wisconsin; receiving his education at Madison High School and the University of Wisconsin. He made his first stage appearance at the age of seven and later appeared in vaudeville...
 
47.
Paul Robeson
Soundtrack, Pride
This handsome, eloquent and highly charismatic actor became one of the foremost interpreters of Eugene O'Neill's plays and one of the most treasured names in song during the first half of the twentieth century. He also courted disdain and public controversy for most of his career as a staunch Cold War-era advocate for human rights...
 
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50.
David Rollins
Extremely handsome, juvenile lead of the silent era David Rollins was discovered as an extra and given a contract with Fox Films in 1927. He worked mostly in light comedies, frequently paired with Sue Carol (the future wife of Alan Ladd). While under contract to Fox he worked with many great directors just beginning their careers...
 
51.
Polly Moran
Actress, Adam's Rib
She was one rowdy, no-holds-barred entertainer. Comedienne Polly Moran was considered second only to perhaps Louise Fazenda as Mack Sennett's funniest lady during her silent-era heyday. Born in 1883, Polly was made for vaudeville, touring all over the world, notably Europe. Sennett snapped her up...
 
52.
Johnny Mack Brown
Actor, Coquette
An All-American halfback while attending the University of Alabama, Johnny Mack Brown chose the silver screen over the green grass of the football field when he graduated. Signed to a contract with MGM in 1926, Brown debuted in Slide, Kelly, Slide with William Haines in a film about - baseball. This was followed by The Bugle Call...
 
56.
Rin Tin Tin
The first 'Rin Tin Tin', who along with his heirs starred in numerous films and television series, was discovered during World War I, September 15, 1918, by US Air Corporal Lee Duncan and his battalion in Lorraine, France. At a bombed out dog kennel, Duncan found a mother Shepherd Dog and her scrawny litter of five pups...
 
58.
Reed Howes
American silent-era leading man who became a familiar heavy in B-Westerns of the talkie period. Born Hermon (not Herman) Reed Howes in Washington, D.C., in 1900, he served as an apprentice seaman in the U.S. Navy during the last year of the First World War. After the war he graduated from the University of Utah and attended Harvard Graduate School...
 
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Monty Banks
Monty Banks was a short, stocky but somehow debonair Italian-born comic actor, later also writer and director. In the US from 1914, he first appeared on stage in musical comedy and cabaret. By 1917 he was working as a dancer in New York's Dominguez Cafe. After this he turned to films, acting and doing stunt work at Keystone...
 
62.
Roy D'Arcy
Roy D'Arcy was born Roy Giusti in San Francisco in 1894 but educated in Europe. For a while he traveled with a band of gypsies throughout the Continent, but left to study art and painting in Paris. After several years of traveling and various business ventures in South America and Asia he returned to the US and decided to become involved in the theater...
 
64.
Richard 'Skeets' Gallagher
Former vaudeville entertainer who played light roles in Hollywood films from the mid-1920s through early 50s.
 
65.
Edward Connelly
American character actor of silent films, Edward Connelly, a native New Yorker, was a newspaperman before he became an actor, being a reporter for the New York Sunl. At 25 he joined a theatrical stock company in Kansas City and appeared subsequently on Broadway in such plays as "Shore Acres," "The Belle...
 
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Joseph A. Burke
Soundtrack, Insidious
Songwriter ("Tip Toe Through the Tulips", "Moon Over Miami", "Rambling Rose"), actor, composer and pianist, educated at the University of Pennsylvania. He then joined the staff of a New York publishing firm, and in 1929 he went to Hollywood. Joining ASCAP in 1920, he collaborated musically with Al Dubin...
 
70.
Baby Peggy
Silent moppet star Jackie Coogan, immortalized as Charles Chaplin's The Kid, had only one screen rival during the early 1920s, and that was none other than Baby Peggy. She was "discovered" while visiting the Century Studios lot on Sunset Boulevard with her mother when she was a mere 19-months-old...
 
71.
Gladys Hulette
The daughter of an opera star turned actress, Gladys Hulette began her career as a three-year old on the stage. On Broadway from 1906, she played juvenile leads in "The Kreutzer Sonata" and "A Doll's House". She was also Tyltyl in "The Blue Bird". A genuine pioneer of the movies, Gladys first starred on screen in Carl Laemmle's one-reel IMP production of Hiawatha...
 
74.
Robert Edeson
A noted stage actor at the turn of the 20th century, Robert Edeson began his film career working with Cecil B. DeMille on The Call of the North, then moved on to Vitagraph where he remained for the rest of the teens. In the 1920s he returned to work for De Mille, playing the man-of-the-world type roles. Married to actress Mary Newcomb, Edeson died of heart failure.
 
76.
June Collyer
June Collyer was born Dorothea Heermance in New York City on August 19, 1906. She began her career in the film East Side, West Side. After making the successful change to the sound era, June continued to work, something some of her counterparts couldn't do. She appeared on the silver screen until her last meaningful film...
 
78.
Walter Pidgeon
Walter Pidgeon, a handsome, tall and dark-haired man, began his career studying voice at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. He then did theater, mainly stage musicals. He went to Hollywood in the early 1920s, where he made silent films, including Mannequin and Sumuru. When talkies arrived...
 
79.
Ward Crane
American actor of silent films. A native of Albany, New York, the son of a railroad engineer, he began a career in government, serving as confidential stenographer and then secretary to Governor William Sulzer of New York. Sulzer's impeachment and removal from office left Crane without a job, and he obtained a commission in the U.S...
 
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Maurice Mariaud
Director, Os Faroleiros
Maurice Mariaud started working for Gaumont, France, in 1908 as an actor, and then directed 44 short fiction films for Gaumont, plus some episodes of film serials. Two uncredited works in that period are _Amour qui sauve, L' (1912)_ and Au pays des lions. In 1918, he worked in Portugal, returning to France to direct the major opus drama Tristan and Isolde...
 
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Olive Tell
Olive Tell was born in New York City sometime in 1894. She appeared in her first film when she was 23 years old in Her Sister. Largely a character actress, Olive did appear in few films when compared to her contemporaries. Olive was one of a few character actresses to successfully make the transition form the silent to the sound era...
 
99.
Maurice Escande
The name of Maurice Escande is inextricably linked to the Comédie-Française, the oldest and most illustrious theatre company of France. He indeed belonged to the troupe - with only a few interruptions - from 1918 to 1970, rose through the ranks from "pensionnaire" (paid actor) to "sociétaire" (regular member) to chief administrator between 1960 and 1970...