Most Memorable Supporting and Bit Players -- Male (Golden Age Hollywood)

Here is a list of supporting and bit players -- fine character actors who enhance every movie they appear in. You may not know their names, but you sure know their faces! Some of them even starred in movies once in a while.

Time period: Hollywood Golden Age.

(Additions to the list are most welcome, though I must stress that I include only those actors whom I actually recognize when I see them on screen.)
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1.
“ He was in "His Girl Friday." ” - lora-31
 
2.
“ He was one of henchmen who harassed Cary Grant in North by Northwest. ” - lora-31
 
4.
Adolphe Menjou
The words "suave" and "debonair" became synonymous with the name Adolphe Menjou in Hollywood, both on- and off-camera. The epitome of knavish, continental charm and sartorial opulence, Menjou, complete with trademark waxy black mustache, evolved into one of Hollywood's most distinguished of artists and fashion plates...
“ "Morocco," "State of the Union," "Paths of Glory," "Stage Door," "cafe Metropole"... I confess, I do not find him very believable as a hero lover, but in supporting roles he is very good. ” - lora-31
 
5.
Akim Tamiroff
Though born in Russia and having a Russian-sounding name, Akim Tamiroff is actually of Armenian descent. At 19 he decided to pursue acting as a career and was chosen from among 500 applicants to the Moscow Art Theater School. There he studied under the great Konstantin Stanislavski, and launched a stage career...
“ As one listorian put it, "he could be funny and menacing in one and the same scene." Just wonderful. ” - lora-31
 
6.
Alan Hale
Alan Hale decided on a film career after his attempt at becoming an opera singer didn't pan out. He quickly became much in demand as a supporting actor, starred in several films for Cecil B. DeMille and directed others for him. With the advent of sound Hale played leads in a few films, but soon settled down into a career as one of the busiest character actors in the business...
 
8.
Alan Mowbray
Alan Mowbray, the American film actor who was one of the founding members of the Screen Actors Guild, was born Ernest Allen on August 18, 1896, in London, England, to a non-theatrical family. He served in the British army during World War I and received the Military Medal and the French Croix De Guerre for bravery in action...
 
9.
Alan Napier
Actor, Batman
Alan Napier was born on January 7, 1903 in King Norton, Worcestershire, England. Tall, distinguished-looking English character actor with aristocratic bearing and precisely modulated voice. A cousin of the former British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, he studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and spent his formative years as an actor with Oxford Repertory and...
 
10.
Albert Dekker
A stage actor from 1927, Albert Dekker was an established Broadway star when he made his film debut ten years later. Tall and with rugged good looks, he often played aggressive character roles, a prime example being his double-crossing gang leader in the classic The Killers. From 1944-46 he served a term in the California legislature representing the Hollywood district...
 
13.
Alfonso Bedoya
Mexican character actor who achieved his greatest success in U.S. films. He was born in a tiny village in Mexico of Yaqui heritage and he had a nomadic upbringing, living in numerous places throughout the country including, for a time, Mexico City. He received a private education in Houston, Texas as a teenager...
“ "Badges? We ain't got no badges. We don't need no badges. I don't have to show you any stinking badges." Cracks me up every time. ("The Treasure of the Sierra Madre," of course, in case someone does not know.) ” - lora-31
 
14.
Allen Jenkins
Former stage actor Allen Jenkins became a Warner contract player in the early 30s. Mostly he played supporting parts, the hero's side-kick, e.g. for James Cagney.
 
15.
Allyn Joslyn
Allyn Joslyn, the son of a Pennsylvania mining engineer, made his stage debut at 17. He was soon appearing regularly in Broadway productions, and headed for Hollywood in 1936, making his debut in They Won't Forget. His nervous, at times dyspeptic demeanor and somewhat aristocratic looks fit in with the pompous...
 
16.
Andy Devine
Rotund comic character actor of American films. Born Andrew Vabre Devine in Flagstaff, Arizona, the later-to-be Rotund comic character actor was raised in nearby Kingman, Arizona, the son of Irish-American hotel operator Thomas Devine and his wife Amy. Devine was an able athlete as a student and actually played semi-pro football under a phony name (Jeremiah Schwartz...
 
18.
Anthony Quinn
Anthony Quinn was born Antonio Rudolfo Oaxaca Quinn on April 21, 1915, in Chihuahua, Mexico, to Manuela (Oaxaca) and Francisco Quinn, who became an assistant cameraman at a Los Angeles (CA) film studio. His paternal grandfather was Irish, and the rest of his family was Mexican. After starting life in extremely modest circumstances in Mexico...
 
19.
“ He was the theater producer in The Country Girl. ” - lora-31
 
20.
Arthur Kennedy
Arthur Kennedy, one of the premier character actors in American film from the late 1940s through the early 1960s, achieved fame in the role of Biff in Elia Kazan's historic production of Arthur Miller's Pultizer-Prize winning play "Death of a Salesman." Although he was not selected to recreate the role on screen...
 
21.
Arthur O'Connell
Though veteran character actor Arthur O'Connell was born in New York City in 1908, he looked as countrified as apple pie, looking ever more comfy in overalls than he ever did in a suit. He made his stage debut in the mid 1930s and came into contact with Orson Welles' Mercury Theatre. As a result, he earned the bit role of a reporter in the final scenes of Citizen Kane (1941)...
 
22.
Arthur Shields
Though not as well known as his nearly decade-older brother Barry Fitzgerald, Shields was a talented actor with well over twice the film roles in his career. Fitzgerald was already a well established player at the renowned Dublin Abbey Theater when Shields, also bitten by the acting bug, joined in 1914...
“ Barry Fitzgerald's brother and spitting image (I actually confuse them!). ” - lora-31
 
23.
Arthur Treacher
Born Arthur Veary Treacher in Brighton, East Sussex, England, he was the son of a lawyer. He established a stage career after returning from World War I, and by 1928, he had come to America as part of a musical-comedy revue called Great Temptations. When his film career began in the early 1930s, Treacher was Hollywood's idea of the perfect butler...
“ The embodiment of a perfect butler-type. ” - lora-31
 
25.
Barnett Parker
Within the British colony of expatriate actors in Hollywood during the 1930's, Barnett Parker was among the most stereotypical. Harrowgate College-educated, straight-backed, balding and well-intoned, Parker caricatured a multitude of unctuous, stiff-upper-lip butlers, man-servants or waiters, though his performances could...
 
27.
Barry Fitzgerald
One of Hollywood's finest character actors and most accomplished scene stealers, Barry Fitzgerald was born William Joseph Shields in 1888 in Dublin, Ireland. Educated to enter the banking business, the diminutive Irishman with the irresistible brogue was bitten by the acting bug in the 1920s and joined Dublin's world-famous Abbey Players...
 
28.
Barton MacLane
Barton MacLane graduated from Wesleyan University, where he displayed a notable aptitude for sports, in particular football and basketball. Not surprisingly, his physical prowess led to an early role in The Quarterback with Richard Dix. MacLane once commented that, as an actor, he needed to have the physical strength to tear the bad guys "from limb to limb"...
 
29.
Basil Rathbone
Basil Rathbone was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 1892, but three years later his family was forced to flee the country because his father was accused by the Boers of being a British spy at a time when Dutch-British conflicts were leading to the Boer War. The Rathbones escaped to England, where Basil and his two younger siblings...
“ He played the most menacing villains. Yes, I know he played Sherlock Holmes too, but somehow I am not a favorite of that string of movies. ” - lora-31
 
30.
Ben Johnson
Born in Oklahoma, Ben Johnson was a ranch hand and rodeo performer when, in 1940, Howard Hughes hired him to take a load of horses to California. He decided to stick around (the pay was good), and for some years was a stunt man, horse wrangler, and double for such stars as John Wayne, Gary Cooper and James Stewart...
 
31.
Bert Freed
During the '50s and '60s it seemed like every time you turned around, there was Bert Freed as a detective, gangster, sheriff or greedy small-town businessman, and sci-fi fans will remember him as the police chief taken over by the Martians in the classic Invaders from Mars. He played a lot of tough cops--sometimes crooked ones...
 
32.
Billy Gilbert
The son of singers in the Metropolitan Opera, Billy Gilbert began performing in vaudeville at age 12. He developed a drawn-out, explosive sneezing routine that became his trademark (he was the model for, and voice of, Sneezy in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs). Gilbert's exquisite comic timing made him the perfect foil for such comedians as Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy...
“ Mr. Pettybone in "His Girl Friday." ” - lora-31
 
33.
Brian Aherne
Actor, I Confess
Brian Aherne was an Oscar-nominated Anglo-American stage and screen actor who was one of the top cinema character actors in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. Born on May 2, 1902 in King's Norton, Worcestshire, England, Aherne performed as an actor as a child. At age 18 he made his debut as an adult with the company that would evolve into the world-famous Birmingham Repertory Theatre...
 
34.
Brian Donlevy
It seems that Brian Donlevy started out life as colorfully as any character he ever played on the stage or screen. He lied about his age (he was actually 14) in 1916 so he could join the army. When Gen. John J. Pershing sent American troops to invade Mexico in pursuit of Pancho Villa--Mexican rebels under Villa's command raided Columbus...
“ A really tough guy with intelligent eyes. He should have been nominated for "The Great McGinty." He got a nod for "Beau Geste" in which he created the model for an efficient sergeant -- later generations of actors playing sergeants all took after him. ” - lora-31
 
35.
Broderick Crawford
Broderick Crawford is best remembered for two roles: his Oscar-winning turn as Willie Stark in All the King's Men, and as Chief Dan Matthews on the syndicated TV series Highway Patrol. He was also memorable as Judy Holliday's boisterous boyfriend in Born Yesterday. He was born William Broderick Crawford on December 9...
 
36.
Bruce Bennett
Herman Brix was a star shot-putter in the 1928 Olympics. After losing the lead in MGM's Tarzan the Ape Man due to a shoulder injury, he was contracted by Ashton Dearholt for his independent production of The New Adventures of Tarzan, a serial and the only Tarzan film between the silents and the 1960s to present the character accurately...
“ Bland husband of Mildred Pierce. And he should not have tried to get into the company of real tough guys: Bogart, Huston, Holt. Oh no. ” - lora-31
 
37.
Buddy Ebsen
Buddy Ebsen began his career as a dancer in the late 1920s in a Broadway chorus. He later formed a vaudeville act with his sister Vilma Ebsen, which also appeared on Broadway. In 1935 he and his sister went to Hollywood, where they were signed for the first of MGM's Eleanor Powell movies, Broadway Melody of 1936...
 
38.
Burgess Meredith
Actor, Rocky
One of the truly great and gifted performers of the century who often suffered lesser roles, Burgess Meredith was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1907 and educated in Amherst College in Massachusetts before joining Eva Le Gallienne's stage company in New York City in 1933. He became a favorite of dramatist Maxwell Anderson...
 
39.
Burl Ives
Burl Ives was one of six children born to a Scottish-Irish farming family. He first sang in public for a soldiers' reunion when he was age 4. In high school, he learned the banjo and played fullback, intending to become a football coach when he enrolled at Eastern Illinois State Teacher's College in 1927. He dropped out in 1930 and wandered, hitching rides, doing odd jobs, street singing...
“ Oh boy, was he real menacing in "The Big Country"! ” - lora-31
 
40.
C. Aubrey Smith
Actor, Rebecca
Movie roles are sometimes based upon what the audience expects to see. If the role called for the tall stereotypical Englishmen with the stiff upper lip and stern determination, that man would be C. Aubrey Smith, graduate of Cambridge University, a leading Freemason and a test cricketer for England...
“ A distinguished-loooking English gent, played noblemen. ” - lora-31
 
41.
Cameron Mitchell
Cameron Mitchell was the son of a minister, but chose a different path from his father. Prior to World War II, in which he served as an Air Force bombardier, Mitchell appeared on Broadway, and, in 1940, an experimental television broadcast, "The Passing of the Third Floor Back". He made his film debut in What Next, Corporal Hargrove?...
 
42.
Carleton Young
American character actor noted for his deep, rich voice. Young made his Broadway debut in the early 1930s, appearing in such plays as "Page Pygmalion", "The Man Who Reclaimed His Head", "Late Wisdom" and "Yesterday's Orchids". Moving to Hollywood in 1936, he began getting small film roles and soon graduated to frequent appearances in B-Westerns and serials...
 
43.
Cecil Kellaway
Though a native of South Africa, Cecil Kellaway spent many years as an actor, author and director in the Australian film industry until he tried his luck in Hollywood in the 1930s. Finding he could get only gangster bit parts, he got discouraged and returned to Australia. Then William Wyler called and offered him a part in Wuthering Heights...
“ He was awfully miscast in "The Postman Awlays Rings Twice," but he was there alright.

(Thanks to Mr. Cogger for the correction and opinion.) ” - lora-31
 
44.
Cedric Hardwicke
Actor, Rope
Sir Cedric Hardwicke, one of the great character actors in the first decades of the talking picture, was born in Lye, England on February 19, 1893. Hardwicke attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and made his stage debut in 1912. His career was interrupted by military service in World War I, but he returned to the stage in 1922 with the Birmingham Repertory Theatre...
 
45.
Cesar Romero
Tall, suave and sophisticated Cesar Romero actually had two claims to fame in Hollywood. To one generation, he was the distinguished Latin lover of numerous musicals and romantic comedies, and the rogue bandit The Cisco Kid in a string of low-budget westerns. However, to a younger generation weaned on television...
 
46.
Charles Bickford
American character actor of gruff voice and appearance who was a fixture in Hollywood pictures from the earliest days of the talkies. The fifth of seven children, he was born in the first minute of 1891. He was a boisterous child, and at nine was tried and acquitted for attempted murder in the shooting of a motorman who had run over his dog...
“ I love him. ” - lora-31
 
47.
 
48.
Charles Coburn
A cigar-smoking, monocled, swag-bellied character actor known for his Old South manners and charm. In 1918 he and his first wife formed the Coburn Players and appeared on Broadway in many plays. With her death in 1937, he accepted a Hollywood contract and began making films at the age of sixty.
 
51.
Charles Halton
A respected stage actor -- he trained at the New York Academy of Dramatic Arts -- since the 1920s, birdlike Charles Halton's thinning hair, rimless glasses and officious manner were familiar to generations of moviegoers. Whether playing the neighborhood busybody, a stern government bureaucrat or weaselly attorney...
 
52.
Charles Lane
Mean, miserly and miserable-looking, they didn't come packaged with a more annoying and irksome bow than Charles Lane. Glimpsing even a bent smile from this unending sourpuss was extremely rare, unless one perhaps caught him in a moment of insidious glee after carrying out one of his many nefarious schemes...
“ He was... everywhere. ” - lora-31
 
53.
Charles Laughton
Actor, Spartacus
Charles Laughton was born on July 1, 1899 in Yorkshire, England. He was the son of Robert Laughton, a Yorkshire hotel keeper. His mother was a devout Roman Catholic of Irish ancestry. Laughton briefly attended Scarborough College, a local boys' school in his area before attending Stonyhurst College, an English Jesult school...
 
54.
Charles McGraw
Actor, The Birds
Gravel voiced, stoney faced & grizzled looking actor Charles McGraw notched up dozens of TV and film appearances often portraying law enforcement figures or military officers, plus the odd shifty gangster. Noted appearances include as dogged cop Det. Sgt. Walter Brown protecting a mob witness in the 1952 noir classic The Narrow Margin ...
“ A superb tough guy, one of the toughest. ” - lora-31
 
55.
Charles Ruggles
Charles Ruggles had one of the longest careers in Hollywood, lasting more than 50 years and encompassing more than 100 films. He made his film debut in 1914 in The Patchwork Girl of Oz and worked steadily after that. He was memorably paired with Mary Boland in a series of comedies in the early 1930s, and was one of the standouts in the all-star comedy If I Had a Million...
“ Can't imagine Hollywood Golden Age comedy without him! ” - lora-31
 
56.
Chill Wills
Actor, Giant
Colorful character actor of American Westerns. Named "Chill" as an ironic comment on his birth date being the hottest day of 1903. A musician from his youth, he performed from the age of 12 with tent shows, in vaudeville, and with stock companies. While performing in vaudeville in Kansas City, he married ballet dancer Betty Chappelle...
 
57.
“ He usually was a small-part foreigner. ” - lora-31
 
58.
Charles Winninger
Short, chubby-framed, twinkle-eyed, ever-huggable Charles Winninger was a veteran vaudevillian by the time he arrived in talking films. Born in a trunk to show biz folk in Athens, Wisconsin, on May 26, 1884, he was initially christened Karl Winninger. He left school while quite young (age 8) to join and tour with his parent's vaudeville family act which was called Winninger Family Concert Co...
 
59.
Charley Grapewin
This old codger film favorite, born in 1869 (some reports say 1875), got into the entertainment field at an early age, first as a circus performer (aerialist and trapeze artist). When acting sparked his interest, he worked in a series of stock companies while writing stage plays that he himself could star in...
 
60.
Chuck Connors
Chuck Connors was born Kevin Joseph Connors in Brooklyn, New York, to Marcella (Londrigan) and Alban Francis "Allan" Connors. His parents were immigrants from the Dominion of Newfoundland (now part of Canada), and were of Irish descent. Chuck and his two-years-younger sister, Gloria, grew up in a working-class section of the west side of Brooklyn...
 
61.
Clarence Kolb
Contrary to his familiar image, Clarence Kolb started out as one half of a vaudeville comedy act, Kolb and Dill. He made a few shorts in 1916 and a feature in 1917, but went back to vaudeville and the stage immediately thereafter, and did not return to films until the late 1930s. His stern, authoritarian looks and booming voice fit the irascible...
 
62.
Claude Rains
Actor, Casablanca
William Claude Rains, born in the Camberwell area of London, was the son of the British stage actor Frederick Rains. The younger Rains followed, making his stage debut at the age of eleven in "Nell of Old Drury." Growing up in the world of theater, he saw not only acting up close but the down-to-earth business end as well...
“ You certainly know *HIM!* (He was in "Casablanca," in "Notorious," in "Now, Voyager"...) ” - lora-31
 
63.
Clem Bevans
Actor, Saboteur
Born in 1879, Clem Bevans spent most of his performing career on the stage. First appearing in 1900 in a vaudeville act with Grace Emmett as a boy and girl act, he would move on to burlesque and eventually make the move to Broadway and even opera productions. His first screen appearance did not come until 1935...
 
64.
Cliff Edwards
Becoming popular with playing the ukulele, his unique singing and supplying the voice of animated movies, Cliff Edwards was one of the most popular singers in America. Born in Hannibal, Missouri, Edwards left school at the age of 14, moved to St. Louis, and started to work as a singer in saloons. Edwards then taught himself to play the ukulele...
 
65.
Clifton Webb
Actor, Laura
Already trained in dance and theater, he quit school at age 13 to study music and painting. By 19 he was a professional ballroom dancer in New York, and by his mid-twenties he was performing in musicals, dramas on Broadway and in London, and in silent movies. His first real success in film came in middle age as the classy villain Waldo Lydecker in Laura...
“ Yes, he was a leading man too. Superb in everything. ” - lora-31
 
66.
Conrad Veidt
Actor, Casablanca
Conrad Veidt attended the Sophiengymnasium (secondary school) in the Schoeneberg district of Berlin, and graduated without a diploma in 1912, last in his class of 13. Conrad liked animals, theater, cinema, fast cars, pastries, thunderstorms, gardening, swimming and golfing. He disliked heights, flying...
“ He was in "Casablanca." ” - lora-31
 
67.
“ He was the pickpocket in Casablanca. ” - lora-31
 
68.
Dan Duryea
Dan Duryea was definitely the man you went to the movies for and loved to hate. His sniveling, deliberately taunting demeanor and snarling flat, nasal tones set the actor apart from other similar slimeballs of the 1940s and 1950s. From his very first picture, the highly acclaimed The Little Foxes, in which he portrayed the snotty...
“ How many facets can a bad guy have? Mr. Duryea explored them all, I believe, and managed to stay alike and different in his many "bad guy" roles. His presence in a movie already guarantees a good noir, as a rule. ” - lora-31
 
69.
Dan Seymour
Actor, Key Largo
Dan attended Senn High School in Chicago and graduated from the University of Chicago with a B.S. in Fine Arts. While in college, he worked in many school plays and also worked at night as an emcee at various Chicago night clubs becoming quite successful. He moved to Hollywood where his rotund build (265 pounds)...
“ He was in "Casablanca." ” - lora-31
 
70.
Dan Tobin
Dan Tobin's career in Hollywood as a small part supporting player spanned three decades, beginning in 1939. Adding to his slightly shifty appearance -- squinty eyes, high cheekbones and generally sporting a thin moustache -- was a fussy, bumptious manner, which made him ideal typecasting as supercilious...
 
71.
Dane Clark
Dane Clark was born Bernard Elliot Zanville in Brooklyn, New York City, to Rose (Korostoff) and Samuel Zanville, who were Russian Jewish immigrants. He graduated from Cornell University and St. John's Law School (Brooklyn). When he had trouble finding work in the mid-1930s he tried boxing, baseball...
“ Thanks to Gwenn Roberts who added him. ” - lora-31
 
72.
Darryl Hickman
Actor, Network
Although younger brother Dwayne Hickman is probably the better-remembered sibling today with his still-huge cult following as TV's Dobie Gillis, Darryl Hickman was certainly the more popular actor and deemed more talented when they were children. During his years at MGM in the wartime 40s, Darryl was featured prominently in many grade "A" film productions...
 
73.
Dave Willock
For over five decades veteran character actor Dave Willock could be spotted as your friendly neighbor, buddy or unassuming blue-collar in hundreds of assorted films--both comedy and drama. Tall and lanky marked with a slightly long, gaunt puss, flat vocal pattern and jug-like ears, he was for the most part an amiable guy who blended in unobtrusively as a benign servile -- cabbie...
 
74.
Dean Jagger
Dean Jagger was born in Lima, Ohio, on November 7, 1903. He dropped out of high school twice before finally graduating from Wabash College. Working first as a school teacher, he soon became interested in acting and enrolled at Chicago's "Lyceum Art Conservatory". Mr. Jagger made his first movie and only silent film...
“ He had that nervous and audacious quality about him at the same time. ” - lora-31
 
75.
DeForest Kelley
Actor, Star Trek
Jackson DeForest Kelley was born on January 20, 1920 in Toccoa, Georgia, to Clora (Casey) and Ernest David Kelley. He graduated from high school at age 16 and went on to sing at the Baptist church where his father was a minister. At age 17, he made his first trip outside the state to visit an uncle in Long Beach...
 
76.
Dickie Moore
Dickie Moore made his acting and screen debut at the age of 18 months in the 1927 John Barrymore film The Beloved Rogue as a baby, and by the time he had turned 10 he was a popular child star and had appeared in 52 films. He continued as a child star for many more years, and became the answer to the trivia question...
“ One of the least annoying children in Hollywood cinema. ” - lora-31
 
77.
Don Beddoe
American character actor. Raised in New York City and Cincinnati, Ohio, Beddoe was the son of a professor at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music who happened also to be the world-famous Welsh tenor, Dan Beddoe. Although Don Beddoe intended a career in journalism, he took an interest in theatre and became involved first with amateur companies and then with professional theatre troupes...
 
78.
Don DeFore
Actor, Hazel
Don Defore played Mr. Thornberry ("Thorny") on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, a role that came came easy for him as in real life he was pretty much like his "Thorny" character. He married his wife Marion in 1942 and they lived in a farmhouse in the Mandeville Canyon area outside Los Angeles, which was then farm country...
 
79.
Donald Crisp
Donald Crisp was born George William Crisp at the family home in Bow, London. Donald's parents were James Crisp and Elizabeth Crisp, his birth was registered by his mother on 4th September 1882. Donald's sisters were Elizabeth, Ann, Alice (known as Louisa) and Eliza and his brothers were James, John and Mark...
 
80.
Donald MacBride
Best known for his work in slapstick comedy and detective whodunits, character actor Donald MacBride lent his serious, craggy mug and determined professionalism to scores of 30s and 40s crimers. Born in Brooklyn, he first appeared on the vaudeville and Broadway stages as a teenage singer in such shows as "George White's Scandals" and "Room Service." Taking a chance on Hollywood...
 
81.
Donald Meek
Actor, Stagecoach
One Hollywood stalwart whose screen incarnations more than lived up to his name was bald-domed character actor Donald Meek, forever typecast as mousy, timorous or browbeaten Casper Milquetoasts. He stood at 5 ft. 6 in. in his boots and weighed a mere 81 pounds. However, the little Glaswegian's personal history rather belied his gormless image on the silver screen...
“ A funny little man -- I wonder who the wise guy was who cast him as a villain in the two Jesse/Frank James movies? ” - lora-31
 
82.
Douglas Kennedy
A tall, powerfully built man, Douglas Kennedy entered films after graduating from Amherst. Making his debut in 1940, he appeared in many westerns and detective thrillers, often as a villain. World War II interrupted his career, and he spent the war years as a Signal Corps officer and an operative in the OSS and US Army Intelligence...
 
83.
Douglass Dumbrille
Distinguished character villain Douglass (R.) Dumbrille, whose distinctive stern features, beady eyes, tidy mustache, prominent hook nose and suave, cultivated presence graced scores of talking films, was born on October 13, 1889, in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. He was first employed as a bank clerk in...
“ He opposed Gary Cooper thrice! (In "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town," "Peter Ibbetson," and "The Lives of a Bengal Lancer.") ” - lora-31
 
84.
“ He even played a Chinese man! ” - lora-31
 
85.
E.G. Marshall
With over 150 Film and TV appearances to his credit, E.G. Marshall was arguably most well known as the imperturbable Juror No. 4 in the Sidney Lumet mystery 12 Angry Men. Some of his stand-out performances are in Creepshow, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, and Nixon. Marshall married three times and had seven children.
“ He was in "12 Angry Men." ” - lora-31
 
86.
Ed Begley
Charismatic character star Edward James Begley was born in Hartford, Connecticut of Irish parents and educated at St.Patrick's school. His interest in acting first surfaced at the age of nine, when he performed amateur theatricals at the Hartford Globe Theatre. Determined to make his own way, he left home aged eleven and drifted from job to job...
“ He was in "12 Angry Men." ” - lora-31
 
87.
Eddie Albert
Eddie Albert's television career is the earliest of any other performer. It began years before electronic television was introduced to the public. In June of 1936 Eddie appeared in RCA/NBC's first private live performance for their radio licensees in New York City. This was very early experimental all electronic television system...
“ He was Gregory Peck's sidekick in The Roman Holiday. ” - lora-31
 
88.
Edgar Buchanan
At the age of seven, he and his family moved to Oregon. After studying at the University of Oregon, he followed in his father's footsteps and became a dentist, graduating from North Pacific Dental College. From 1929 to 1937, he practiced oral surgery in Eugene, Oregon. He then moved his practice to Altadena...
“ His voice and mannerisms are totally unforgettable. ” - lora-31
 
89.
“ He was probably a champion playing motor cops and all sorts of cops hundreds of times. ” - lora-31
 
90.
Edmond O'Brien
Oscar-winner Edmond O'Brien was one of the most-respected character actors in American cinema, from his heyday of the mid-1940s through the late 1960s. Born on September 10, 1915, in the New York City borough of The Bronx, O'Brien learned the craft of performance as a magician, reportedly tutored by neighbor Harry Houdini...
“ See "D.O.A.," "The Web," and "The Killers" -- he was in some of the best noirs. And he won an Oscar for "The Barefoot Contessa." ” - lora-31
 
91.
Edmund Gwenn
There are very few character actors from the 1930s, '40s or '50s who rose to the rank of stardom. Only a rare man or woman reached the level of renown and admiration, and had enough audience appeal, to be the first name in a cast's billing, a name that got marquee posting. Charles Coburn comes to mind, but there aren't many others. However, one who made it was Edmund Gwenn...
“ One and only Santa Claus ("The Miracle on 34th Street"). ” - lora-31
 
92.
Edward Arnold
Edward Arnold was born as Gunther Edward Arnold Schneider in 1890, on the Lower East Side of New York City, the son of German immigrants, Elizabeth (Ohse) and Carl Schneider. Arnold began his acting career on the New York stage and became a film actor in 1916. A burly man with a commanding style and superb baritone voice...
“ Dimond Jim, Daniel Webster, a goodie goodie father, a tired businessman, or an evil tycoon -- he is superb in every role. ” - lora-31
 
93.
Edward Binns
Gravel-voiced, authoritative American character actor, a reliable presence on screen for more than four decades. The son of Pennsylvania Quakers, he was a graduate of Pennsylvania State University and first learned his trade as an apprentice at the Cleveland Playhouse. Binns was among the first to join the newly established Actors Studio in 1947...
“ He was in 12 Angry Men. ” - lora-31
 
94.
Edward Brophy
Edward S. Brophy was born on February 27, 1895 in New York City and educated at the University of Virginia. He became a bit and small-part in the movies starting in 1919, but switched to behind-the-scenes work for job security, though he continued appearing in small parts. While serving as a property master for Buster Keaton's production unit at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer...
 
95.
Edward Everett Horton
It seemed like Edward Everett Horton appeared in just about every Hollywood comedy made in the 1930s. He was always the perfect counterpart to the great gentlemen and protagonists of the films. Horton was born in Brooklyn, New York City, to Isabella S. (Diack) and Edward Everett Horton, a compositor for the NY Times...
“ The embodiment of gentlemanly goofiness. I don't know how to put it into words, but, well, you know without my telling you, right? ” - lora-31
 
97.
Eduardo Ciannelli
Eduardo Ciannelli was born on the beautiful island of Ischia in the Bay of Naples, which is renowned for its thermal baths. His father, a physician, owned a health spa there and Eduardo briefly followed the same career path and studied medicine at the University of Naples, graduating as a fully qualified doctor...
 
98.
Eli Wallach
One of Hollywood's finest character / "Method" actors, Eli Wallach was in demand for over 60 years (first film/TV role was 1949) on stage and screen, and has worked alongside the world's biggest stars, including Clark Gable, Clint Eastwood, Steve McQueen, Marilyn Monroe, Yul Brynner, Peter O'Toole, and Al Pacino, to name but a few...
 
99.
Elisha Cook Jr.
Although this pint-sized actor started out in films often in innocuous college-student roles in mid-30s rah-rahs, playing alongside the likes of a pretty Gloria Stuart or a young, pre-"Oz" Judy Garland, casting directors would soon enough discover his flair for portraying intense neurotics or spineless double-dealers...
“ The "gunsel" in "The Maltese Falcon. And many, oh so many more. ” - lora-31