Movie Terminology Glossary: R

R

AKA: Restricted
A certificate issued by the MPAA indicating that persons under the age of 16 would only be admitted when accompanied by an adult. The age was later raised to under 17 years old, and varies in some jurisdictions. See also NC-17, PG-13.

On the web: MPAA Ratings Explanation


Railroad Coordinator

A person who advises a production on railroad history, architecture, business practices, economics, equipment, locations, and strategies to attain maximum on-screen production/artistic values, and then locates/scouts/evaluates railroad equipment and locations; coordinates railroad equipment assembly/dispersal at a filming location; plans and executes for camera railroad operations; exercises overall set safety management (in accordance with US Federal Railroad, Transport Canada, and Ferrocarill de Mexico regulations); is responsible for equipment and railroad operations budget development and management.

Railroad Consultant

A person who advises a production on railroad history, architecture, business practices, economics, equipment, locations, and strategies to attain maximum on-screen production/artistic values.

Re-recording Mixer

AKA: Sound re-recording mixer
A member of the sound crew responsible for mixing the final sound elements (dialogue, music, sound effects and foley). In most feature films and some television shows there is a crew of three re-recording mixers (one for dialog, one for sound effects and foley and one for music.) Sometimes in television the music mixer mixes the foley for expediency. There are also two-person crews in which the dialog mixer (generally considered the lead mixer) mixes music as well, with the other person mixing sound effects and foley.

Reel

A strip of film wound on a metal wheel. Typical reels hold 15-25 minutes of film.

Release

AKA: Released
When a movie is shipped to exhibitors by the distributor, it is deemed to have been released for public viewing - there are no longer any studio restrictions on who can see the movie.

Reverse Shot

AKA: Reverse Angle, Hollywood Reverse
A shot taken at a 120-180 degree angle from the preceding shot. When used in dialogue scenes, reverse-shot editing usually alternates between over-the-shoulder shots that show each character speaking. See also shot/reverse shot.

Rigger

Workers responsible for the setting, hanging and focussing of lighting instruments and constructing scaffolding used in making film sets.

Room Tone

Different sets and locations have different audio characteristics. A sound recordist will typically make a recording of the natural ambient "silence" in a set/location for the sound editor, who will use it as a reference point, or for when silence is required.

Fictional Movie(s): Living in Oblivion (1995)


Rotoscoping

AKA: Rotoscope
An animation technique in which images of live action are traced, either manually or automatically. See also motion capture.

Rushes

See dailies.