Peter Brand
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Quotes for
Peter Brand (Character)
from Moneyball (2011)

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Moneyball (2011)
Billy Beane: Would you rather get one shot in the head or five in the chest and bleed to death?
Peter Brand: Are those my only two options?

Peter Brand: Billy, this is Chad Bradford. He's a relief pitcher. He is one of the most undervalued players in baseball. His defect is that he throws funny. Nobody in the big leagues cares about him, because he looks funny. This guy could be not just the best pitcher in our bullpen, but one of the most effective relief pitchers in all of baseball. This guy should cost $3 million a year. We can get him for $237,000.

David Justice: Why doesn't your boss travel with the team?
Peter Brand: He doesn't like to... mingle with the players.
David Justice: Is that supposed to make us easier to cut?

Peter Brand: I wanted you to see these player evaluations that you asked me to do.
Billy Beane: I asked you to do three.
Peter Brand: Yeah.
Billy Beane: To evaluate three players.
Peter Brand: Yeah.
Billy Beane: How many you'd do?
Peter Brand: Forty-seven.
Billy Beane: Okay.
Peter Brand: Actually, fifty-one. I don't know why I lied just then.

Billy Beane: [approaching Brand after a meeting with the Cleveland Indians] Hey.
Peter Brand: Hello.
Billy Beane: Who are you?
Peter Brand: I'm Peter Brand.
Billy Beane: What do you do?
Peter Brand: I'm special assistant to Mark Shapiro.
Billy Beane: So, what do you do?
Peter Brand: Mostly player analysis right now.
Billy Beane: Been on the job long? First job in baseball?
Peter Brand: It's my first job anywhere.
Billy Beane: Wow, congrats.
Peter Brand: Thanks.
Billy Beane: First job. Whose nephew are you? Why does Mark listen to you?
Peter Brand: [stammering] I don't think, uh... I don't think he does very often.
Billy Beane: He just did.
Peter Brand: Well, in that circumstance, I think he was more listening to Bruce than myself.
Billy Beane: Mm-hmm. Who are you?
Peter Brand: I'm Peter Brand.
Billy Beane: I don't give a rat's ass what your name is. What happened in there? What happened in that room?
Peter Brand: I'm not quite sure what you're asking me, Mr. Beane.
Billy Beane: What did you tell Bruce?
Peter Brand: I just told Bruce I like Garcia.
Billy Beane: You like Garcia. Why? Why?
Peter Brand: [looking around nervously] I don't know.

Peter Brand: There is an epidemic failure within the game to understand what is really happening. And this leads people who run Major League Baseball teams to misjudge their players and mismanage their teams. I apologize.
Billy Beane: Go on.
Peter Brand: Okay. People who run ball clubs, they think in terms of buying players. Your goal shouldn't be to buy players, your goal should be to buy wins. And in order to buy wins, you need to buy runs. You're trying to replace Johnny Damon. The Boston Red Sox see Johnny Damon and they see a star who's worth seven and half million dollars a year. When I see Johnny Damon, what I see is... is... an imperfect understanding of where runs come from. The guy's got a great glove. He's a decent leadoff hitter. He can steal bases. But is he worth the seven and half million dollars a year that the Boston Red Sox are paying him? No. No. Baseball thinking is medieval. They are asking all the wrong questions. And if I say it to anybody, I'm-I'm ostracized. I'm-I'm-I'm a leper. So that's why I'm-I'm cagey about this with you. That's why I... I respect you, Mr. Beane, and if you want full disclosure, I think it's a good thing that you got Damon off your payroll. I think it opens up all kinds of interesting possibilities.

Peter Brand: It's about getting things down to one number. Using the stats the way we read them, we'll find value in players that no one else can see. People are overlooked for a variety of biased reasons and perceived flaws. Age, appearance, personality. Bill James and mathematics cut straight through that. Billy, of the 20,000 notable players for us to consider, I believe that there is a championship team of twenty-five people that we can afford, because everyone else in baseball undervalues them.

Billy Beane: It's hard not to be romantic about baseball. This kind of thing, it's fun for the fans. It sells tickets and hot dogs. Doesn't mean anything.
Peter Brand: Billy, we just won twenty games in a row.
Billy Beane: And what's the point?
Peter Brand: We just got the record.
Billy Beane: Man, I've been doing this for... listen, man. I've been in this game a long time. I'm not in it for a record, I'll tell you that. I'm not in it for a ring. That's when people get hurt. If we don't win the last game of the Series, they'll dismiss us.
Peter Brand: Billy...
Billy Beane: I know these guys. I know the way they think, and they will erase us. And everything we've done here, none of it'll matter. Any other team wins the World Series, good for them. They're drinking champagne, they get a ring. But if we win, on our budget, with this team... we'll have changed the game. And that's what I want. I want it to mean something.

Peter Brand: [Sleeping. His phone rings, waking him up] Hello?
Billy Beane: Pete? It's Billy Beane.
Peter Brand: Wh-what time is it?
Billy Beane: I don't know. Pete, would you have drafted me in the first round?
Peter Brand: What?
Billy Beane: After we talked, you looked me up. Would you have drafted me in the first round?
Peter Brand: Yeah, I did. You-you were pretty good.
Billy Beane: Cut the crap, Pete. Would you have drafted me in the first round?
Peter Brand: I would have picked you in the 9th round. No signing bonus. I think that would have convinced you to accept that scholarship.
Billy Beane: Pack your bags, Pete. I just bought you from the Cleveland Indians.

Billy Beane: Where you from, Pete?
Peter Brand: Maryland.
Billy Beane: Where'd you go to school?
Peter Brand: Yale. I went to Yale.
Billy Beane: What'd you study?
Peter Brand: Economics. I studied economics.
Billy Beane: Yale, economics, and baseball. You're funny, Pete.

Peter Brand: The Visalia Oaks and our 240 lb catcher Jeremy Brown, who as you know, scared to run to second base. This was in a game six weeks ago. This guy is going to start him off with a fastball. Jeremy's going to take him to deep center. Here's what's really interesting, because Jeremy's gonna do what he never does. He's gonna go for it. He's gonna around first and he's gonna go for it. Okay?
[On the video, Jeremy trips and falls over first base]
Peter Brand: This is all Jeremy's nightmares coming to life.
Billy Beane: Awwww, they're laughing at him.
Peter Brand: And Jeremy's about to find out why. Jeremy's about to realize that the ball went 60 feet over the fence. He hit a home run and didn't even realize it.

Peter Brand: [sportscasters are crediting Art Howe for the A's dramatic turnaround] Did you hear that?
Billy Beane: All I heard was "seven in a row".

Billy Beane: [after the Opening Day ceremony] I'm going in. Text me the play by play.
Peter Brand: What? Why?
Billy Beane: [as if it's obvious] I don't watch the games.

Peter Brand: It's about getting things down to one number. Using stats to reread them, we'll find the value of players that nobody else can see. People are over looked for a variety of biased reasons and perceived flaws. Age, appearance, personality. Bill James and mathematics cuts straight through that. Billy, of the twenty thousand knowable players for us to consider, I believe that there is a championship team of twenty five people that we can afford. Because everyone else in baseball under values them. Like an island of misfit toys.