IMDb > Dean Acheson (Character)
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Dean Acheson (Character)
from Thirteen Days (2000)

The content of this page was created by users. It has not been screened or verified by IMDb staff.

Overview

Alternate Names:
Former Secretary of State Dean Acheson / Secretary of State Dean Acheson

Filmography

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Jump to filmography: Archive Footage
  1. "Spies, Lies and the Superbomb"
    ... aka "Nuclear Secrets" - UK (original title)
        - Superbomb (2007) TV episode, Played by Ben Tyler
  2. Thirteen Days (2000) Played by Len Cariou

  3. Truman (1995) (TV) Played by Remak Ramsay

  4. "Kennedy"
        - Episode #1.1 (1983) TV episode, Played by George Martin
        - Episode #1.5 (1983) TV episode, Played by George Martin
        - Episode #1.4 (1983) TV episode, Played by George Martin
        - Episode #1.7 (1983) TV episode, Played by George Martin
        - Episode #1.6 (1983) TV episode, Played by George Martin

  5. Tail Gunner Joe (1977) (TV) Played by Alan Hewitt
  6. Collision Course: Truman vs. MacArthur (1976) (TV) Played by Barry Sullivan (as Secretary of State Dean Acheson)
    ... aka "Collision Course" - USA (short title)
  7. The Missiles of October (1974) (TV) Played by John Dehner (as Former Secretary of State Dean Acheson)
    ... aka "Missiles of October" - International (English title) (informal short title)

  8. Die Kuba-Krise 1962 (1969) (TV) Played by Ernst Fritz Fürbringer
Archive Footage:
  1. Roots of the Cuban Missile Crisis (2001) (V) Played by Len Cariou

Additional Details


Fun Stuff

Quotes:
From Thirteen Days (2000)
Dean Acheson: Gentlemen, for the last fifteen years, I've fought at this table alongside your predecessors in the struggle against the Soviet. Now I do not wish to seem melodramatic, but I do wish to impress upon you a lesson I learned with bitter tears and great sacrifice. The Soviet understands only one language: action. Respects only one word: force. See more »

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