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Quotes for
John Beresford Tipton (Character)
from "The Millionaire" (1955)

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"The Millionaire: The Hugh Waring Story (#4.12)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk examining a file folder. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Holding and waving his eyeglasses] Beautiful day, isn't it, Mike?
Michael Anthony: Indeed it is, sir.
[Anthony glances off camera as if looking out a window]
Michael Anthony: It is a beautiful view from here, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: The world, Mike. A man's world is his horizon. What he can see, touch, think, or dream about. There's his hope, his reason for being.
Michael Anthony: In that sense, every man makes his own world.
John Beresford Tipton: Well, it's strange that you should say that, Mike.
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire has practically no horizon left at all.
[Anthony examines the name and address on the envelope, is startled and confused. Anthony places the envelope in his breast pocket and leaves]

Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters his office on the Tipton estate at night and slumps into the chair at his desk. The door opens and Tipton enters] You startled me, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton sits in a chair in front of Anthony's desk. Only his left arm is visible to viewers] I'm sorry, Mike. I heard you come in and I wanted to talk to you. What's the matter, Mike? You seem unusually stressed these last few days.
Michael Anthony: Sir, I can't get Hugh Waring out of my mind. I've studied his case thoroughly. I believe he's innocent.
John Beresford Tipton: Oh?
Michael Anthony: I almost wish I didn't. There's nothing I can do about it. The Warden won't call the Governor - and he's right. There's no new evidence. Sir, what good is a million dollars to a man who is about to die?
John Beresford Tipton: Thank you, Mike, that is a very pertinent question.

the Governor: [With a driving rainstorm howling outside, the Governor is visiting Tipton in his study. The Governor is seated and Tipton is standing off-screen with just his right arm visible to viewers] I tell you, Mr. Tipton, it's impossible.
John Beresford Tipton: Impossible, Governor?
the Governor: There's been a fair trial, a jury verdict, an appeal denied. And I have my responsibilities.
John Beresford Tipton: Among them, your responsibility to a human being.
the Governor: For a man guilty of murdering his wife. If I signed a stay of execution, the papers would murder me!
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, I suppose they would - if you were wrong. But if he proved to be innocent, you'd be a hero.
the Governor: Proved, proved! But who is going to prove it?
[a lightning strike knocks out the electricity]
John Beresford Tipton: Power failure. Don't worry, I have a standby generator.
[Moments later, electricity is restored. Tipton chuckes]
John Beresford Tipton: I guess I could make something of the point that good ideas are like a bolt of lightning - but I won't. Governor, we all believe that there is nothing more important than human life. It's the basic principle of our way of living.
[the scene changes to outside a window, with the rain pelting against the building and thunder booming. The Governor and Tipton continue to talk but further words are inaudible]

Michael Anthony: [the scene is in the conference room of Attorney Taylor with a large conference table with Taylor and Tipton present. Tipton is seated in a high backed chair with only his right arm visible to viewers. He is just putting out a cigar. Anthony enters the room] I'm sorry I'm a bit late, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: We still have a little time left for what we have to do.
Vincent Taylor: I must admit I was staggered by the amount of money Waring had left. I had no idea.
Eleanor Waring: [the door opens and Eleanor Waring enters] I'm Eleanor Waring.
Vincent Taylor: So he was right.
Eleanor Waring: [to Taylor] I went to see the Warden but he said I should see you. I didn't know. I didn't know about Hugh's execution. Now he's dead and it's all my fault. I wanted to hurt him. That's why I went away.
Vincent Taylor: Where have you been?
Eleanor Waring: I think I've been in a world all of my own. There were nightmares there, too. But this was the worst. I left him in anger, but I was planning to come back. I wanted him to worry, not wonder where I was.
Vincent Taylor: But where have you been all this time?
Eleanor Waring: On a mountaintop in Colorado, overlooking a ghost town. No People alive for miles, no radio, no papers.
[Hugh Waring, the Warden, and the Prosecutor discreetly enter the room, but Eleanor, whose back is to the door, is unaware of their presence]
Eleanor Waring: The day I went to Silver, I saw the headlines. Terrible headlines.
[Anthony now notices Hugh Waring]
Eleanor Waring: He was dead. I killed him.
Vincent Taylor: According to the terms of the will, you are to inherit a great deal of money.
Eleanor Waring: How can you talk about money? What good does it mean to me?
Hugh Waring: [Interrupting] You were always greedy for money.
Eleanor Waring: [Startled and shocked as she now notices Hugh] You!
Hugh Waring: It was a nice try, Eleanor, but it didn't work.
Eleanor Waring: The papers! It was in the papers!
[Turns vengeful]
Eleanor Waring: You tricked me! You cheated me! How could you do this to me? You made me the laughingstock of the world. I hate you! I hate you! I hate you!
[the Warden and Prosecutor begin to escort Eleanor out of the room]
Eleanor Waring: You can't prove anything! Let go of me! I haven't done anything!
[the Warden and Prosecutor wrestle Eleanor out of the room]
Hugh Waring: [Closing the door] It's the end of a nightmare.
[to Tipton]
Hugh Waring: Well, it's good to be alive, but I wouldn't be here if it hadn't been for you. If you hadn't gambled on my story being true.
John Beresford Tipton: I didn't gamble. We have a very courageous Governor who gambled on your innocence. He gave you a stay of execution, jeopardizing his entire political career by keeping it a secret.
Michael Anthony: Even I didn't know.
John Beresford Tipton: [to Anthony] Ah, but it was really you who did it. Your faith, your concern, your zeal.
Michael Anthony: It was?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckling] Of course.


"The Millionaire: The Josef Marton Story (#3.35)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton natural history museum. He is momentarily startled by a large, upright stuffed bear just inside the entrance door. Tipton is seated in a high backed chair, with only his left arm visible to the viewers as he strokes a live pigeon on his desk] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, science, which has revealed to us so many secrets of nature, has failed in two things. Know what they are?
Michael Anthony: No, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton continues petting the pigeon, which coos] This pigeon was released hundreds of miles from here and found it's way home. How?
Michael Anthony: We don't know, do we, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton places the pigeon into a basket on his desk and closes the lid. He picks up a tag from his desk and hands it to Anthony] And this tag is from a salmon. It conquered winds and tides to return to its spawning grounds, only to die.
[Anthony returns the tag to Tipton's desk]
John Beresford Tipton: There are people who are driven by the same instincts.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here is the name of our next millionaire. Let's see what his instincts are.
[Anthony bows and starts to depart. Before leaving, he takes another up-and-down look at the bear, as if expecting it to come alive]


"The Millionaire: The Hank Butler Story (#5.23)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters what can best be described as a playroom and discovers Tipton seated in a high backed chair with only his left arm visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
[Startled, as he observes Tipton seated next to a completely furnished dollhouse]
Michael Anthony: Sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] The enviable privilege of little girls and old men, Mike. Playing with dolls.
[Chuckles again]
Michael Anthony: [Anthony closely examines the dollhouse] I could be tempted myself, sir. It looks fascinating.
John Beresford Tipton: Fascinating and dangerous, Mike. Moving things and people about at will. Notice the mistress of the house here in the living room, Mike.
[Tipton picks up the doll and moves it]
John Beresford Tipton: A hand is all the power needed to let her have a pleasant rest in the bedroom.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony smiles as he further inspects the dollhouse] What about the master of the house, sir? I don't see him anywhere.
John Beresford Tipton: You will see him quite shortly, Mike.
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Susan Birchard Story (#4.27)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, smoking a cigar. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Tipton reaches for a framed picture of a young boy]
John Beresford Tipton: look at this.
[Tipton hands the photograph to Anthony. Tipton chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: He was a little self-conscious, wouldn't you say?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony examines the photo] Charming picture, sir. Who is it?
John Beresford Tipton: Oh, now, you mean you couldn't see the resemblance? That, Mike, is little Johnny Tipton, age ten.
Michael Anthony: [Surprised] You, sir?
[Anthony now examines the photo more closely]
Michael Anthony: Well, now that you mention it, I can see a certain...
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Oh, come on, Mike - you can not! You know, Mike, people don't realize how deep and permanent children's emotions are. Why, I still remember the first girl I fell in love with,
[Pointing to the photo]
John Beresford Tipton: when I was wearing that suit.
Michael Anthony: You do?
John Beresford Tipton: I wonder if she ever remembered me.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here you are, Mike - our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Wally Bannister Story (#4.32)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, where he observes Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, playing Solitaire. Only Tipton's hands are visible to the viewers, as he plays the Solitaire hands] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton continues to play Solitaire] Mike, there are so many different kinds of loneliness. A man can feel alone among many other people when he stands out alone against their opinion. A solitary game like that is a very difficult one.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and turns to leave]


"The Millionaire: The Michael Holm Story (#4.20)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Silverstone gardens where he finds Tipton watering a bouquet of flowers being held by the large statue of Lady Justice. Tipton is obstructed from the viewers by a column and only his left arm is visible when he waters the flowers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you know why Justice is always pictured as a woman - blindfolded, holding up scales?
Michael Anthony: Well, sir, it's my impression that she's supposed to weigh out justice equally and not be influenced by what she sees.
John Beresford Tipton: That's about it. But it's not an easy task and serving justice is a long, hard road to follow. Many men have fallen by the wayside.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see if this one does. And Mike, give me an exact report on him.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Ken Fowler Story (#1.11)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Silverstone estate hothouse to discover Tipton pruning, clipping and trimming some flowers in a flowerbox. Tipton is off-camera with only his gloved hands visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: What do you know about camellias, Mike?
Michael Anthony: Not much, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Holding up a single plant] Take this pretty young thing. Most people would want to leave it alone, to let it grow.
Michael Anthony: Isn't that the general idea, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: If you want something big, strong, and beautiful, you have to give it room to grow.
[Tipton removes the pot in which the camellia was growing, freeing the roots and placing the plant into soil in a larger environment]
John Beresford Tipton: Then one day soon, I'll show you a strong, healthy, and possibly perfect camellia. Sometimes, people have to do the same thing in their lives.
Michael Anthony: I see what you're driving at, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: So,
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: here is the name of my new millionaire, Mike. Let's see if he has the courage to grow.


"The Millionaire: The Jimmy Reilly Story (#3.27)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair at a desk, reading a book. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, some of the greatest love stories ever told were written about war. 'A Farwell to Arms' for instance. Have you ever read it?
Michael Anthony: Yes, indeed. The trouble is, most war-time love stories end so sadly.
John Beresford Tipton: We can write a different end to this war-time romance.
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: There's our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts envelope]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Sylvia Merrick (#6.17)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton dining area where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair sipping on coffee] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, look at this.
[Tipton hands over a large silver spoon to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: A copy of Benvenuto Cellini's most beautiful designs. And as a silversmith, he's never been equaled.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony inspects the spoon] Very beautiful, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: You've heard of people who were born with a silver spoon in their mouth?
Michael Anthony: [With a sly grin] Well, this one might be a little uncomfortable for a newborn baby, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] It can be, Mike. Sometimes being born into wealth and position and being given every advantage can be more than uncomfortable. It can be very dangerous.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and turns to leave]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Ellen Curry (#5.7)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, where he discovers Tipton seated in a high backed chair, reading a large poetry book] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you think Cupid is blind?
Michael Anthony: [With a wry smile] He hasn't come close enough for me to see.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton chuckles and then quotes from the book from Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream] "Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind. And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind."
Michael Anthony: [Questioning the author who wrote this statement] Shakespeare?
John Beresford Tipton: Shakespeare? He was often right. I wonder if he is this time.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and starts to leave]
John Beresford Tipton: Wait.
[Tipton reads from Shakespeare's Life and Death of King John]
John Beresford Tipton: "Make haste, swift messenger. The better foot before."
[Tipton chuckles. Anthony turns and departs]


"The Millionaire: The John Smith Story (#4.26)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the library, where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, reading a newspaper. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, what's my name?
Michael Anthony: [Startled] Why, you're John Beresford Tipton.
John Beresford Tipton: [Puts down newspaper and chuckles] A good name. Impressive. You know, it's helped get me where I am. Names are important, especially when you haven't got one.
[Indicates newspaper]
John Beresford Tipton: Now here's a man in a hospital in Philadelphia. He has amnesia - suffered a complete loss of memory.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
Michael Anthony: [Reviewing the name on the envelope] A Mr. John Smith?
John Beresford Tipton: A Mr. John Smith.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Story of Tod Burke (#2.33)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study and discovers Tipton seated in a high backed chair at a desk. Tipton is holding a tribal mask and many others are exhibited in the room. Only Tipton's left hand, holding a mask, is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Displaying the mask he holds] Look at this beauty, Mike, from the Melanesia Island of New Britain. You know, there the most solemn oath a man can take is this:
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: If I'm not telling the truth, may I shake hands with my mother-in-law.
Michael Anthony: Quite a far cry from the Bible's beautiful story of Ruth, who took her mother-in-law's hand and said "Wherever thou goes, I will go."
John Beresford Tipton: [Completing the quote] "And thy people shall be my people." Yes, Mike, a mother-in-law can be a trial or a joy, depending on the stature of those involved in it. Here's the name of a son who became deeply involved.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's our new millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Mildred Milliken Story (#1.23)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton Estate kennels to find Tipton petting some dogs. Tipton is off-camera with only his hands visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Four little puppies and a proud mother.
Michael Anthony: A busy mother too, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I know someone who would like to be a busy mother, too.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I'll be curious to know what happens to this person when she gets a million dollars.


"The Millionaire: The Chris Daniels Story (#3.34)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton library, where he sees Tipton seated in a high backed chair, browsing through some coats-of-arms. Only Tipton's left arm in visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Indicating the coats-of-arms]
John Beresford Tipton: these fascinate me. Some medieval knight undoubtedly carried this on his shield when he went forth to battle. Today, it's the family crest of one of our social elites. A way of telling you how far back their family tree is rooted.
Michael Anthony: Some philosophers maintain that pride of ancestry is a hollow virtue, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Well,
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: here's a young man who agrees with them. Our next millionaire.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony reads the address on the envelope] Moreland Park? Isn't that a racetrack, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: That's right, Mike.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: And as a friendly bit of advice, I suggest you stay away from the para mutual windows.
[Tipton chuckles and Anthony smiles and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Paul Naylor Story (#4.34)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Silverstone estate kitchen, where he finds Tipton enjoying cheese and crackers. Tipton is just off screen and only his hands are visible to the viewers as he spreads cheese on a cracker] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Offering the cracker to Anthony] Try that, Mike.
Michael Anthony: [Accepting the cracker] Oh, thank you, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I was just having a little snack.
Michael Anthony: [Tasting the cheese on the cracker] Hmmm, delicious.
[Anthony examines the label of the cheese jar]
Michael Anthony: Elixir of Fromage? Hmmm.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Sounds fancy, doesn't it? But it's just cheese. Good cheese, mind you, but the package and price have to make it taste a little better than it is. I guess a lot of us feel that whatever we buy is only as good as what we pay for it.
[Tipton spreads more cheese on another cracker]
John Beresford Tipton: Want another, Mike?
Michael Anthony: No, thank you, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Watching your diet, hey? I can't say that I blame you.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and leaves]


"The Millionaire: The Tom Bryan Story (#2.6)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the rose garden to find Tipton, off camera, examining a spider's web with a magnifying glass. Only Tipton's hands are visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, take a look at this spider.
[Tipton gives the magnifying glass to Anthony, who inspects the web]
John Beresford Tipton: I would say the bug is doomed, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: The bug is doomed. But so is the spider. The thing that promises so tasty a meal is what is called an assassin bug. The spider will die from its poison.
Michael Anthony: [Returning the magnifying glass] There's irony in that, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: It's a perfect example of what Oscar Wilde meant when he said, "In this world, there are only two tragedies. One is not getting what one wants and the other is getting it."
Michael Anthony: I know the quote well. It's from 'Lady Windermere's Fan.'
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony] Here's the name of a man who doesn't have what he wants. Give it to him, Mike - one million dollars.


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Jeff Mercer (#6.8)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton library to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, perusing a stock market ticker] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you own any stocks?
Michael Anthony: No, sir, I don't,
John Beresford Tipton: Then it makes no difference to you if the market averages go up or down?
Michael Anthony: I'm neutral, sir, like any average man.
John Beresford Tipton: Average? Mike, have you ever met an average man?
Michael Anthony: [Puzzled] Well, do you mean ordinary or...
[Anthony is befuddled]
Michael Anthony: I'm not sure, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Well, at least that's any honest answer. The stock market has averages but human beings do not.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire comes out of a picture labeled "Average American Family." But I think you'll find them rather exceptional.


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Virginia Lennart (#3.6)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the garden, where he discovered Tipton seated in a high-backed garden chair] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, how many sunsets would you say there have been since the beginning of time?
Michael Anthony: Hmmm, quite a few, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: That's the thing I admire about nature. No two sunsets are alike, no two people. Each sunset says farewell to the day in a different manner.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see how this person says 'Hello' to a million dollars.
[Tipton gives envelope to Anthony, who accepts it]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Karen Summers (#6.24)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, with only his right arm visible to viewers. On the desk before Tipton is a sort of scale holding two bundles of papers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[pointing to one of the stacks]
John Beresford Tipton: do you recognize that?
[Anthony picks up the bundle to which Tipton had pointed and examines it]
Michael Anthony: Oh, I certainly do, sir. It's a Shakespeare folio.
John Beresford Tipton: It weighs exactly the same as
[pointing to the other]
John Beresford Tipton: 80 cents worth of blank paper. And that folio cost me $300,000. Now tell me - why is one sheaf of paper worth more than the other?
[Anthony furrows his brow]
John Beresford Tipton: I'll tell you, Mike: words. The world's full of people putting words on paper. But very few of them do as well as William Shakespeare.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, and turn to depart]


"The Millionaire: The Anton Bohrman Story (#3.20)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the trophy room, where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk. Only Tipton's right hand is visible as he operates an ancient torture device] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, down through the ages, there have been those who used force to coerce and control men. This is a Chinese boot
[Anthony glances uncomfortable at the apparatus]
John Beresford Tipton: used by river pirates to learn from their prisoners where they had hidden their gold. Under pressure, some men will confess to anything.
Michael Anthony: [Uneasily] Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: And there are some who will not, no matter what the pressure, no matter what the pain. Even death itself will not force some individuals to betray a principle.
Michael Anthony: That's true, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony] Here's the name of our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Roy Delbridge Story (#4.3)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, examining two goblets. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you know anything about glassware?
Michael Anthony: Enough to know those are valuable pieces of crystal.
John Beresford Tipton: Oh?
[Tipton picks up one goblet and drops it to the floor, where it shatters into dozens of pieces. Anthony is surprised]
John Beresford Tipton: Don't worry, Mike. That was an imitation of this expensive piece. I was merely demonstrating something. The same would go for this one if I dropped it. Even a million dollars couldn't put it together again exactly right.
Michael Anthony: That's true.
[Anthony glances at the broken goblet on the floor]
Michael Anthony: I'll see that it's cleaned up, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Some men's lives are smashed in just the same way. Even a million dollars can't put them back where they were.
Michael Anthony: I'd say that was an exception, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Well, let's take a look at one of these exceptions.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see what Roy Delbridge does with his life.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Karl Miller Story (#5.31)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, viewing an hour glass. Only Tipton's right hand is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Indicating the hour glass] A lot of grains of sand in here, aren't there, Mike?
Michael Anthony: I shouldn't like to count them, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Suppose you had to find just one specific grain in this, Mike? And suppose while you were looking, time was running out.
Michael Anthony: I hope that's not the assignment you have for me, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Do you think a million dollars would help?
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Dixon Cooper (#6.32)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Michael Anthony enters the study of John Beresford Tipton, where he observes Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, pouring a glass of milk from the milk bottle. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, when is it always the darkest?
Michael Anthony: Always the darkest, sir? Well, just before the dawn, I've heard.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, I've heard that, too. Do you remember who said it?
[Tipton takes a sip of milk]
Michael Anthony: Shakespeare said so many things so well, that's always a safe guess.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Probably a good many people have commented on the darkness before the dawn. But I think the best modern authority of the subject would be a milkman.
[Anthony smiles while Tipton hands him an envelope]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and prepares to depart]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Angela Temple (#5.25)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to discover Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at a desk containing numerous examples of ink blots. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Tipton hands a card to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: do you know what this is?
Michael Anthony: [Observing] It's an ink blot, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Oh, a very special ink blot, Mike. One of the original series of standard patterns devised for analyzing personality characteristics. To one person, it is a beautiful butterfly; to another, a funeral wreath.
Michael Anthony: [Wryly] It wasn't the ink blot itself.
[Anthony hands back the card to Tipton]
Michael Anthony: It was obviously what they had on their minds.
John Beresford Tipton: Fear plays strange tricks. It can transform something as innocuous as an ink blot into an object of horror.
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Terrence Costigan Story (#5.17)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Pointing to funhouse mirrors at the side of his desk] Take a look at yourself, Mike.
[Anthony steps before one of them, with an ensuing slight deformation evident]
John Beresford Tipton: Doesn't look much like you, does it?
Michael Anthony: I should hope not, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: But even in that distortion, there is some essence of truth. It's still you. See if that one
[pointing to another mirror]
John Beresford Tipton: is more flattering.
[Anthony moves to a second mirror with extreme misrepresentation of his countenance apparent. Anthony makes silly faces at the reflection. Tipton chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: Don't let it go to your head, Mike. Sometimes, a mirror can do it. Sometimes, fortune, good or bad, can distort a life.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, and turns to depart]


"The Millionaire: The Diane Loring Story (#3.38)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to witness Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, reading a document. Only Tipton's right hand is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, read any good poetry lately?
Michael Anthony: [Slyly smiling] Would you like me to quote you some, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] No, thank you.
[Indicating the document of his desk]
John Beresford Tipton: I'd rather read you a line or two from this Shakespeare folio.
Michael Anthony: I'd like to hear them.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton quotes a query from the Shakespearian character Theseus] "Where is our usual manager of mirth? What revels are in hand? Is there no play to ease the anguish of a torturing hour?"
Michael Anthony: A Midsummer Night's Dream, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes. It is a reminder, perhaps, of how much all of us owe the entertainers of this world.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, our next millionaire is going to be such a performer.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Margaret Stoneham (#6.20)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair reading a book] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I've been reading one of the modern poets. Wonderful - listen to this:
[Tipton reads from the book]
John Beresford Tipton: "The quality of mercy is not strained."
Michael Anthony: Modern poetry? But that's Shakespeare.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Yes, Mike. But he's so modern, we still haven't caught up to him.
[Anthony smiles]
John Beresford Tipton: Yet in the sixteenth century, he wrote about a woman lawyer ending up in court - an equal to the men around her.
Michael Anthony: Portia, the most famous woman lawyer of all time.
John Beresford Tipton: It's still a novelty in today's courts to see a woman standing up in court and arguing her defendant's case. Yes, Shakespeare was ahead of the times when he wrote this. He still is.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Father Gilhooley (#5.22)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton library to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk. Anthony notices a new chair as he walks from the door to Tipton's desk] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Pointing to the new chair]
John Beresford Tipton: A king once sat on that throne.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony turns to observe] Indeed? A real king, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Certainly. Sit in it, Mike.
[Anthony walks over to the throne and sits down]
John Beresford Tipton: Well, feel like a king?
Michael Anthony: I'm not sure I know how a king feels.
John Beresford Tipton: Do you feel comfortable?
Michael Anthony: [Stiffly] Not especially.
John Beresford Tipton: Every man has a chair he feels was just made for him - or he dreams of one.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Eric Lodek Story (#5.15)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the estate kitchen to discover Tipton working at the stove. Tipton is partially obstructed by a particle board with only his right hand visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton is preparing a dish] Mike, do you like crepe suzettes?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony glances at his wristwatch] Not at midnight, sir. I'd never get to sleep.
John Beresford Tipton: Just came across a wonderful new recipe for sauce. Had to try it.
[Tipton lights a flame under the pan]
Michael Anthony: [Sniffing] Smells wonderful.
John Beresford Tipton: I may have put in too much brandy.
[Tipton shakes the pan and contents over the flame]
John Beresford Tipton: The big trick is to get the right temperature.
[Tipton puts the pan down]
John Beresford Tipton: Well, fire is a wonderful thing, Mike. There's so many different kinds of fire. Hot fires - the fires of industry that tempers steel; the fires of adversary that tempers men's spirit.
[Tipton picks up the pan again, shakes it over the flame]
John Beresford Tipton: But it's never safe to play with fire.
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Lee Randolph (#5.12)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton bedroom, where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair and sipping coffee. Anthony bows] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you ever have nightmares?
Michael Anthony: Only after too much curried shrimp, I'm glad to say.
John Beresford Tipton: I had one after I awoke this morning.
Michael Anthony: Awoke this morning, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Scientists say there is one moment between waking and sleeping when you can experience a lifetime of emotion. This morning, there was one second that seemed like years of terror.
Michael Anthony: They also say that those who never have nightmares never have pleasant dreams either.
John Beresford Tipton: Well, Mike, I must confess I'm glad to be awake now, free of doubt and back to my proper place in time.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Nancy Wellington Story (#3.18)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk. Only his right hand is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I want to test your powers of observation.
[Tipton hands a necklace to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I want you to inspect that necklace very closely.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony carefully examines the necklace] It's beautiful, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: It's magnificent.
[Tipton hands Anthony a second necklace]
John Beresford Tipton: Take a look at this.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony scrutinizes the second necklace, then compares them side by side] They're exactly alike.
John Beresford Tipton: Oh, but they're not. The first one belonged to the Empress Maria Theresa; the other is a very skillful copy.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: To tell the truth, by now, I can't remember which is which.
[Anthony returns both necklaces to the desk]
John Beresford Tipton: I doubt if anyone can, with the naked eye. I want you to deliver a million dollars, Mike.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony] Take it to a very charming and lovely lady who owns two necklaces herself - and one is the real thing.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and smiles]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Jim Hayes (#6.6)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, playing Solitaire] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: One moment, Mike. Just one moment.
Michael Anthony: [Perusing the hand on Tipton's desk] Excuse me, sir. If you put the red nine over there on the black ten...
John Beresford Tipton: You know, Mike, you're a very satisfactory person.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony grins] Well, sir, I just happened to...
John Beresford Tipton: One of the rules of Solitaire, which you have just so ably demonstrated, is that
[Tipton's voice becomes irritated]
John Beresford Tipton: it is impossible to play without a second person barging in and pointing out the most obvious move.
Michael Anthony: [Taken aback] Oh.
John Beresford Tipton: However, if I ignore your disastrous suggestion and move this instead,
[Tipton moves a row of cards]
John Beresford Tipton: I can do this,
[Tipton moves another row of cards]
John Beresford Tipton: and the game is almost over. That's another rule of Solitaire, Mike: when the cards are all up, the game is over.
Michael Anthony: I imagine a good many other games follow that pattern, don't they, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: But suppose they don't, Mike. Suppose two people start playing a game, then can't figure out how to stop playing.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Story of Martha Crockett (#4.21)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the music room, containing various instruments, including a cello and a harp, to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair at a desk and playing a violin. Only Tipton's hands are visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Recognize this violin
[handing the violin to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: , Mike?
Michael Anthony: [Receiving the instrument, beaming] Yes, sir. When I was a boy, it was my dream to play a Stradivarius someday.
[Anthony raises the violin in its customary place on a musician's shoulder and plinks two notes, smiling widely]
John Beresford Tipton: That's right - you did play the violin at one time, didn't you?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir - a very short time.
[Anthony looks longingly at the instrument]
John Beresford Tipton: Oh? Unfortunate. No finances, Mike?
Michael Anthony: [Handing back the violin with a sheepish grin] No, sir. No talent.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] An honest answer, Mike. You are a realist.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I'm wondering if our next millionaire will be a realist, especially when given the power to make a dream come true.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Luke Fortune Story (#1.15)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Tipton is seen sitting atop a horse. Only his back from the shoulders down is visible to viewers. Anthony is standing on the ground beside the animal] I'll get those cables off at once, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Good.
[Tipton reaches into his pocket and retrieves an envelope, which he hands to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: And here's another chores for you, Mike. Let's make this buckaroo a millionaire.
[Chuckles. Anthony accepts the envelope as Tipton rides off]


"The Millionaire: The Ruth Ferris Story (#4.7)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton estate laboratory, where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair examining some ore] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, both of these lumps of crude ore came from the same Alaskan gold mine. On site, they appear to be twins. But one is real gold and the other merely iron pyrite.
Michael Anthony: Fool's gold. All that glitters is not gold.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Very good. Now,
[Indicating the ores]
John Beresford Tipton: take your choice.
Michael Anthony: Well, I'm not an expert, sir, but
[Pointing]
Michael Anthony: I'll take a chance on that one.
John Beresford Tipton: That's right. It's real gold.
[Anthony smiles]
John Beresford Tipton: But your selection could still be worthless, Mike. The true glitter depends on what you do with it. In the final analysis, it's the human element which creates the real value. Man's choice between good and evil.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see how the next million dollar gift affects the human will.


"The Millionaire: The Salvatore Buonarotti Story (#3.14)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Viewers see Anthony enter the library, where he discovers Tipton seated in a high backed chair with only his left arm visible. Tipton has a document in his lap] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, have you been sleeping well lately? Any dreams?
Michael Anthony: None that I can think of, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Oh, that's a shame.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: I was just looking through this original manuscript
[Tipton hands the document to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: on the interpretation of dreams.
[Anthony smiles]
John Beresford Tipton: One of Dr. Freud's first.
Michael Anthony: [Perusing the manuscript] Very interesting, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Well, you can agree or disagree as to these interpretations but you cannot deny that man has them.
[Anthony returns the document to Tipton]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see what stuff our next millionaire's dreams are made of.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony, who accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: The Maggie Sheeler Story (#3.31)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, reading a book. Only Tipton's left hand, holding the book, is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I've been tangling with the great mystery.
Michael Anthony: A detective story, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Closing the book and laying it on the desk] No, the mystery of love and the complications of human relationships.
Michael Anthony: Those are rather large problems, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I don't know, Mike. Love is not a mathematical equation. Human nature is not something you can weigh or measure. Even when you understand it, there are surprises.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here is the name of another new millionaire. Let's see if she can solve at least part of the mystery.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Joe Seaton Story (#2.3)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the library to discover Tipton, seated in a high backed chair, reading a newspaper. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Do you do much reading, Mike?
Michael Anthony: I'm afraid not, sir - not as much as I would like.
John Beresford Tipton: You should, Mike. Much of life's drama comes from books, you know. Not only books, but, take for instance, the personal column in the daily newspaper.
[Tipton hands his newspaper to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Read the ad I have marked.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony reads the ad aloud] "Young man will perform any service that is legal and moral for $1000." I see what you mean, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Follow this up, Mike.
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: This young man is our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts envelope]


"The Millionaire: The Vickie Lawson Story (#1.21)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to observe Tipton seated at a desk examining his mounted butterfly collection. Tipton is off-camera with only his hands visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Know anything about butterflies, Mike?
Michael Anthony: Only the usual I'm afraid, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Indicating one mounted specimen] This beautiful creature has a lot to teach some people, Mike. It began in the gray prison of a chrysippus and grew into a beauty when it dared to face the world outside.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's the name of another millionaire. Let's see if she'll dare to break through to beauty.


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Timothy Mackail (#6.15)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters an electrical shop on the Silverstone estate to discover Tipton tinkering with a meter] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton indicates the meter] Mike, did you ever see how these things work?
Michael Anthony: A taxi meter, sir? Well, no, I've never taken one of them apart.
[Anthony gives a slight smile]
Michael Anthony: But they've certainly taken a lot from me.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Very interesting how they click off the minutes and the miles, charging for both time and distance. Sometimes, a short ride, a few miles, a few minutes can change a person's entire life.
[Tipton pushes a button on the meter and a receipt discharges]
John Beresford Tipton: And now it's time to pay up.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony smiles and nods]


"The Millionaire: The Nora Paul Story (#2.9)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony has been summoned during World Series time, and he enters the study to find Tipton, seated in a high backed chair, bouncing a baseball up and down in his left hand, which is the only part of his body visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Tell me, Mike, did you see today's ballgame on TV?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir. Quite a game.
John Beresford Tipton: Have you stopped to consider what important factor decided the series?
Michael Anthony: If I remember correctly, sir, it was a sacrifice hit.
John Beresford Tipton: Precisely. How akin to ballplayers we humans are. Some always trying for that home run and invariably striking out. Some for sacrificing so that others can make home plate.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here is the name of another millionaire.


"The Millionaire: The Quentin Harwood Story (#1.13)" (1955)
John Beresford Tipton: [Anthony enters the laboratory to witness Tipton working on a scientific experiment. Tipton is off-camera with only his hands visible to the viewers as he moves powder around] The essence of drama, Mike, is a situation where a person is faced with the unexpected and the unfamiliar. Like taking a fish out of water. What does the fish do?
Michael Anthony: Darwin's Theory of Evolution says the fish develops lungs because lungs would be necessary for survival.
John Beresford Tipton: Ah, then under the pressure of necessity, we sometimes achieve the impossible.
Michael Anthony: That's another way of saying we reach our own Heaven, Mr. Tipton.
John Beresford Tipton: Maybe having a million dollars would be Heaven to one person - but to another?
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: This Quentin Harwood, Mike, I think might be very like a fish out of water with my million dollar gift.


"The Millionaire: The Joey Diamond Story (#3.8)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters Tipton's photographic lab where he finds Tipton sitting in a high-backed chair at a table, going through a stack of several photos. Tipton is wearing a lab coat with only his right arm visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Tipton displays two photos to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: here are two parts of a photograph. One is a positive and the other is just the opposite of what one expects the final product to be. We call it the negative. In a way, people are like that - some positive, some negative. It'll be interesting to see what a million dollars
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: will do to one of the negatives of the human race.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Maureen Reynolds (#6.7)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair, perusing a postage stamp album] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, did you ever collect stamps?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir, when I was a boy. I considered myself quite an authority.
John Beresford Tipton: Look at this one.
[Tipton hands Anthony an envelope with a stamp affixed]
John Beresford Tipton: It's quite valuable.
Michael Anthony: [Through furrowed brow] But I've seen a lot of these, sir. What's so rare about this one?
John Beresford Tipton: I didn't say it was rare, Mike. I said it was valuable. To me, it brought me some wonderful news, many years ago.
Michael Anthony: [Smiling] Oh, I see.
John Beresford Tipton: Very valuable. You know, Mike, sometimes a stamp and a letter can change a whole life.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Kathy Munson Story (#3.1)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton garden, to find Tipton cultivating two seedlings] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I wanted you to see my two fine trees.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony glances at the seedlings]
John Beresford Tipton: They are a phenomenon of nature, formed from a single seed - twins. I've carefully separated them, giving them each an equal chance for survival.
Michael Anthony: Is their survival in doubt, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Well, we hope not. But if one is weak, then we'll try to help it.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's a check for a million dollars, Mike, for a young lady who did not receive her share of thanks.


"The Millionaire: The Amy Moore Story (#1.1)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Directly facing the viewers from his office] My name is Michael Anthony. There are 2,400,000,000 people in this world. Nineteen of them are worth $500,000,000 or more. I worked as Executive Secretary for one of these men. His name was John Beresford Tipton. He was a bachelor. He was a billionaire. You never heard of John Beresford Tipton. He avoided publicity - bought and paid for privacy. He is now dead.
[Camera pans the extensive gardens of the Tipton estate grounds. Workman are raking, weeding, hoeing and planting]
Michael Anthony: This is Silverstone, the 60,000 acre estate from which John Beresford Tipton ran his world-wide empire. Again, seclusion.
[Anthony is again in his office]
Michael Anthony: These reports,
[Anthony holds up several folders]
Michael Anthony: which could only be revealed after his death, are complete. Each one tells the story of what happened when John Beresford Tipton gave someone $1,000,000. That's right - $1,000,000. I'll never forget one day when I was called into the Old Man's study. He was toying with an ivory chessman.
[Anthony enters the study and discovers Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, with a chessboard before him. Tipton is smoking a cigar. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to the viewers]
Michael Anthony: You called me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: You know, Mike, these chessman were the first luxury I allowed myself.
Michael Anthony: [Smiles] An excellent relaxation, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I've just decided to make my hobby a chess game - with human beings.
Michael Anthony: [Startled] Human beings, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: I'm going to choose a number of people for my chess game and give each one $1,000,000.
Michael Anthony: A million dollars?
John Beresford Tipton: The bank will issue the checks. I've told McMahon at the bank he'll hear from you. No one is to ever know that I am the donor.
Michael Anthony: What about McMahon? He'd know.
John Beresford Tipton: McMahon is president of the bank and he'll only know what I want him to know. I want a complete report on what happens to each person's life - in writing. I don't care how you get it. Now, here are the rest of the instructions.
[Tipton hands the instructions to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's chessman #1 -
[Tipton chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: she gets $1,000,000.
Michael Anthony: [Back in his own office] To this day, I don't know how Mr. Tipton selected his chessman. The first was a woman - Amy Moore.


"The Millionaire: The David Tremayne Story (#3.9)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Viewers see Michael Anthony enter the Tipton library where he discovers Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk and holding up for scrutiny a paper document. Only Tipton's left arm is visible] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Showing document to Anthony] You know what this is, Mike?
Michael Anthony: It looks like an old theater program of some sorts.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles and hands document to Anthony] No, it's one of the original ballots that elected Abraham Lincoln in 1860.
Michael Anthony: [Carefully reviewing the ballot, Anthony is fascinated] Very interesting.
John Beresford Tipton: The ballot system of voting is part of our American way of life and political machines spring into being in an attempt to control the ballot. To fight a political machine would see sometimes as foolhardy as David fighting Goliath.
[Anthony returns the ballot to the desk. Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I want you to give this to a modern day David and see how he would use a million dollars.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, smiles, and bows]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire John Hardin (#2.16)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Michael Anthony enters a science room on the Tipton estate, where he observes John Beresford Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, handling a small round plastic object. Only Tipton's arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Handing over the plastic object to Anthony] Mike, have you ever seen one of these?
Michael Anthony: [Examining the object] Why, it seems to be a plastic gift.
John Beresford Tipton: I was referring to what's inside of it.
Michael Anthony: [Still inspecting the object] It looks like an ordinary mustard seed, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: It is a mustard seed, Mike. But its significance is far from ordinary.
[Picks up a religious book]
John Beresford Tipton: In this book, a man named Matthew reported his teacher saying, "If you have faith in this mustard seed, nothing shall be impossible unto you."
Michael Anthony: Yes, I know the quotation well.
John Beresford Tipton: We are surviving, but too often we forget, like having a signed cashier's check in our hand and forgetting to cash it. Speaking of a check,
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: here's one for our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: The Russell Herbert Story (#3.19)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a garden of sorts filled with many caged tropical birds. He sees Tipton seated in a high backed wicker chair with only his right arm visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, have you finished cataloging my tropical birds?
Michael Anthony: I have the list right here.
[Anthony reaches into his pocket, produces the inventory and places it on a round, glass table before Tipton]
John Beresford Tipton: Good. And what, if anything, did you learn from all of this?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony wrinkles his brow. It is evident from both this request and previously aired dialog that he found this assignment less than pleasant] Well, for one thing,
[Pointing to a bird]
Michael Anthony: that's the scarlet macaw -
[in Latin]
Michael Anthony: ara macao.
[Pointing to another bird]
Michael Anthony: This is a particularly fine specimen of a yellow-headed Amazon parrot -
[in Latin]
Michael Anthony: Amazona oratrix. Over here,
[Pointing to yet another bird]
Michael Anthony: - should I continue, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] No, you've convinced me that you should get along with Russell Herbert.
[Anthony furrows his brow quizzically]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike - also one of the greatest bird painters in the world.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
Michael Anthony: I see. Where do I find him?
John Beresford Tipton: That's going to be a bit of a problem. Herbert is a recluse - a man of mystery. No one knows what he looks like or where he lives except his business representative - a man named Jonathon Noble.
Michael Anthony: If I may say so, sir, you're not giving me much to go on.
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, find Noble, and through him, you may find Russell Herbert. My last report what that he is somewhere in the Hawaiian Islands.
[Anthony places the envelope in his suit coat pocket and turns to depart]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Marjorie Martinson (#4.16)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to observe Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk with only his left arm visible to the viewers. As he approaches his employer, Anthony notes a large astrology chart on the wall and the fact that the curtain is open to the window, revealing that it is evening under a clear, starry sky. Tipton has a large telescope near his desk] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: You know, Mike, I sometimes wonder if the stars don't play a part in the destinies of humans.
Michael Anthony: [Wryly] People have been wondering that for centuries, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: The ebb and flow of the tides, the ups and downs of individuals - they sometimes seem to follow a comparable pattern.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see if this check will help a fallen star rise again.
Michael Anthony: [Accepting and reviewing the information on the envelope] Hollywood!
[Anthony smiles, bows, and turns to depart]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire John Rackham (#5.21)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton estate art gallery to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair examining a piece of East Indian art] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you remember what Rudyard Kipling said?
Michael Anthony: He said quite a few things, sir - about thirty volumes full.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Yes.
[Reciting]
John Beresford Tipton: "Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet." Kipling wrote that many years ago. I wonder if he's say that today?
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Jay Powers Story (#3.11)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Viewers see Anthony approaching Tipton, who is hidden behind a pillar with only his right arm visible. Tipton is mixing a salad on a salad cart] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you know the secret of a good salad?
Michael Anthony: [Apprehensively] I'm not sure that I do know, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Enough but not too much. That's the secret.
[Tipton continues to prepare the salad, twisting a pepper mill]
John Beresford Tipton: Just enough pepper.
[Anthony hands Tipton a small bowl with lemon slices]
John Beresford Tipton: Just enough lemon juice.
[Tipton drops in some basil]
John Beresford Tipton: Just enough basil.
[Tipton stops]
John Beresford Tipton: That's the secret to a good life, too: enough work, enough play, enough love, enough money.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony] Let's see if this person thinks a million dollars is enough.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: The Rip Matson Story (#2.24)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony has been told that Tipton wishes to see him. Anthony locates his employer at a brook that runs through part of the Silverstone Estate. Tipton is fishing off-camera with only his hands visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Displaying a wriggling fish that he has just pulled from a net] Look at this fellow, Mike. Only 14 ounces of pure, undiluted courage.
Michael Anthony: [Smiling] Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton tosses the fish back into the stream] Heroes are of many breeds, Mike. The anatomy of courage is something that has always defied dissection.
[Tipton removes an envelope from his coat pocket]
John Beresford Tipton: Still, it's possible that this envelope contains a sharp and powerful scalpel that will uncover many hidden things.
[Tipton hands the envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's the name of our new millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: The William Vaughan Story (#5.8)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton estate garden, to find Tipton, whose body is concealed from the viewers by a huge garden statue, observing a large caged bird] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, look at our new little pet.
Michael Anthony: It's a vulture, isn't it, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, a vulture. This one's from Africa, but we have them in America, too.
Michael Anthony: They're certainly ugly, aren't they?
John Beresford Tipton: As ugly as the qualities they symbolize: Greed, voracious, eagerness for life to end so their feast may begin. Sometimes, they're so greedy, they don't even want to wait until their victim is dead.
[Tipton reaches into his pocket, pulls out an envelope and hands it over to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs, eager to get away from the vulture]


"The Millionaire: The Doris Winslow Story (#4.19)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, where he observes Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, handling a miniature gold crown. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you remember the story of King Midas?
Michael Anthony: Oh, yes, indeed, sir. Everything he touched turned to gold.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes. He was so greedy for money that he petitioned the gods for the Midas Touch. But he found, like many men, that great wealth is a mixed blessing. It brings a lot of problems with it.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see what this fortune will bring.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Susan Johnson (#6.28)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, with a phonograph record player and a miniature roulette wheel on his desk beside each other. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Indicating the roulette wheel] What's your pleasure, Mike?
Michael Anthony: [Thinking] Eleven Black.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton spins the wheel. It stops] Nine Red. You lose, Mike.
[Indicating the record player and the wheel]
John Beresford Tipton: These two have a lot in common, besides the fact that they both spin. People sometimes stake as much on the spin of a record as they do on the spin of the wheel.
Michael Anthony: I'm not certain I follow you, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Some people gamble their hopes and their futures on the success of a record. As with the roulette wheel, sometimes they win, sometimes they lose.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Barbara Lydon Story (#4.13)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair, manipulating an astronomy device. Only his right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I've always been fascinated by the fact that we see the same side of the moon. What do you think the other side looks like, Mike?
Michael Anthony: Well, I'd assume it's pretty much like the kind we can see.
John Beresford Tipton: Precisely.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: Yet until they see that for themselves, there are people who'd never be sure they haven't missed something wonderful.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike. Maybe this will expose the unknown face of the moon.


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Katherine Boland (#6.30)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Entering study] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, what does this book represent to you?
[Hands volume to Anthony]
Michael Anthony: [Examining book and returning it to Tipton] Well, sir, it's a type of directory.
John Beresford Tipton: A very special type directory, Mike - the Social Register. Now, what's this book?
[Hands a second volume to Anthony]
Michael Anthony: [Examining book and returning it to Tipton] That's "Who's Who" - a listing of very prominent people.
John Beresford Tipton: These two books represent the ultimate of a great many people. A name listed in one isn't necessarily listed in the other. But those names printed in both are to be reckoned with, eh?
[Gives envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts envelope, bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Robert Croft Story (#2.2)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a room that has a large number of stones, rocks, granite, marbles, and pebbles where he discovers Tipton seated, off screen, holding one of these objects. Only Tipton's hand is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Holding up the object] Mike, take this rock. Doesn't look like much, does it?
Michael Anthony: No, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Indicating a second rock] Nor this. But watch, Mike.
[Tipton chuckles and holds up the second rock and switches on a Geiger counter, which immediately begins to click]
John Beresford Tipton: You see, Mike, without the Geiger counter, we might think this is just another stone. With it, there is a hidden greatness that makes a mere rock priceless uranium.
[Tipton turns off the Geiger counter]
John Beresford Tipton: Men can lose sight of something inside them, Mike, and there is no instrument to remind them of what they have.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: This man has lost faith in himself. Maybe a million dollars can help him find it, Mike.


"The Millionaire: The Laura Hunter Story (#4.5)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, examining a wooden horse. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Indicating the horse]
John Beresford Tipton: this represents one of the most unusual gifts in history.
Michael Anthony: The Trojan Horse, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: The original horse was supposed to be several stories high - a gift from the Greeks to the city of Troy.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir. The Greek soldiers hidden inside the huge wooden horse emerged and destroyed the city.
John Beresford Tipton: So we must conclude that a gift is only as beneficial as the way it is used.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Watch our next millionaire closely, Mike. Let me know how well she uses her gift.
[Anthony accepts and envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Carol Wesley Story (#3.32)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a sort of hothouse and sees Tipton seated in a high backed rattan chair next to a small table with some leaves and sand on it. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: He solved the problem in his own primitive way, Mike.
Michael Anthony: Sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Pointing to the table] There.
[a chameleon scampers under a leaf to hide]
Michael Anthony: Oh, a chameleon. I didn't see him, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: That's the idea. Protective coloration blending in with the ever changing background of life.
Michael Anthony: A case in point, sir: to survive, we must all adapt ourselves to change.
John Beresford Tipton: A case in point. However, Mike, with the human animal, it's no longer just a struggle for physical survival, but a struggle for emotional fulfillment.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see how our next millionaire adapts to change.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, glances at the chameleon, and departs]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Doctor Joseph Frye (#6.5)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to find Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, reading a newspaper, the banner headline of which reads 'Fight Against Inflation.' Only Tipton's right hand is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you remember when a loaf of bread costs five cents?
Michael Anthony: I'm afraid I do, sir. Now it's five times as much. Oh, the cost of living.
John Beresford Tipton: The cost of living. It's interesting, isn't it, that we talk so much about the cost of living and so little about the value of life.
Michael Anthony: I suppose most of us take it for granted.
John Beresford Tipton: There are some men who can't do that. Every day, they realize the great value of life and fight for it.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, smiles, and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Irene Marshall Story (#5.18)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at a table, pouring two glasses of water from a carafe on a tray. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Indicating one of the glasses] Drink that, will you, Mike?
[Anthony picks up a glass and raises it to his lips]
John Beresford Tipton: Of course, I must warn you, it's poisoned.
[Anthony stops]
Michael Anthony: Poisoned?
[Anthony relaxes and smiles]
Michael Anthony: Oh, you wouldn't do such a thing, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: If you're convinced of that, go ahead and drink.
[Anthony looks at the glass and mulls it over]
John Beresford Tipton: You realize, of course, that by refusing to drink, you're as much as saying I'm capable of murder. Well, Mike, how about it?
[Anthony thinks it over again, then drinks a sip. Tipton chuckles and reaches for the other glass and drinks it all down. Anthony does the same with his glass and set it on the tray]
John Beresford Tipton: Sometimes, it's hard to tell what to believe, isn't it, Mike?
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, and turns to leave]


"The Millionaire: The Cobb Marley Story (#1.22)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters an outdoor area to witness Tipton working on his miniature Japanese rock garden. Tipton is off-camera with only his gloved hands visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Look at this miniature garden, Mike. Peaceful, isn't it?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Yet with a gesture,
[picks up a toy tree]
John Beresford Tipton: I can uproot this toy tree and replant it elsewhere.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see what happens when this person is uprooted from his normal, daily routine by a million dollars.


"The Millionaire: The Jack Garrison Story (#4.33)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a room that Tipton philosophically calls his "Laboratory of Truth." Tipton is seated in a high backed chair with only his right hand, which is holding a test tube, visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, ever heard of inee?
Michael Anthony: Inee?
John Beresford Tipton: [Indicating the test tube he is holding] That's inee in the tube. A rather remarkable substance, Mike. It looks innocent enough but it's actually a deadly poison. Certain South American Indian tribes use it most effectively on the tips of arrows.
Michael Anthony: Oh, yes, sir. I have read about it. And isn't it true that doctors have discovered other uses for it? That, in some cases, it also saves lives?
John Beresford Tipton: That's right, Mike. I was just reflecting on the fact that the destroyer sometimes works as a savior.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Sergeant Matthew Brogan (#6.10)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to observe Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, examining a box containing several different U.S. military medals. Only Tipton's left hand is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: You were in the Army, Mike - or was it the Navy?
Michael Anthony: Navy, sir.
[Indicating the box of medals]
Michael Anthony: But they didn't pin that many metals on me.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] These aren't mine. All they pinned on me was guard duty, KP and a few memories. I had a sergeant though...
Michael Anthony: [Smiling and gently interrupting] I know what you mean, sir. Everyone in the Army seems to remember one sergeant.
John Beresford Tipton: I suppose there are still a few of them left.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Dan Larsen Story (#3.37)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton library, where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair and sitting at his desk. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to the viewers. Tipton is smoking a cigar and is handling a pocket watch] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, this is a railroad watch - as close to absolute accuracy as a watch can be made. Something no locomotive engineer conductor would function very well without. To such men, punctuality is as important as the steady beat of the human heart.
Michael Anthony: Quite correct, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] I know someone else, not a railroad man at all, to whom punctuality is a fetish.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I'm curious to discover, Mike, if perhaps a million dollars might alter this human clock's rigid manner of existence.
[Anthony smiles and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Peter Bartley Story (#4.17)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair, reading the Bible. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: You know, Mike, there are many reasons why the Bible has always been the best seller of all time: for it's profound, enduring religious importance, but also because it's a collection of the greatest stories in all the world.
Michael Anthony: That it is indeed, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I have just been reading the story of a dreamer and a colt of many colors: the Story of Joseph and his Brethren.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire is a brother - no Joseph, of course, but he has already endured a considerable trial, not to mention many adventures.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Sandy Newell (#6.22)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, reading a book] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Just a moment, Mike. Listen to this:
[Tipton reads from the book]
John Beresford Tipton: "How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love thee to the depth and breadth and height my soul can reach." You know the poem, of course.
Michael Anthony: Elizabeth Barrett Browning - one of my favorite sonnets.
John Beresford Tipton: It tells of a love larger than life and longer than time, Mike, how strong is love? Is love really as sturdy and brave as we say it is?
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Alicia Osante (#5.26)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the library to discover Tipton, seated in a high backed chair, listening to a record of a man articulating phrases in Spanish, such as "Buenas dias, Senior Garcia." Only Tipton's left arm is visible as he reaches to turn off the record player] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Buenas tardes, Miguel.
Michael Anthony: I beg your pardon, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] A greeting, Mike. "Good afternoon."
Michael Anthony: Good afternoon, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, would you say it's a good thing for a person to be confiado?
Michael Anthony: Confiado, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton hands Anthony a book] Here's a Spanish-English dictionary, Mike. You'd better look it up.
[Spelling]
John Beresford Tipton: C-O-N-F-I-A-D-O.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony pages through the dictionary] It means "trusting", sir.
John Beresford Tipton: That's right. A good quality in any language.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton indicates the dictionary] You'd better take that, Mike. You may need it.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire. Buena suerte, Miguel.
Michael Anthony: [as he accepts envelope] Hasta la vista, señor.
[Anthony bows as he turns to leave]
John Beresford Tipton: I should have known.
[Chuckles. Anthony gives a slight backward wry smile as he walks to the door]


"The Millionaire: The Jerome Wilson Story (#2.8)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the African Room, where he is momentarily surprised, then smiles, to see Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, wearing a headdress. Viewers see Tipton from behind the chair with only his hands visible] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles as he removes the headdress] I see it's enough to startle even you, Mike. This is the headdress of a witch doctor - one of the remote tribes in the Upper Zambezi. Ever seen one?
Michael Anthony: Only pictures of them, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: In the long run, it's just a mask, Mike. We all wear them in one form or another.
Michael Anthony: Yes, Mr. Tipton.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony] Especially our next millionaire. You'll find him in a remote jungle called New York.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and smiles]


"The Millionaire: The Ed Murdock Story (#2.31)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the garden to find Tipton, hidden from viewers behind a hedge, pruning some flowers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, glad you're here.
[Tipton displays some flowers]
John Beresford Tipton: Beautiful, aren't they?
Michael Anthony: Very. First of the season?
John Beresford Tipton: First to survive, let us say, Mike. These are the ones who struggled against their enemies, such as the weeds. You know, Mike, men have their weeds, too. We call them temptations. It's a never-ending battle - man against his weeds.
Michael Anthony: We call the score of that contest the measure of a man's character.
John Beresford Tipton: I would.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here, Mike. You might get a chance to see such a contest yourself when you deliver this to our next millionaire.


"The Millionaire: The Story of Jane Costello (#2.30)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the library of Tipton, who is seated in a high-backed chair listening to a recording] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, you'll see I've been making a marriage here tonight.
Michael Anthony: A marriage, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Of words and music. Romeo and Juliet. Tchaikovsky's music.
Michael Anthony: It's very beautiful, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: An immortal love story, Mike. Romeo and Juliet. Today they'd be called teenagers. I wonder what would happen if the Romeo and Juliet story were told in our time.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I want you to deliver a million dollars.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony smiles]


"The Millionaire: The Eric Vincent Story (#2.26)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Michael Anthony enters John Beresford Tipton's carpentry shop] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton turns off lathe] Mike, the shape of things, and of men, is determined by the amount of pressure you put on them - or lack of pressure.
[Tipton displays a wooden dowel to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: See what I mean?
Michael Anthony: Well, yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Harsh financial pressure has made financial giants out of some men, thieves out of others. And lack of pressure has allowed men leisure for philosophy and research or it has made them wasteful.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's take the pressure off this man and see what happens.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony accepts envelope] Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I want a close account on this man's life, Mike.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony bows and departs while Tipton turns the lathe back on]


"The Millionaire: The Carl Bronson Story (#4.4)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters an outdoor garden to find Tipton seated on a high backed wicker chair with a round glass table before him, on which there is a large bowl of water. Tipton is handling a paper object and only his hands are visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[indicating the paper object in his hand]
John Beresford Tipton: have you ever seen one of these?
Michael Anthony: A Japanese paper flower, isn't it, sir? It's fun to watch them unfold when they are immersed in water.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton places the paper flower into the bowl of water] A man's life should be like that: unfolding gradually until, finally, there it is, in full perfection. But if something goes wrong, never develops properly and the man himself remains closed up.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike. I want to see what happens when a man like that gets another chance - to grow.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Peter Marlowe Story (#4.2)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair with only his left arm visible to the viewers. To Tipton's left is a five-pointed star wheel] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you believe a man under hypnosis can actually go back into his past and re-live it?
Michael Anthony: I'm certainly no authority, sir, but I do know such claims have been made.
John Beresford Tipton: I've been making some experiments in hypnotic science. Watch.
[Tipton turns on a bright light beside him and shines the star wheel directly into the face of Anthony]
Michael Anthony: [after a few moments of the light and wheel having a hypnotic effect on him, Anthony shakes it off] Huh, very intriguing.
John Beresford Tipton: There's another little experiment I'd like to try, substituting, however, a million dollars for the hypnotic trance.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Sally Simms (#5.29)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters an outdoor garden setting, where he discovers Tipton, hidden from the viewers by a large plant, wearing garden gloves, tending to some roses] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, ever see Good Queen Bess?
Michael Anthony: [Wryly] That was a little before my time, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles. Tipton displays a rose for Anthony] Mike, this is a Good Queen Bess.
Michael Anthony: [Slightly bowing and addressing the rose] Your Majesty.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton picks up another flower] And this is a White Princess. Many varieties. Just came today.
[Tipton hands the flower to Anthony, who takes it]
Michael Anthony: Very handsome.
[Anthony pricks his finger and hands the flower back to Tipton]
John Beresford Tipton: Tell me - which one do you like better? The budding one or the one in full bloom?
Michael Anthony: Can you admire them both equally, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: But in some cases, a choice is necessary.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaires.
Michael Anthony: Millionaires?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, Mike. There are two.
[Anthony bows and leaves]


"The Millionaire: The John Richards Story (#4.22)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to observe Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk examining an old class photo in a school yearbook from decades before. Only Tipton's hands are visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I was just paying a visit to the past.
[Tipton shows Anthony the photograph in the yearbook. Anthony smiles. Tipton chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: You must have one of these.
Michael Anthony: [Beaming, as he reviews the picture] I should say I have, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Now, Mike, don't you smile. You might be a good many years younger than I am, but I'll wager you look just as silly in your class picture.
[Anthony grins broadly]
John Beresford Tipton: However, those years were the most important of my life.
Michael Anthony: [Returning the book] I'd say they were the most important in any boy's life.
John Beresford Tipton: I agree.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I agree so completely, Mike, that I've picked our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Harvey Borden Story (#3.12)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Viewers see Anthony enter the library to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk with only his left arm visible. He is reviewing several catalogs] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Tipton hands over the catalogs to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I want your opinion of these books.
Michael Anthony: [Paging through the items] Why, they're catalogs, sir, showing the advanced styling for next year. Cars, milk cartons, window sashes - everything under the sun.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Precisely. Now how do you suppose the people who plan for next year can tell in advance what the public taste will be?
Michael Anthony: [Returning the catalogs to Tipton's desk] I'm sure I don't know, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I want to find out how a planning mind works.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's the name of a successful young industrial designer. Give him one million dollars.


"The Millionaire: The Tony Drummond Story (#4.28)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a room which Tipton calls his 'Laboratory of Truth.' Tipton is seated in a high backed chair, smoking a cigar, and examining a scale model of a housing development. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, this is a familiar site in America today - the modern housing development. Neat, well-planned houses and an attractive shopping center. The new style: Country Towne. It takes a lot of imagination to build a good one, Mike.
Michael Anthony: And a lot of hard work.
John Beresford Tipton: Those that are built with care can be a dream come true for the people that live in them, and for the men who build them.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Peggy Demos Story (#2.7)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [It's 1950. Anthony enters the dressing room of Tipton's private suite, where the valet is just leaving after having placed a towel over Tipton's face. Tipton is only visible to viewers from behind] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, are you familiar with Gilbert and Sullivan?
Michael Anthony: Oh, yes, sir. I once belonged to a choral group which met once a month and sang the Gilbert and Sullivan scores.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Ah, I'll bet you were a first rate Nanki-Poo.
Michael Anthony: [Somberly] No, sir, I was the Lord High Executioner.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Mike, this police action in Korea seems to be, in a limited way, one of the worst yet. Today's headlines give terrific bite to one of Gilbert's line, "I'll take one consideration with another."
Michael Anthony: A policeman's lot is not a happy one.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes. These young, global policemen, who are fighting for all of us over in Korea, for them is not a happy one.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's the name of our new millionaire.


"The Millionaire: The Nancy Marlborough Story (#1.8)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters Tipton's workshop to find Tipton playing with a miniature model of a circus. Tipton is off camera with only his right arm visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: The circus never ceases to amaze me, Mike. Comedy and tragedy under the big top, right here in my own house.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players. I'm curious to find out what sort of a part will be played by
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: this player, with a million dollars to spend.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: Ralph the Cat (#5.9)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Michael Anthony enters a study to find John Beresford Tipton seated in a high backed chair examining figures and statues of ancient Egyptian relics. Only Tipton's right hand to visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, did you know this cat
[Tipton points to a statue]
John Beresford Tipton: was very important to the ancient Egyptians?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir. I read that cats even played a part in their theology.
John Beresford Tipton: That's right. This is a figure of Bastet, the cat goddess. But to the Egyptians, all cats were sacred. Almost every household had one. That's how they came to be domestic pets.
Michael Anthony: Domestic pets?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles as he hands an envelope to Anthony] Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, and turns to depart]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Jackson Greene (#6.14)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, did you ever grow a beard?
Michael Anthony: Well, yes, in a way.
John Beresford Tipton: Oh? What way?
Michael Anthony: Well, I started one - but it grew in red.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] You know, Mike, a beard was once a mark of dignity, prestige, age. Today, it's a badge of youth.
Michael Anthony: And of the beatnik, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] That's right, Mike. Some are beat because they're defeated. Others are beat because they like to beat a drum.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike. And Mike, perhaps if you deliver that with a beard, you won't be taken for a square.
[Anthony gives the comment a brief thought, nods, and departs]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Ted McAllister (#3.36)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a Tipton laboratory where Tipton studies weather conditions. Tipton is standing behind a pillar, with only his left arm visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Pointing to a Swiss Chalet weather device]
John Beresford Tipton: the little man says we're in for a storm.
Michael Anthony: Oh?
[Anthony walks over to the device and pokes the little figure]
Michael Anthony: There's a very starry sky outside. Can you depend on him?
John Beresford Tipton: Well, that barometer agrees with him. And it's the most respected instrument I know - except for man, whose responses to a change in pressure are so unpredictable that no one can measure them. Let's see what response there is to this.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The William Courtney Story (#5.16)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a sort of museum of history, which contains four figures in suits of armor. Anthony glances at an empty, high-backed chair and looks around the room but sees no one. He tentatively asks] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [One of the figures in a suit of armor, visor down, steps off a riser onto the floor and approaches Anthony] Yes, Mike?
Michael Anthony: Mr. Tipton!
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] This just came today
[meaning the suit of armor]
John Beresford Tipton: and I couldn't resist to see how it felt to be a medieval man.
Michael Anthony: Well, what's it like?
John Beresford Tipton: I must admit I feel the weight of the ages - the heavy load of years of tradition.
Michael Anthony: It does seem to make your progress difficult, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, tradition usually holds back progress.
[Tipton points to desk]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony retrieves an envelope and studies the name of the recipient]
John Beresford Tipton: But first, you better get me out of this.
[Anthony places the envelope in his suit pocket]
Michael Anthony: [Anthony steps to Tipton and tries to dislodge the suit's headpiece] I'll do my best, sir.


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Marcia Forrest (#5.27)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the library to find Tipton standing on a ladder to access a book on a bookshelf. The camera is shooting the scene from the back side of the bookshelf so that, while Tipton is largely obscured from the viewers by other books on the shelf, the viewers can nevertheless see much more of his manifestation than usual] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, how many rungs are there on the ladder to success?
Michael Anthony: [Smiling] You should know the answer to that better than I, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] I never stopped to count them.
Michael Anthony: You were too busy climbing, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Perhaps so, Mike. But I think in any man's life, the first step up, the first promotion, is the important one. But it's always more important if he has someone to share it with him.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Regina Wainwright Story (#4.14)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton den to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair, examining three miniature totem poles on his desk. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Tipton waves at the poles]
John Beresford Tipton: you know what these are, of course.
Michael Anthony: They're totem poles, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Quite right.
Michael Anthony: It's amazing, isn't it, sir, that so-called primitive people should have such pride of family that they'd create these monuments to their ancestors?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] It's not really amazing, Mike, when you consider that perhaps they had reasons to be proud.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: When you deliver this, you may see a rather startling example of just such pride in a so-called civilized person.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Professor Amberson Adams Story (#3.23)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a laboratory to witness Tipton, who is off-screen, holding two test tubes of liquids. Only Tipton's hands are visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, you see here two test tubes. Each one contains a separate element, in fluid state, of course. Their nature prevents them from mixing. Now watch.
[Tipton pours the liquid from one test tube into the other. The liquids do not blend and one sits atop the other liquid]
Michael Anthony: [Smiling] You might say that, because of their attitudes, they are mutually exclusive - incompatible.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] You might say that.
[Anthony is taken aback]
John Beresford Tipton: But at the moment, we are dealing with chemical elements. Now in this dropper
[indicating a third tube]
John Beresford Tipton: is a third element, completely unrelated to the other two. Let's see what happens.
[Tipton pours the third tube into the tube containing the other two liquids]
John Beresford Tipton: There.
[All three liquids mingle into one liquid]
John Beresford Tipton: In that dropper is a catalytic agent. It has the property of affecting and blending the other two elements.
[Tipton puts the tube into a rack]
John Beresford Tipton: There are people whose lives are just as dramatically changed by a catalytic agent.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's the name of our next millionaire, one of the incompatible elements - the human element.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, smiles, bows]


"The Millionaire: The Anna Hartley Story (#3.3)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters an outdoors garden facility and discovers Tipton at work with a bee-keeping operation. Tipton is off camera but viewers can see that his arms are covered with long sleeves and his hands are wearing heavy gloves]
[Uneasy]
Michael Anthony: You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] I don't blame you for being apprehensive, Mike.
[the lid of a hive containing bees is open a bit. Buzzing can be heard]
John Beresford Tipton: A bee sting is no trifle. But at the moment, the workers are busy feeding the queen bee.
[Closes the lid of the hive]
John Beresford Tipton: You know, of course, the queen bee shows her gratitude by stinging her slaves to death. Human beings are even more interesting than bees - especially queen bees.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: The Story of Lucky Swanson (#2.29)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton armory] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: I wanted you to see my new collection, Mike.
Michael Anthony: That's an interesting scarab, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: It was carved in Egypt 2500 years ago by some misguided fool who thought it would bring him good luck.
Michael Anthony: I suppose every civilization in history has had it's good luck charm.
John Beresford Tipton: There's no such thing as luck, Mike. We make our own.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: So, another million dollars I want you to give away. This young man has already been extraordinarily lucky - if you believe in that sort of thing.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony smiles]


"The Millionaire: The Hub Grimes Story (#3.33)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters Tipton's private projection room. Tipton is seated in a high backed chair with only his right arm visible to the viewers. Tipton is smoking a cigar. The projection room is darkened with only the flickering lights from the projector illuminating the room] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I want you to see a great football player in action.
[Tipton and Anthony view a player scoring a touchdown]
Michael Anthony: He is great, sir. Only one man can make a run like that - Hub Grimes. Great in everything he does. Nothing can stop that man.
John Beresford Tipton: I wonder.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here, give this to our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Dan Mulcahy Story (#1.4)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton laboratory, where he discovers Tipton, wearing a lab coat, working with chemicals, a flame, and test tubes. Tipton is off-camera with only his hands visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, Mike. Watch this.
[Tipton pores the contents of one test tube into another]
John Beresford Tipton: I'm speeding up a chemical reaction by adding what is called a catalyst. A catalyst is an exciter, Mike.
Michael Anthony: I beg your pardon?
John Beresford Tipton: An exciter. Substances change, fuse, and explode from the molecules that form them, excited by a catalyst.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: That's the experiments I'm making with these gifts, putting human lives under a microscope, adding the catalyst of a million dollars and watching them react.
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here - let's see what happens with this experiment. Our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: The David Barrett Story (#5.5)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton estate art gallery, where he finds Tipton admiring a painting. Tipton is hidden from the viewers by a pillar] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Indicating the painting] Look at her, Mike. Isn't she lovely?
[Tipton identifies the painting]
John Beresford Tipton: "The Sleeping Beauty." Probably the most romantic legend of all.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony steps closer to examine the painting] Ah, yes, a lovely girl awakened by a kiss.
John Beresford Tipton: A kiss from the right man.
Michael Anthony: Yes, of course. Naturally.
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, what if she hadn't awakened?
Michael Anthony: I don't think I'd like the story quite as well.
John Beresford Tipton: No, I suppose not. Let's let her sleep, Mike.
[Anthony turns off the light illuminating the painting. Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here. Our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Jonathan Bookman Story (#4.18)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the trophy room, which exhibits numerous stuffed animals and mounted heads of big game creatures. Tipton is seated in a high backed chair at his desk with only his right hand visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Tipton reaches onto his desk and displays a doll-like object]
John Beresford Tipton: have you ever seen a murder weapon like this?
Michael Anthony: It's a voodoo charm, isn't it, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, from Haiti. The natives there, if they want to harm someone, create a doll in the person's image and pierce it with pins or sharp knives, making the person sicken and die. A jealous woman is reported to have killed another woman with this weapon. But I wonder if the jealousy wasn't just as sharp and painful as these knives.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike. I'll want a full report.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony accepts the envelope and bows] Yes, sir.


"The Millionaire: The Iris Millar Story (#2.4)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Entering study to discover T playing Solitaire] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Ever play Solitaire, Mike?
Michael Anthony: I must confess I've never indulged, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: In Solitaire, you play against yourself. There's nothing to stop you from cheating yourself, if you wish.
Michael Anthony: I'm beginning to get your point, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: One has to be honest with oneself, Mike,
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: If he isn't, he courts disaster - in life as well as in cards.
[Giving envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's the name of our new millionaire, Mike. Let's see if she can be honest with herself.
[Anthony accepts envelope, bows, departs]


"The Millionaire: The Fred Morgan Story (#5.3)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton estate mansion, where he finds Tipton fiddling with a bow string. Tipton is just off screen so only his right arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
[Tipton is pulling on the bow string]
Michael Anthony: You'll break it, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Pick up the scissors, Mike. I'm testing the strength of this bow.
[Anthony picks up the scissors]
John Beresford Tipton: Now cut the string.
[Anthony snips the bow string. The release of pressure causes the bow to make a loud noise as it flies away]
John Beresford Tipton: Release from intolerable tension can sometimes be more dangerous than the tension itself.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Waldo Francis Turner Story (#3.10)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Viewers see Anthony descend some stairs and enter Tipton's game room, with several pinball machines evident. Tipton is off-camera with only his right arm visible. He is playing on a pinball machine] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Watch this shot, Mike.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: I'm going to get the ball
[Pointing]
John Beresford Tipton: right there.
[Tipton pulls the lever and the ball caroms and weaves though the pinball field. Tipton groans but winds up with 600,000 points]
John Beresford Tipton: Missed! Mike, the ball almost seemed to have a mind of its own. Someday, I'll write a monograph on the willfulness of inanimate objects. Meantime, I have a hunch there's some willfulness in animate objects, too.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: let's see how our new millionaire copes with it.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and turns to leave. Tipton returns to play]


"The Millionaire: The Hap Connolly Story (#4.8)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to find Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, smoking a cigarette. The room contains a world globe and a map of the United States. On Tipton's desk is an electrical device with buttons. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I've been thinking about this fair land of ours. The people who wander across, the people who never stay in one place - the wanderers, the footloose. Today, they may be in Seattle
[Tipton pushes a button and a light appears on the U.S. map at Seattle]
John Beresford Tipton: . Next week, they may very well be in New Orleans
[Tipton pushes another button and a light appears on the map at New Orleans]
John Beresford Tipton: . Or Buffalo or New York or any place their fancy dictates.
[Chuckles]
Michael Anthony: You mean the Knights of the Road, sir? The hoboes?
John Beresford Tipton: No, Mike, I don't think hoboes. I mean the men who just like to get around. They work for a living. They eat well and they sleep well. But they don't stay long in one place.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: You'll find the kind of man I mean when you deliver that.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Julia Conrad Story (#5.19)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a large living room to discover Tipton, seated in a high backed chair, playing Solitaire on a card table before him. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, when you play Solitaire, do you ever manipulate the cards? You know, arrange them so the game will turn out better?
Michael Anthony: You mean cheat, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Well, if you want to put it that way.
Michael Anthony: [Stuffily] Certainly not.
John Beresford Tipton: My grandmother used to cheat. She did it quite charmingly. She felt that Fate had really meant to deal her a better hand and she was merely assisting Fate.
[Anthony smiles. Tipton hands Anthony an envelope]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, and, before he turns to leave, arranges two rows of Solitaire cards for Tipton, then departs]


"The Millionaire: The Frank Harrigan Story (#5.13)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony descends the stairs into a work room in the estate basement, where he discovers Tipton , seated in a high back wooden chair adjacent to a work table with various objects upon it. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[holding up an old fashioned lantern]
John Beresford Tipton: who am I?
Michael Anthony: [Skeptical] Why, you're Mr. John Beresford Tipton.
John Beresford Tipton: No, no, I mean what character do I represent standing like this?
Michael Anthony: Well, holding the lantern like that, you must be Diogenes, looking for an honest man.
John Beresford Tipton: Quite a cynic, wasn't he?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir. He went to all of that trouble just to show his contempt for his fellow man. But cynics have a habit of underestimating the human race.
John Beresford Tipton: [Lowering the lantern back to the work bench] That's right. The modern counterpart of Diogenes would probably say that everyone has an angle.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, and starts to depart]


"The Millionaire: The Story of Sally Delaney (#2.35)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study. Tipton is seated in a high backed chair perusing a women's magazine]
[In a quizzical tone]
Michael Anthony: You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, you seem a little puzzled at my choice of reading material this evening.
[Tipton chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: Women's fashion.
Michael Anthony: I understand it's a very big business, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Bigger and more savage than you realize, with dog-eat-dog and jungle infighting. Those stocks and bonds are cozier than a corner drugstore.
[Tipton reads from the magazine]
John Beresford Tipton: "Maddelana - High Style's Head Priestess." Very silken-looking, isn't she, Mike?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony smiles]
John Beresford Tipton: I wouldn't want to tangle in business with her.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I want you to deliver a million dollars.
Michael Anthony: To Maddelana?
John Beresford Tipton: No, Mike - to her ghost.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Mildred Kester Story (#3.15)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Viewers see Anthony enter the greenhouse, where he finds Tipton pruning a plant. Tipton is off-camera with only his right arm visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [as he continues pruning, Tipton quotes from act 2, scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet] "Within the infant rind of this small flower, poison has residence and medicine power."
Michael Anthony: Shakespeare, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: He always saw into the heart of the matter, didn't he, Mike?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Indicating the flower to Anthony] This is Atropa Belladonna, more commonly known as the Deadly Nightshade. Properly used, this blossom has curative benefits. Improperly used - poisonous.
Michael Anthony: Isn't that true of most things, sir? Almost everything has either the power of good or evil.
John Beresford Tipton: Exactly, Mike.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Suppose we see how the power is used in the case of our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, gives a final glance at the flower, and turns to leave]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Peter Longman (#6.34)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, with only his right arm visible to viewers. On the desk before Tipton is an assortment of various sized keys] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, have you any idea how the history of the human race you can tell by keys?
Michael Anthony: [Bemused] I hadn't thought, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Oh, it's fascinating. What was so valuable that it had to be locked up? And who was important enough to have the key? Ah, yes, the key, that which unlocks the mystery, the treasure, the heart.
Michael Anthony: Well, if you think of it that way...
John Beresford Tipton: Exactly. It was the important man who had the key, the key to the situation.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, and turns to leave]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Dr. Alan March (#3.29)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Michael Anthony enters the science room on the Tipton estate where he observes John Beresford Tipton, sitting in a high backed chair, before a topographical survey display. Only his right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, what product do you think of when Pennsylvania is mentioned?
Michael Anthony: Well, sir, coal, I guess.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Right.
[Tipton hands an envelope over to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Now this is our next millionaire. He lives in a little coal town not far from Scranton.
Michael Anthony: [Studying the name on the envelope] But what does Dr. Alan March have to do with coal?
John Beresford Tipton: Dr. March's people were coal miners. But right now, he seems to be having trouble deciding his place in the world. Perhaps that check will help him make up his mind.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.


"The Millionaire: The Charles Wyatt Story (#3.21)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a Silverstone estate room that has the atmosphere of a theater. He sees Tipton seated in a high backed chair at a table, holding the renowned Comedy/Tragedy mask. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, did you ever read about mad King Ludwig of Bavaria?
Michael Anthony: Yes, I have, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: He built an entire theater for his own enjoyment. A luxuriously equipped stage, a beautiful auditorium, and only one seat in it: his throne-like chair.
Michael Anthony: [Smiling] He must have been mad.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Maybe I am, too.
[Anthony looks puzzled]
John Beresford Tipton: I know I enjoy a performance I alone have set in motion.
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's my ticket of admission.
Michael Anthony: You're giving away another million, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Subject to the usual conditions. Watch him closely, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Martha Halloran (#5.36)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony descends several steps to enter the music room, where he observes Tipton, seated in a high backed chair, singing and strumming a mandolin. Tipton is singing very off-key and only his hands are visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, Mike, I knew you were a music lover.
Michael Anthony: And still for sent for me?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Mike, when I was struggling to make my first fortune, I worked a mine in Mexico. A girl there taught me how to play this fat little mandolin.
Michael Anthony: She taught you?
John Beresford Tipton: Well, at least the lessons were delightful.
[Tipton chuckles and hands the mandolin to Anthony]
Michael Anthony: [Inspecting the instrument] I haven't seen one of these since I sang baritone in my high school Glee and Mandolin Club.
[Returns to instrument to the desk]
John Beresford Tipton: You may be seeing others very soon.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, turns and ascends the stairs to the exit while Tipton plays and sings, again off-key]


"The Millionaire: The Story of Tom Mead (#2.28)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Enters the Tipton library] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, in this case, I have some of the world's prized editions. But this document I prize most of all. It's one on the few reproductions of England's Magna Carta.
Michael Anthony: I believe the Magna Carta is the foundation on which our system of bail is based.
John Beresford Tipton: Exactly, Mike. And the interesting thing is that, while bail is a protection for the innocent, it also frequently protects the guilty as well.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's a man who knows quite a bit about the effects of bail. He's our next millionaire.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Matt Kirby Story (#4.1)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a Tipton estate annals containing hundreds of front pages of newspapers. As he approaches Tipton, Anthony pauses to glance at headlines such as "Roosevelt Landslide" and "Lusitania Sunk." Tipton is seated in a high backed chair with only his right arm visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Pointing at a newspaper]
John Beresford Tipton: do you remember that headline?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony peruses a Chicago Globe newspaper Extra with the headline "Hughes Elected US President!"] Yes, sir, that was a very famous headline.
John Beresford Tipton: That is was, Mike. Charles Evans Hughes ran against Woodrow Wilson, and for a few hours, it looked like he'd won. In Chicago, this Extra hit the streets and had to be pulled back.
Michael Anthony: Like the false Armistice headline in World War I?
John Beresford Tipton: Right, Mike. And it was about this time that a pernicious disease called 'Yellow Journalism' began to spread. It still flourishes in some places.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see what kind of headline this will get us.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Russ White Story (#4.35)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton library to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, admiring a crystal vase] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Indicating the vase] What do you think of it, Mike?
Michael Anthony: That's very beautiful, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, beautiful. But it's exasperating.
Michael Anthony: What?
John Beresford Tipton: No card, no name. There's nobody to thank for it.
Michael Anthony: [With a wry grin] If you'll excuse me, sir, that's how some of your beneficiaries feel when I tell them the donor must remain anonymous.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] But at least they can thank you, Mike. I didn't even get to thank the delivery boy.
[Indicating the crystal vase]
John Beresford Tipton: Now, if this were only a crystal ball, I'd be able to find out who gave it to me.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Captain Jonathan Carroll Story (#2.34)" (1956)
John Beresford Tipton: [Anthony enters the Tipton Estate's private shooting range where Tipton is practicing skeet shooting. Only his left arm is visible to viewers] Mark!
[Tipton fires rifle and strikes the skeet]
Michael Anthony: [Observing as he arrives] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, Mike. You know, there are a great many moments in a man's life that demand good nerves and a steady hand.
[Tipton loads his rifle with ammunition as he prepares for the next round]
John Beresford Tipton: Some of the occasions are vital while others may be as trivial as the demonstration you just saw.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Our new millionaire is an unsung soldier, whose life has often depended on his courage and his steadiness of hand under the most dangerous of circumstances.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Find him, Mike, and give his this.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Tom Hampton (#6.9)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to discover Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, reading a book. Only Tipton's left hand is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, can you keep a secret?
Michael Anthony: Well, I think I can, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: An important secret?
Michael Anthony: [Becoming taken aback as if he is being chastised] I don't think I've ever revealed anything you didn't want known - have I, Mr. Tipton?
John Beresford Tipton: No, Mike.
[Tipton is toying with Anthony, who doesn't realize it]
Michael Anthony: I hope by now you can trust my sense of responsibility.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] I do, Mike. But I wasn't thinking of telling for any secrets. I just asked if you had secrets of your own.
Michael Anthony: [Calming down] I imagine almost everyone has a few things they preferred to keep to themselves.
John Beresford Tipton: Of course. I'm not trying to pry. If you weren't good at keeping secrets
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I wouldn't trust this to you.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, smiles, bows, and turns to depart]


"The Millionaire: The Charles Hartford Simpson Story (#3.4)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair reading a book, with only his right hand, holding the book, visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Presenting the book]
John Beresford Tipton: I've just acquired this first edition of "Walden" by Henry David Thoreau. Ever read it?
Michael Anthony: As I matter of fact, I have. I'm a great admirer of Thoreau.
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, he once said that money is never required to purchase any necessity of the soul. I believe that. But I wonder how many people do.
Michael Anthony: Quite a few, I imagine, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I'm curious, Mike.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Suppose we find out from our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Whitney Ames (#6.18)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton electrical shop] You sent for me, sir?
[Tipton turns off grinding machine]
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, have you ever had your nose to the grindstone?
Michael Anthony: When I was younger, sir.
[Anthony gives a sly grin]
Michael Anthony: Lately I haven't been working quite that hard.
John Beresford Tipton: Before I retired, I was usually in that position. And some men, Mike, live all their lives with their noses to the grindstone.
Michael Anthony: Sounds most uncomfortable.
[Anthony taps his nose]
Michael Anthony: Must change the shape considerably.
[Anthony laughs but gets no response from Tipton]
Michael Anthony: I guess that wasn't a very good joke.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] No, it wasn't. And sometimes it changes the shape of their lives when they're able, for one reason or another, to get away from the grindstone.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Nick Cannon Story (#3.17)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters an outdoor nursery to see an off-camera Tipton working on a plant. Only Tipton's right hand is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I have a young man I want you to see. He has the same problems as this plant.
Michael Anthony: What seems to be the trouble?
John Beresford Tipton: Both of them come from foreign countries and neither one seems to be transplanting successfully.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I wonder what a million dollars will do for a young man whose only aim in life is to have a good time.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Valerie Hunt (#3.13)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Viewers see Anthony entering the library to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk with a blackboard beside him. Only Tipton's right hand, holding a pointer, is visible] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[pointing the blackboard]
John Beresford Tipton: you will observe an equilateral triangle. Take the chalk and draw a horizontal line across its apex.
[Anthony does so]
John Beresford Tipton: Do you notice the similarity between the triangle and the Scales of Justice?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir, I do.
John Beresford Tipton: Well, there's something besides Justice involved in the problem of our next millionaire.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see what a million dollars will do to tip the scales one way or another.
Michael Anthony: [Examining the envelope with furrowed brow] Two women, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: No, Mike: one woman, two names. I'll be interested to know which one gets it.


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Neal Bowers (#4.25)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton library] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Handing newspaper to Anthony] Mike, I suppose you recognize this publication?
Michael Anthony: [Reviewing newspaper] Yes, indeed, sir.
[Wincing, uncomfortably]
Michael Anthony: That is, I have seen racing forms on street corners and in barbershops.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckling] But not in my library, eh? As a matter of fact, I have been studying the problem of handicaps. Figuratively speaking, a handicap is defined as any disadvantage that renders success more difficult. But a handicap may also be an advantage.
Michael Anthony: You mean, sir, if you take long odds and your horse comes in a winner?
John Beresford Tipton: Oh, you do know something about the subject.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: No, I was thinking about handicaps in other fields - such as love. Mike, how would you like to take a trip to a city fabled for its romances? Paris!
[Giving envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here you are, Mike - our next millionaire.


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Ann Griffin (#5.30)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony descends a staircase into a gallery/showroom of sorts where he discovers Tipton seated in a high back chair at a desk with only his right arm visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton turns a switch on his desk, plunging the room into darkness except for a spotlight shining on Anthony. Tipton chuckles] Know what you are, Mike?
Michael Anthony: What, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: You're a great motion picture star.
Michael Anthony: I am?
John Beresford Tipton: The spotlight is on you. You're the glamour boy. The girls scream when they see you. They want your autograph. There are stories about you in all the fan magazines.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
[Anthony winces as he looks up at the spotlight above]
Michael Anthony: But the light is blinding me, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: The glare of the spotlight makes it sometimes hard to see just where you're going.
[Tipton turns the desk switch and normal lighting returns]
John Beresford Tipton: There. It's all over, Mike.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Here.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Emily Baker (#5.20)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, viewing the small statute of a female on his desk] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, did you ever dream of meeting the perfect woman? A girl with everything, at least as far as you're concerned? Tailor-made to your specifications?
Michael Anthony: Well, yes, sir. What man hasn't?
John Beresford Tipton: Probably none. But I wonder how often the man finds his dream girl and how he would react, if he finds her.
[Tipton opens a desk drawer and removes an envelope, which he hands over to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
Michael Anthony: To help finance the search, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Not exactly. But it is an interesting thought.
[Anthony bows and turns to leave]


"The Millionaire: The Fred Graham Story (#3.5)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters Tipton's darkened study to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair watching the World Series on TV] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Indicating TV] Watch that one, Mike.
Michael Anthony: I've been keeping the box score, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton shushes Anthony]
TV Sportscaster: Well, this may be the last pitch of the game. With two Giants out, the count is 3-2. He winds up, delivers - a fast curve ball is a high popup going foul.
[a fielder catches the popup]
TV Sportscaster: The ball game is over. The New York Yankees triumph over the Giants by a score of...
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton uses a remote control to turn off the TV and turn on the study lights] That makes thirty cents I've lost to you on the Series, Mike.
[Tipton hands over a dime to Anthony]
Michael Anthony: Thank you, sir. Shall I file this box score, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Burns the darn thing up.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: You know, Mike, you've been keeping the box score on our millionaires. Let's see how many hits, runs, and errors occur when this man has his innings
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: with one million dollars.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Andrew C. Cooley (#6.12)" (1959)
John Beresford Tipton: [Anthony enters the Tipton study to overhear Tipton speaking as he sits in his high backed chair at his desk] ... a long time for me. I wonder if that may change.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony looks around the study to learn that no one else is present] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, Mike. Well, come in, come in.
Michael Anthony: I thought I heard someone talking, sir.
[Anthony smiles]
John Beresford Tipton: You did. I was talking to this room. I do it quite often. You think that's strange?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony is uncomfortable] Well, sir, I wouldn't advise you to do it in the presence of others. They may not understand.
Michael Anthony: I suppose you're right. Most of them wouldn't. But children and very old people and those who are alone a lot - they'd understand.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
Michael Anthony: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Ken Leighton Story (#5.4)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton library to find Tipton standing with a book, partially obstructed from viewers by a bookcase. Only Tipton's right hand is visible] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: I've been taking a little journey, Mike, back to the days of my childhood.
Michael Anthony: That's always pleasant, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Join me,
[Tipton hands over his book to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: although it's a somewhat shorter trip for you.
Michael Anthony: "Horatio Alger", sir?
John Beresford Tipton: The American dream, Mike. The young man who goes from rags to riches. You remember how this pleasant transition was achieved, Mike?
Michael Anthony: As I recall, sir, the formula was always hard work and perseverance.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, but there are always a few who prefer shortcuts and like to chase rainbows.
[Tipton reaches into his pocket and produces an envelope, which he hands over to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Give this to a rainbow chaser par excellence, Mike. Our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Bob Fielding Story (#3.39)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the workshop where he observes Tipton turning a screw on an ancient wooden device. Tipton is off-camera with only his hands visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: do you know what this is?
Michael Anthony: It's an old-fashioned pillory, isn't it, sir? The kind they used in colonial times.
John Beresford Tipton: You know that as late as 1905, people were being confined in this in parts of the United States.
Michael Anthony: I believe Delaware was the last to abolish it.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes. All of us are confined, Mike, in one way or another. By fact or by circumstance, some of us are confined by too little money; some of us by too much.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Margaret Browning Story (#1.6)" (1955)
John Beresford Tipton: [Anthony enters the terrace off the south wing of the Silverstone estate where he observes Tipton, seated in a high backed outdoor chair, lightly holding and petting a small bird. Only Tipton's hands are visible to the viewers] There.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: There, there now.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony sits in a chair beside Tipton] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, during my walk this morning, I found this little bird. It's mother, evidentially, pushed it from the nest to teach it to fly, you know?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Continuing to pet the bird] Oh, a couple of days more of feeding, I'll put it out and it's fly.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: You know, Mike, a lot of human beings need more confidence than this little bird to fly. Let's see if a million dollars will give wings to this girl.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.


"The Millionaire: The Betty Hawley Story (#5.1)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a large living room to discover Tipton standing before a roaring fireplace. His back is to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I've been seeing all sorts of interesting things
[Points to fireplace]
John Beresford Tipton: in the flames.
Michael Anthony: I know. It's fascinating - almost hypnotic.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Whatever you call it, when you get along to my age, you begin to think about hot places.
Michael Anthony: [Wide grin] Oh, now, really, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: But there are some people who, for one reason or another, seek out hot places. Sometimes they find it difficult to get out.
[Tipton retrieves an envelope from his pocket and hands it over to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Deliver this to our next millionaire, Mike. It'll take you out of the country. You'd better wear something cool.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Jerry Mitchell (#6.21)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, ever have a town named after you?
Michael Anthony: I've never deserved that honor, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Well, I don't know that I've deserved it either. But this little town, high in the Rockies, has rechristened itself "Tipton."
Michael Anthony: Quite a distinction, sir, to have a whole town named after you.
John Beresford Tipton: Indeed it is, Mike. Difficult to live up to an honor like that. Some men have found it impossible.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Betty Perkins Story (#3.16)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a laboratory to discover Tipton, uniformed and with heavy gloves, working with a glass tube and a gas burner. Tipton is blowing a bubble into the middle of the tube. Only Tipton's hands are visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton turns off the burner] Mike,
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: did you ever try this glass-blowing?
Michael Anthony: No, sir, I haven't.
John Beresford Tipton: Oh, it's interesting. You start with just a plain glass tube. If you have the right tools to work with, like a gas burner and carbon pencil, you can change the tube into anything you want it to be.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony] Here's our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]
John Beresford Tipton: Give her the tools she needs to change herself and see what she decides to be.
[Anthony bows and turns to leave]


"The Millionaire: The Arthur Darner Story (#2.21)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a hothouse/nursery, where he observes Tipton aerating a lily plant. Tipton is off screen with only his hands visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, most people are accustomed to the ordinary, normal pattern of their lives. They think they want to get out of that pattern but, if given the opportunity, they get panic stricken.
[Tipton indicates the lily plant he has been cultivating]
John Beresford Tipton: Lovely, aren't they?
Michael Anthony: [Smiling] They'll make a beautiful floral piece for Easter.
John Beresford Tipton: The symbol of resurrection. Let's see if this will bring about a resurrection
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: for our next millionaire.


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Mitchell Gunther (#6.11)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, constructing a matchstick tower] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, ever build houses like this? Or castles in the sand?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir, of course - when I was a child.
John Beresford Tipton: Some people go on doing it, even when they've grown up.
[Tipton adds another matchstick to the structure]
Michael Anthony: I don't suppose you mean that literally, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: No, but they built on shifting values, unstable personalities, sometimes on false friends. Then, because the foundation isn't strong enough
[Tipton adds another matchstick to the tower, which falls over. Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Uncle Robby Story (#1.19)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the library so discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair, wearing a smoking jacket with a cane in his lap. Only Tipton's hands are visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Look at them, Mike.
[Points his cane at a bookshelf]
John Beresford Tipton: Shakespeare, Milton, Plato, - the poets and philosophers whose wit and wisdom enrich our lives. If we would only listen to them. Why does man have to learn the hard way?
Michael Anthony: I don't know, Mr. Tipton.
John Beresford Tipton: It's wasteful! Wasteful, Mike.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: That's what I've been accused of myself when I give away a million dollars.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's the man for it this time.


"The Millionaire: The Charles Lamar Story (#1.10)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a hunting lodge on the Silverstone estate where he observes Tipton working on a wood model display of a community that he is building. Tipton is off-camera with only his hands visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[indicating the model]
John Beresford Tipton: what do you think I should pave the streets of this town with?
Michael Anthony: Asphalt, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: You know, Mike, some people come to this country and expect to find the streets paved with gold.
Michael Anthony: You mean immigrants?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes. And once they set foot on the shore, they realize that it's a slight exaggeration.
Michael Anthony: No doubt, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: However, I've decided that one immigrant shall find the story true, at least for him.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's the name of our next millionaire.


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Larry Maxwell (#6.23)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, with only his right arm visible to viewers. Tipton is playing with a baseball and baseball glove. Several sports trophies can be seen around the room] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Well, it's about that time of year again, Mike. Did you ever play baseball?
Michael Anthony: [Smiles] Not since I was a young boy, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Continues playing with the baseball and glove] People always think of baseball strictly in terms of it's being a game with players who become national heroes. There's more to it than "Mighty Casey has struck out."
Michael Anthony: You're referring, of course, to the executive end of the game now.
John Beresford Tipton: That's right, Mike. With players on the field, executives in the offices, never the twain shall meet.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Or shall they?
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, and turns to leave]


"The Millionaire: The Louise Williams Story (#2.32)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, building a house of playing cards. Only Tipton's hands are visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, did you ever build a card house?
Michael Anthony: [Slightly smiling] I haven't for some time, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Men's lives are built like this.
[Tipton's hands are seen placing cards atop a bottom base of cards]
John Beresford Tipton: First, a foundation of habit and training, growing precariously upward
[Tipton places some more cards on the house]
John Beresford Tipton: by layers of ambition and determination.
[Anthony grows a bit apprehensive as the house of cards grows higher. Tipton places the last card on top]
John Beresford Tipton: There it is.
[Tipton chuckles and Anthony smiles]
John Beresford Tipton: Only sometimes, winds blowing from an unexpected direction can change the entire shape of it.
[Tipton blows and the house of cards falls]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: what this windfall will do.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Watch her closely.
[Anthony places the envelope into his breast pocket and turns to depart]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Elizabeth Tander (#6.16)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair with two pair of women's shoes atop his desk] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I've been thinking about clothes. Or rather shoes in particular. They sometimes tell a story.
[Tipton displays a pair of shoes]
John Beresford Tipton: What do these tell you, Mike?
Michael Anthony: Well, they look comfortable.
John Beresford Tipton: I mean about their wearer?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony through furrowed brow] I imagine she'd be conservative and practical.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton displays the second pair of shoes] And these?
Michael Anthony: I'd guess she'd be what we refer to as a glamor girl.
John Beresford Tipton: Wouldn't it be interesting if both pair belonged to the same girl?
Michael Anthony: I suppose it would, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony] Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Johanna Judson Story (#4.23)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk with various artifacts from the Middle Ages around the room. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[pointing at an object]
John Beresford Tipton: do you know what that is?
Michael Anthony: [Examines the object] Yes, sir. It's an Iron Maiden, a Medieval instrument of torture.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, it is. A horrible thing. Thank heavens it isn't in use today. Yet there is something else which is always with us that's perhaps the greatest torture of all. It's loneliness. Simple loneliness. That can be a torture that even a million dollars can't always cure.
[Tipton gives an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's find out, shall we, what it does for our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Victor Volante Story (#2.22)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to discover Tipton, seated in a high back chair at his desk, fiddling with a miniature circus wagon. Calliope music is heard and only Tipton's hands are visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Circus music. A calliope, named for one of the muses. Know which one, Mike?
Michael Anthony: The muse of epic poetry.
John Beresford Tipton: And that's fitting - there is plenty of epic poetry at a circus: love, laughter, sudden death.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's the name of our next millionaire, Mike. You'll find him under the big top.


"The Millionaire: The Jerry Patterson Story (#3.26)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Pointing to a scale atop his desk]
John Beresford Tipton: do you know what this is?
Michael Anthony: It's a scale, sir - a balance.
John Beresford Tipton: The elements that go to make up a friendship - a really close friendship - are mysterious. The scales must be properly, one might say, delicately balanced.
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see what a million dollars will do to the balance of just such a friendship.
[Anthony accepts envelope]


"The Millionaire: The Norman Conover Story (#5.2)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony descends some stairs into a Tipton estate laboratory. Tipton is just off camera and only his right arm is visible] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Have you ever seen a device like this, Mike?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony observes a candle burning in a dish, surrounded by a black powder] A candle, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: A candle burning toward an exploding powder.
[Anthony becomes immediately concerned]
John Beresford Tipton: I understand it was once very popular as a torture device.
Michael Anthony: I don't believe I ever...
John Beresford Tipton: There are people whose lives are lived this way. It can cause great tension, wouldn't you say?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony watches the burning candle growing closer to the powder] I would, sir. Yes, I would.
John Beresford Tipton: Perhaps it's something in the past they fear, or something never quite fully accepted or faced up to.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony observes the burning candle approaching the powder] Sir!
John Beresford Tipton: Oh, are you worried, Mike? Don't be. It's only charcoal.
[Anthony is visibly relieved. Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here, Mike, our next millionaire.
[Anthony manages a weak smile as he accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Martin Scott (#5.6)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Silverstone estate outdoor garden, where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed al fresco chair observing a bust of a young boy. It appears to be evening] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, do you remember the legend of William Tell?
Michael Anthony: Everyone remembers the Swiss tyrant Gessler who commanded William Tell to shoot an apple off his son's head with a bow and arrow.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton places an apple atop the head of the boy's statue] Yes, Mike - only it was an Austrian tyrant who held the Swiss patriot William Tell as a prisoner.
Michael Anthony: [Embarrassed] Yes, sir, that's what I meant.
John Beresford Tipton: If Tell succeeded, he'd gain his freedom. If he failed...
Michael Anthony: He would kill his son.
John Beresford Tipton: But he shot it off, clean as a whistle, destroyed the tyrant, and set his people free. What I remember most is the supreme confidence that boy had in his father.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.


"The Millionaire: The Crystal Sands Story (#3.30)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk reading a book. Only Tipton's left hand, holding the book, is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I've just been reading a book about famous adventurers.
[Lays the book down on the desk]
Michael Anthony: Sounds interesting, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, they are interesting. They are all driven by an insatiable curiosity. They also have another thing in common. They're all attractive to women. Why do you think women feel that way about them, Mike?
Michael Anthony: [Smiling] I'm afraid I'm in no position to answer that question, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Don't underestimate yourself, Mike.
[Tipton chuckles and hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Well, perhaps our next millionaire might answer the question for us.
[Anthony accepts and envelope and smiles]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Dan Howell (#5.10)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton estate game room, where he discovers Tipton running several model trains. Tipton is just off screen so viewers can see only his right arm] You sent for me, sir?
[Tipton switches off the trains]
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, when you see a train, do you wave at the engineer?
Michael Anthony: I used to, when I was a child, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] I still do. Maybe I'm in my second childhood. Go ahead, Mike, try it. You've got a switch there.
[Anthony engages a switch, turns on some trains and they go around a bit. Anthony smiles and is obviously enjoying himself]
John Beresford Tipton: I'm glad you like trains, too, Mike.
[the trains stop. Tipton reaches into his pocket and pulls out an envelope, which he places in one of the train's cars]
John Beresford Tipton: Because you're going to deliver this one on a train.
[Tipton turns on the train, which delivers the envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: The Rita Keeley Story (#2.1)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to find Tipton sitting in a high backed chair scrutinizing a miniature dollhouse-sized theater stage. Only his hands are visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, in what form of show business would a performer pray for rain?
Michael Anthony: [Stumbling] Well, I - I...
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Give up? Burlesque, Mike. Nothing will fill up a burlesque theater faster than a heavy rain.
Michael Anthony: [Trying to make a point without looking at Tipton] I know very little about burlesque, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Well, you're going to meet a burlesque star. You're going to give a million dollars to Dinah Might.
Michael Anthony: [Furrowing brow] I don't understand, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckling and spelling] D - I - N - A - H - Dinah.
[Continues spelling]
John Beresford Tipton: M - I- G -H - T - Might. Dinah Might!


"The Millionaire: The Ralph McKnight Story (#2.5)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, holding a magnifying glass and examining a large coin collection. Only Tipton's hands are visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Numismatics.
Michael Anthony: I beg your pardon, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Rare coins. Fascinating hobby.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton continues to examine his collection] It must be one of man's primeval instincts, Mike - to collect things. Coins, stamps, miniatures. Why, some people even collect grudges.
Michael Anthony: Grudges, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Grievances against their fellow man.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see if we can devalue the value of this young man's grudge with a million dollars.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: The Candy Caldwell Story (#2.23)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study where he finds Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, reviewing a photo album of women's faces. Only Tipton's left hand is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Ever realize there are fashions in faces, Mike?
Michael Anthony: Faces?
John Beresford Tipton: I don't mean that women of any period looked alike. But in each fashion cycle, there are fashion faces - an ideal. Here, take a look, Mike.
[Tipton displays a picture of a Roman-era female]
John Beresford Tipton: A Roman pin-up.
[Tipton turns the page to exhibit a late 1800s woman]
John Beresford Tipton: Then there's the Gibson girl, who captured the last century.
[Tipton turns the page and reveals the face of soon-to-be- millionaire Candy Crowley, played by actress Peggie Castle]
John Beresford Tipton: And here she is, Mike - today's face.
Michael Anthony: Lovely girl. Lovely.
John Beresford Tipton: You're going to meet her, Mike.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: She's our new millionaire.


"The Millionaire: The Newman Johnson Story (#5.11)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, tell me. What do you think of me as an employer?
Michael Anthony: [Surprised] Why, I've always admired you greatly, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: But don't you sometimes have the desire to turn the tables, Mike? To sit in my chair?
Michael Anthony: [Taken aback] Why, Mr. Tipton...
John Beresford Tipton: To tell me off?
[Anthony is obviously uncomfortable]
John Beresford Tipton: Come, come, Mike. Confess it.
Michael Anthony: Well, I can't say that it has never occurred to me.
John Beresford Tipton: Try it, Mike.
Michael Anthony: [Painfully] Mr. Tipton, I'd rather not. I don't think I could.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton chuckles and hands over an envelope to Anthony] Our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Joe Iris Story (#1.3)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the veranda in the garden where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed outdoor chair with only his right arm visible to the viewers. To the right of his chair is a small glass table containing a bowl of fruit] Yes, Mr. Tipton?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Picking a banana out of the fruit bowl]
John Beresford Tipton: why do people peel bananas?
Michael Anthony: Well, that's fairly simple. We all know what's inside but we can't get at it until we remove the peel.
John Beresford Tipton: Exactly, Mike.
[Returns the banana to the fruit bowl]
John Beresford Tipton: And that's why I like to peel people - to remove the outer peel and get down to the most important thing: what's inside that peel.
Michael Anthony: I don't quite understand what you're getting at, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I've selected another person to whom I'm going to give one million dollars.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I'm anxious to see what this man does with it and how he emerges from his peel.
Michael Anthony: I'm beginning to understand.
John Beresford Tipton: Watch him carefully. Give me a complete, written report on this particular 'banana.'


"The Millionaire: The Larry Evans Story (#2.19)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the workshop to see Tipton working on the rigging of a model canoe. Tipton is off screen with only his hands visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Continues to pull the stringing] As you know, Mike, this is an outrigger, a device invented by the Malays many, many centuries past.
Michael Anthony: I believe it was developed to ensure balance and stability.
John Beresford Tipton: Exactly, Mike.
[Tipton continues his work]
John Beresford Tipton: But it was copied and improved through the years and today is still widely used throughout the islands in the South Seas.
[Tipton stops working]
John Beresford Tipton: That reminds me.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's our next millionaire, Mike. Let's see how the sudden acquisition of a fortune affects his balance and stability.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Harry Brown (#6.2)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton library to find Tipton seated in a high backed chair reading a book] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, did you ever read this book?
[Tipton holds up his book]
John Beresford Tipton: "How to be Happy Though Married."
Michael Anthony: No, sir. Mr. Tipton, don't you think that's a rather flippant title? Most marriages are happy, I believe.
John Beresford Tipton: Ah, then you think marriages are made in Heaven?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony gives a wry grin] You could put it that way, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Hmmm. Well, they may be made in Heaven, Mike, but many of them seem to be fought out on this worldly plane.
[Tipton chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: But then, only valuable things are worth fighting for.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Louise Benson Story (#5.35)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to observe Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk, on which a reel-to-reel tape recorder is located. Tipton is listening to sound effects and only his right hand is visible to viewers. As Anthony approaches his employer, he hears the sound of a fog horn blaring] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton switches off the recorder] Ever been in a fog, Mike?
Michael Anthony: I am at the moment, sir. I haven't the foggiest idea why you'd want to stereophonic tape recording of that.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] I'm adding it to my collection: 'Sounds of Danger.' Listen.
[Tipton switches the recorder back on. Tires are heard screeching, then gunshots, then a police whistle, and finally a woman's seductive voice saying, 'I love you, darling.' This causes Anthony to do a double take as Tipton turns off the recorder]
John Beresford Tipton: Sometimes, love is the most dangerous of them all.
Michael Anthony: I'll take your warning, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: You do that, Mike.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: And take this, too. Our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts and envelope, bows, and turns to leave]


"The Millionaire: The Story of Steve Logan (#4.10)" (1957)
John Beresford Tipton: [Anthony enters the Tipton estate hobby room, to find Tipton operating a set of electric trains. Tipton switches off the trains] Hello, Mike.
Michael Anthony: You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, did you ever play with trains when you were a boy?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir, I certainly did.
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] I still do. But nowadays it's not so much the railroads that fascinate me as the men who build them - and the men who build the great bridges and dams and roads that tread their way across the land.
Michael Anthony: It can be very dangerous work, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes. They face great physical problems, Mike, and emotional problems, too.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire is one of these men.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Rod Matthews Story (#4.15)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Entering the Armory of John Beresford Tipton] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Displaying a boomerang] Know what this it, Mike?
Michael Anthony: It's a boomerang, isn't it, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, it's a boomerang - one of the oldest and most ingenious weapons ever designed by man. If it missed the animal, the weapon curves around the returns to the hunter. And more than once, it has been known to strike down the man who hurled it. Let's see what kind of a hunter our next millionaire is.


"The Millionaire: The Pev Johnson Story (#1.12)" (1955)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a workshop where he finds Tipton working on a grindstone polishing gems. Tipton is off-camera with only his hands visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[displaying a jewel]
John Beresford Tipton: this was once a dull, course gem, just like
[displaying a second stone]
John Beresford Tipton: this. Naturally, this
[indicating the first gem]
John Beresford Tipton: is worth infinitely more than this
[indicating the second rock]
John Beresford Tipton: . Just like people, who sometimes need to be shaped and polished to bring out the best in them. However, as we know, this doesn't always work.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: I'm curious to find out what a million dollars will do to this person.


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Jane Carr (#3.2)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton library where he finds Tipton seated in a high backed chair perusing a newspaper] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I want you to help me prove that an old adage is completely wrong. They say nothing is as dead as yesterday's newspaper - even with a story like this.
[Tipton points to the newspaper headline about the death of a reporter]
Michael Anthony: Oh, yes, I read that. Shocking, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: It would take quite a bit to bring this story in yesterday's newspaper back to life.
[Tipton places an envelope atop the newspaper]
John Beresford Tipton: Perhaps as much as a million dollars.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: The Emily Short Story (#1.5)" (1955)
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton is seated on the terrace of the south wing of Silverstone. He is off-camera and is stroking a small bird in his hands, which is the only visible part of his body] There, there.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: There, there, now.
Michael Anthony: [Anthony arrives and sits next to Tipton, as he observes the bird] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, on my walk this morning, I found this little bird. It's mother evidently pushed it from the nest, thinking it could fly on its own, you know.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton, Michael Anthony: A couple of days more of feeding and I'll put it out and it'll fly.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: You know, Mike, a lot of human beings need more confidence than this little bird to fly. Let's see if a million dollars
[Tipton hands envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: will give wings to this girl.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Maggie Dalton (#6.35)" (1960)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, with only his left arm visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, you were born in a small town, weren't you?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Why did you move to the city?
Michael Anthony: When I was young, my family moved. My father's business took him to the city.
John Beresford Tipton: That's a good reason. With some, however, it's a dream. People born in small towns all over the country are drawn by thousands every year to the big city.
Michael Anthony: Yes, the big city certainly is exciting.
John Beresford Tipton: And it can also be the loneliest place in the world.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts the envelope, bows, and turns to depart]


"The Millionaire: The Larry Parker Story (#4.6)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton outdoor gardens, to find Tipton weeding some flowers. Tipton is just off camera] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, You know I never look at flowers blooming without somehow feeling that they're the same flowers that bloomed last year and the year before that and all the years before.
Michael Anthony: The same flowers, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckles] Memory, Mike. The quality in every human being which keeps our experiences from fading; which keeps all our memories alive.
[Hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Let's see what a million dollars will do for Larry Parker's memory of a love that won't fade away.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: The Pete Hopper Story (#5.14)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton estate trophy room to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair, fumbling with a box] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, look at this. It came today from China.
[Tipton hands over the box to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Isn't it beautiful?
Michael Anthony: Yes, very lovely. How does it open?
John Beresford Tipton: Oh, you just push that button in the middle there.
[Anthony pushes the button and a jack-in-the-box jumps out. Tipton chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: Frightened, Mike?
Michael Anthony: Startled, sir, but not frightened.
John Beresford Tipton: Suppose, Mike, you were that jack-in-the-box. How would you feel, locked up and confined in that small, dark container? You might be frightened then.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike. I'll want a full report.
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
[Anthony turns and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Andrew Sterling Story (#4.31)" (1958)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, where he discovers Tipton, seated in a high backed chair at his desk, from which he is tossing darts at a dartboard. Only Tipton's right arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton indicates the dartboard] How was that, Mike?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony glances at dartboard with three darts upon the target and smiles] Very neat, if I may say so, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Ah.
[Chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: I guess it wasn't bad for a man my age.
Michael Anthony: Why, I don't know anybody younger in spirit than you, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Thank you, Mike. I believe it was Cicero who once said, "I, for my part, would rather be a young man for a shorter length of time than be an old man before I was one."
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here, Mike - our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Phillip Burnell (#6.4)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton estate garden to find Tipton seated in a high backed rattan wicker chair, holding a sea shell] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Know what this is, Mike?
[Tipton offers the shell to Anthony]
Michael Anthony: It's a sea shell, of course.
[Anthony inspects the shell closer]
Michael Anthony: Chambered nautilus, isn't it, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Well, it was. Now it's only the empty shell - the house in which the nautilus once lived. Here's how the house of nautilus looks inside.
[Tipton offers the house to Anthony]
Michael Anthony: [Anthony examines the house] A long corridor of separate chambers.
John Beresford Tipton: No one quite knows why, as the nautilus grows, it moves forward into a new chamber and seals off the past room in which it lived - locks the door and moves into the future. Some people live like that, Mike: keep their past in an airtight compartment, locked away.
[Tipton hands over envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony bows and departs]


"The Millionaire: The Olivia Grainger Story (#2.36)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the estate tack room to discover Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk amidst numerous equine-related items such as figures, statues, photos, bridals and other objects. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[waving at the objects]
John Beresford Tipton: these statues represent some of Silverstone's greatest champions. They were all wonderful animals but in all their grace and beauty, they lived by instinct alone. Quite different from some humans who refuse to submit to any of their basic instincts.
Michael Anthony: That can make for a dull life, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I wonder what it does to that dull life if given a million dollars.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Jerry Bell (#3.25)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the Tipton study, where he discovers Tipton seated in a high backed chair at his desk. Only Tipton's left arm is visible to the viewers] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike,
[Pointing to a bust on a pedestal]
John Beresford Tipton: what do you think of my new friend?
Michael Anthony: [Anthony walks over to examine the bust, which is that of a prehistoric man] Very interesting, sir. It's a representation of Cro-Magnon man, isn't it?
John Beresford Tipton: Right, Mike. And even the most reputable scholars disagree on how many hundreds of thousands of years ago he lived. But he is a man, Mike. And as a man, there was one thing, I daresay, that he had in common with every man and every woman who lives today.
Michael Anthony: What is that, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: The one thing everyone has always wanted,
[Tipton waives at the bust]
John Beresford Tipton: even this fellow: love, which, of course, has many forms.
[Tipton hands over an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: When you deliver this, Mike, you may see a kind of love that you've never quite known about before.
[Anthony bows and turns to depart]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Gilbert Burton (#5.32)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the garden which has a section set aside for birds. Anthony sees Tipton seated in a high backed outdoor chair with only his hands visible to the viewers. Tipton has a pigeon in his lap, which he is stroking] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I'm doing my bird watching the easy way.
Michael Anthony: It does look more comfortable than crouching in the underbrush or crawling through a swamp.
John Beresford Tipton: It's more comfortable, Mike. But as you can see, I'm limited to pigeons.
Michael Anthony: But you are enjoying yourself, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Yes - pigeons are very enjoyable and very trusting. That's probably the way pigeons came to be applied to certain people.
Michael Anthony: You mean people who are easily fooled?
John Beresford Tipton: That's right, Mike.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire.
[Anthony accepts the envelopes, bows, turns and departs]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Henry Banning (#5.28)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters a bedroom to observe Tipton sitting in a high backed chair with only his right hand visible to the viewers. The bedroom is decorated as a young man would have adorned it, with college pennants and toys] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: You've never been in this room before, have you, Mike?
Michael Anthony: [Looking around the room] It's quite unique, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: It's an exact replica of my room as a boy.
Michael Anthony: [Picking up a toy off a table] You mean you had model rockets back then, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: No, Mike - I believe I had ship's models. I've kept the room up to date.
[Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
Michael Anthony: [Reviewing the name on the envelope] A boy, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Chuckling] And this one's been a boy for many, many years.
[Anthony furrows his brow and bows]


"The Millionaire: The Jill Mayfield Story (#2.37)" (1956)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the trophy room, where he discovers Tipton, hidden behind a puppet stage, holding up two puppets]
[Anthony, smiling, peers into the bottom of the stage]
Michael Anthony: You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I want you to meet two friends.
[the puppets bow to Anthony, who bows back. Tipton chuckles]
John Beresford Tipton: Do you recognize them?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir - Punch and Judy. Every child the world over knows them.
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, for centuries they've made people laugh and cry. Yet, of their own feelings, we know nothing. If they had life, would they have been happy, discontent, hopeful, afraid?
Michael Anthony: I'm sure I don't know, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: I want to know, Mike. I want to know what they would do if they had the chance.
[Puppet Judy leaves the stage and goes below momentarily. Returning, Judy hands an envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Here's the name of someone, Mike, who wants a chance. One million dollars.
[Anthony accepts the envelope]


"The Millionaire: Millionaire Mark Fleming (#6.1)" (1959)
Michael Anthony: [Entering study] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: [Toying with bronzed baby shoes] Mike, remember your childhood?
Michael Anthony: Yes, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: Ever want to go back to it?
Michael Anthony: [Briefly picks up baby shoes, then puts them down] It was a very happy one, sir. But I think it would be a mistake to go back, even if you could.
John Beresford Tipton: You're very wise. To most people, childhood is a symbol of carefree, sunny days. But to others, a return would be a fearful journey.
[Gives envelope to Anthony]
John Beresford Tipton: Our next millionaire, Mike.
[Anthony accepts envelope, bows, departs]


"The Millionaire: The Jim Driskill Story (#3.22)" (1957)
Michael Anthony: [Anthony enters the study to see Tipton seated in a high backed chair reviewing a ledger on his desk. Only Tipton's left hand is visible to viewers as cigar smoke wafts over his head] You sent for me, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Mike, I've been thinking about bravery.
Michael Anthony: Bravery, sir?
John Beresford Tipton: Yes, Mike. What does the word mean to you?
Michael Anthony: Well, I think the word means facing difficulty without fear.
John Beresford Tipton: Without fear? No, I can't agree with you, Mike. I feel that bravery is the ability to face up to difficult situations not without fear but in spite of great and overwhelming fear.
Michael Anthony: That's an interesting point of view, sir.
John Beresford Tipton: [Tipton hands an envelope to Anthony] Deliver this, Mike. It will take you to a man who either is or is not brave. It all depends on your point of view.
[Anthony accepts the envelope and bows]