Gil Favor
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Quotes for
Gil Favor (Character)
from "Rawhide" (1959)

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"Rawhide: Incident with an Executioner (#1.3)" (1959)
Gil Favor: On the Sedalia Trail, pushing a herd of three thousand mixed head, you're always a long ways from nowhere. Ahead - trouble, known and unknown. Behind - owners depending on the drive, counting on men crazy enough to push it. Like me - Gil Favor, trail boss.

Gil Favor: Is it civilized to shoot a man in the back in Rhode Island, Mr. Vanryzin?


"Rawhide: Incident of the Arana Sacar (#2.25)" (1960)
Gil Favor: This is a drover
[scene with character Joe Scarlet]
Gil Favor: . He's tough and he's durable. He has to match his strength and skill against the orneriness of cattle. Normally he's steady goin' and dependable, 'cept once in a while, when the orneriness of the cattle rubs off on him. Then I've got a problem, and usually it's a bad one. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Calico Gun (#1.15)" (1959)
Gil Favor: You run into a lot of things on a cattle drive before you get where you're goin'. Stampedes, floods, sickness. But one thing's with you all the time. You can't get away from it, you can't lick it - the same faces day after day, week after week. You look at each other, or you look at the cattle. After a while, you can't tell the difference. I'm getting that way myself. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Slavemaster (#3.5)" (1960)
Gil Favor: Dependin' on where you come from, you call steers brush splitters, cactus boomers, critters, rawhides, scalawags, or baccas. The drovers whose job it is to get 'em where they're goin' call 'em beeves. I'm one of those drovers. We've been pushin' this herd for almost five hundred miles, and it's still nearly twice that to Sedalia, Missouri. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Murder Steer (#2.28)" (1960)
Gil Favor: In those eastern newspapers, they write about the lawlessness of the West. But they don't know what it really means to live that way. It means, in time of trouble, you've got no help but the quickness of your own right hand. No judge but your own good sense, especially on trail herd. Most of the time you're one hundred miles from anyone wearin' a lawman's star. So keepin' order is up to me. Name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Curious Street (#1.13)" (1959)
Gil Favor: When a man's pushing ornery cows over the Sedalia Trail, he's gotta hope for the best, expect the worse. You never know what the cows'll do - it keeps a man jumping, always on the watch. But I wouldn't trade the job. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Town in Terror (#1.9)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Ridin' herd over a long trail may be a headache, but I can tell you it's never boresome, even when it's goin' smooth. There's plenty of sweet grass, blue skies, clear spring water. You ride lazy, thinkin' of what you left behind, dreamin' of what's ahead. Ridin' easy doesn't come often on a drive. When you're pushin' three thousand head and twenty hands, there's always something about to happen. Whatever it is, and whenever it comes up, I gotta meet it. That's my job. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Dog Days (#1.14)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Every once in a while, you have to get away from the herd, so you can listen to the sound of it. You can tell a lot from the way the cattle bawl. But the same can't be said for the drovers you hire along the way. It's hard to judge a man by his voice. That's why we keep gainin' some, losin' others. It's my job to judge, and sometimes I miss. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Night Visitor (#3.4)" (1960)
Gil Favor: Whenever you hear a fella tellin' you about how he rode with a trail herd of five, ten thousand steers, you can call him a liar. The most any crew can handle and keep safe is about three thousand - the size of this herd. With the hazards of weather, terrain, stampedes, and Indian raids, that's plenty. Then there's the remuda, the extra horses. That's maybe the most valuable part of the herd, and the most vulnerable. Put that many animals together, they spell trouble. And it's my trouble. Gil Favor's the name, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident at Zebulon (#6.22)" (1964)
Jim Quince: Mr. Favor, we all know how you feel. Every one of us.
Gil Favor: You ever been horsewhipped?
Jim Quince: No I haven't.
Gil Favor: I don't think you do.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Misplaced Indians (#1.16)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Pointing 'em north, most things you can calculate. Your men, for instance. You know what to expect. But there's one thing you can't calculate on - the people who cross your trail. The thousand ways they can make their troubles yours. You find that out real quick in my job. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Golden Calf (#1.10)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Breeding ground of the cattle is the southern tip of Texas, and the markets are over a thousand miles away. A day's drive on the Sedalia Trail is eight, ten miles at the most. Fine and easy when the prairie grass is fresh and the river's wet. But you have to keep goin' when the grasses are parched, when the water has disappeared under the drought. That's when the cows become skittish, hard to manage. Nobody takes his boots off as long as it lasts. The last one to take his boots off is me - Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Valley in Shadow (#2.10)" (1959)
Gil Favor: There's money in beef, but it doesn't come easy. There's a market for all the steers you can raise. But it's a thousand miles away. You get top prices only for top cattle. Pushin' the herd up the trail is only half the job. You've gotta get in there in good shape. It takes tough men workin' long hours for low wages, starin' trouble in the face at every bend in the trail. I'm one of 'em. Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident at Dangerfield Dip (#2.3)" (1959)
Gil Favor: On the trail to Sedalia, Missouri - day to day - you fall into the habit of tryin' to read your men, guess what makes 'em tick. But you don't make much headway. Isn't easy to figure grown-up humans who take this kind of life for thirty bucks a month and keep. So you finally give up. And you're just glad there's a breed like 'em to get the beeves to where they're goin'. I've got a good reason to be glad. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident Below the Brazos (#1.18)" (1959)
Gil Favor: In the trail towns, they say the only thing wilder than Texas steers are the cowhands who drive 'em. So if a big herd is gonna reach the market, there has to be someone tough enough to handle the crew and the cattle and anything else they might get in the way during a thousand slow, grinding miles. And it's a job, and it's mine. Gil Favor's my name - trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Roman Candles (#2.2)" (1959)
Gil Favor: On a trail drive, a man can find the things he wants - a sense of God's good earth, the room to move in, a job to be done. Of course, there's not always enough water, and you can't always choose your own company. There's some that say that's all that's wrong with Hell. That's up to me to handle - the good and bad. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of a Burst of Evil (#1.22)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Pretty hard to beat it when it sets in solid - boredom. You can feel it close in like heat around your riders, watch it dull 'em to the point where the drive gets to be something they'd just as soon forget. But they can't afford to forget it. I can't afford to let 'em. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Chubasco (#1.12)" (1959)
Gil Favor: On a drive, the days and nights get mighty big. There's a lot of danger a man can understand, and a lot he can't. That's the kind I hate, the kind I can't understand. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Dry Drive (#1.19)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Bringin' a herd up through the plains of Texas on the Sedalia, Missouri Trail, you need three things: one of them, air, we have more than enough of. Another, grass, usually in good supply. But the third is another story. Iy's always with us, the need for water. Sometimes it's a real job to find it. And it's my job. Gil Favor, trail herd boss.


"Rawhide: Incident at Jacob's Well (#2.5)" (1959)
Gil Favor: On a trail drive, you pick your men to be at least as smart as the cows. The cows know enough to drink up when there's water, to stop and eat when there's food. The men can do that, too, but the rest of their thinking - man or beast - I'm supposed to do for 'em, whether I do it right or not. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident in the Garden of Eden (#2.32)" (1960)
Gil Favor: On the Sedalia Trail, the weather's like a Texas woman: contrary and full of little tricks to keep a man off balance. No use tryin' to outguess either one of 'em. If they give you trouble, all you can do is pray for a change, hope for the best. I've had a passing acquaintance with both. Name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Judas Trap (#1.20)" (1959)
Gil Favor: A human bein' can take a lot of punishment. You find that out real quick when you drive cattle. You head along a thousand miles of dust, you cuss the day that man ever decided to eat beef. We're tryin' to bring it to the market: Sedalia, Missouri. We don't always like what we have to do to get there. But that's part of my job. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident at Dragoon Crossing (#3.3)" (1960)
Gil Favor: Takin' a herd north, you have to trail across nearly a thousand miles of the wrinkled skin of earth. Over terrain as strange and different as paradise above from the hot place below. Mostly its too rough or too steep, too wet or dry, too hot or cold, too windy, too lonely. But you take what comes and find a way to move the beeves on through. At least you try. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident at Alabaster Plain (#1.2)" (1959)
Gil Favor: A thousand miles from San Antonio to the railhead at Sedalia, Missouri. We got three thousand head of Texas cattle that don't want to go. When everything's right, we cover eight miles a day. But how often are things right? The weather's what hits you the hardest between the eyes. Boiling sun that dries up the water, brings the dust and sand. Storms that mill the cattle, touch off stampedes. The way the land lies can hurt you, too, wearing off pounds with every step the beeves take. But the way to even things up is to hire the best men in the business. I got 'em. Pete Nolan, scout. Rowdy Yates, new as they come, but he's got the makings. Joe Scarlet, swing. Jim Quince, flank. And the man who can make or break the drive - the cook, Wishbone. And the cook's louse - his name is Mushy. And somebody's gotta kick this whole kit and kaboodle along. That's me. Gil Favor, trail boss. I ride point.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Painted Lady (#3.26)" (1961)
Gil Favor: Sometimes it gets right peaceful on a trail drive. You're travelin' easy in pretty country, with a trail broke herd actin' gentle as lambs. Weather's fine, air's fresh, sun's warm. That's when I begin to worry. Somethin's bound to happen. And out of all the bad things that might be, it usually turns out to be the kind of trouble you least expect. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident West of Lano (#1.8)" (1959)
Gil Favor: I got a cousin, woman, teaches in a school house back East. She tells me those boys daydream about becomin' cowboys. Of all the jobs a man could pick, why'd he ever want to choose this way to make a livin'? Three thousand head of God's lowest form of life, cattle. If they don't die of rick fever, strangle in a dust storm or trample their fool selves to death, then the market'll go gown to two cents a pound on the hoof. They might as well have died before we set out. But they need food back East. It's my job to get this herd movin'. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Coyote Weed (#1.11)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Pushin' cattle up the Sedalia Trail's a thousand miles of aching bones and deep madness. You lose a lot of men. Some men never make it. Sometimes you don't rightly think a man was ever born who could. Well, men fool you sometimes, especially on a cattle drive. I ought to know. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Haunted Hills (#2.8)" (1959)
Gil Favor: When things are goin' right on a drive, a trail hand will call everything from a calf to a ten-year old bull, a cow. When they're not goin' right, which is most of the time, he'll call cattle lots of other names, very few of them are complimentary. I know 'em all. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Widowed Dove (#1.4)" (1959)
Gil Favor: The Sedalia Trail is a thousand miles of dust, deep river crossings, and stampedes, a job forgotten by those who wait for their cattle at the end of the drive. But not forgotten by the men in the saddle who bring the cattle through. Like me - Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident in No Man's Land (#1.21)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Those cows have a right to bellow. On a drive like this, they often have to go for days without grass or water. The men drivin' 'em have a right to gripe. Often they have to go without food, water, and sleep. I have a right to worry about both, man and beast. That's part of my job. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of Fear in the Streets (#1.17)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Ask any townsman along the Sedalia, Missouri Trail and he'll tell you that drovers are nothin' but trouble. They work hard, play hard, fight hard. They're sons of the devil. But if you want to hear their side, just ask me. Favor's my name, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Tumbleweed Wagon (#1.1)" (1959)
Gil Favor: It's not the roundin' up and the ropin' and the brandin' of the cattle that's the big problem for ranchers. It's gettin' 'em to market - fifteen hundred bone weary miles from the southern tip of Texas to the railhead at Sedalia. That's where I come in. Gil Favor's my name - trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident at Barker Springs (#1.7)" (1959)
Gil Favor: I got a cousin, woman, teaches in a school house back East. She tells me those boys daydream about becomin' cowboys. Of all the jobs a man could pick, why'd he ever want to choose this way to make a livin'? Three thousand head of God's lowest form of life, cattle. If they don't die of rick fever, strangle in a dust storm or trample their fool selves to death, then the market'll go gown to two cents a pound on the hoof. They might as well have died before we set out. But they need food back East. It's my job to get this herd movin'. My name's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Devil and His Due (#2.15)" (1960)
Gil Favor: The cowhand's hat is the first thing he puts on when he gets up. And the last thing he takes off when he beds down. Some of the wide brim shades his eyes from the sun. In winter, he pulls the brim down, ties it over his ears to avoid frostbite. Uses the crown as a bucker and the brim as a drinkin' cup. That's why a cowhand'll get the best hat he can. 'Cause it's got to serve a dozen purposes its maker never dreamed of. The same thing goes for the men wearin' the hats. I know. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident on the Edge of Madness (#1.5)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Cattle drive's mostly hard work, doin' without, bein' alone. It's warming yourself in a rainstorm with no fuel but buffalo chips, speadin' your duds on an anthill to get rid of the vermin. It's bein' and doin' things you don't rightly ask of two-legged humans, unless they're cowboys. Add discipline and loyalty to the list, all for thirty dollars a month. It's a big strain on a man. You have to expect something to give along the way, and bust wide open. I'm in a position to know. Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Power and the Plow (#1.6)" (1959)
Gil Favor: The Sedalia Trail's as rough as it is long. You might say deuces are wild the way everything comes in twos. In the low country, two inches of rain in half an hour. Coming through the passes, it was two feet of snow. On this side of the mountain, we had two brushes with rustlers. Ended up burying two hands. Now it's been two days since grass and water. But my job's to kick this herd along no matter what. The only way I know to get a thing done is to keep trying. Gil Favor's my name, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of His Brother's Keeper (#3.21)" (1961)
Gil Favor: There's one good thing you can say about drivin' a herd up the Sedalia Trail. Beeves stay beeves. The drovers stay human, and trouble is always saddlin'up a fresh horse, preparin' to ride with you. What you can't be sure of is the direction it's comin' from, the face it's gonna be wearin' the name it'll be travelin' under. What you can be sure of is that trouble knows your name. Mine's Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Blue Fire (#2.11)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Old timers always say, 'It doesn't storm like it used to.' When you're on a trail drive, you get on intimate terms with the weather. You're away from home maybe eight, nine months, and you may not sleep under a roof the whole time. Rain, sleet, snow - whatever it has to offer, it's part of the job, my job. Gil Favor's the name, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Shambling Man (#2.4)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Cows are senseless, stupid beasts. They go halfway across the continent just to be slaughtered. The trouble is, nobody ever trained 'em to go alone. It takes men to push a herd north. Men and time and sometimes pain. That's where I come in. I'm one of the men. Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Druid Curse (#2.13)" (1960)
Gil Favor: When it comes to cattle, you can brand 'em with a bar brand, a bench brand, or a bosell brand, which is a stripe runnin' around the cow's nose. Or you can use a runnin' or swingin' brand, a tumblin' or a walkin' brand, whose lower part looks like feet. But whichever you use, from then on, you know who the cow belongs to. When it comes to men, though, it's not that easy. They don't wear brands. What herd they're runnin' with, what loyalties they got, is anybody's guess. And I can't afford to guess. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Dust Flower (#2.20)" (1960)
Gil Favor: It sounds simple when you start out: Get the herd to Abilene. Before you're halfway there, the cattle are the least of your worries. I know. Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Stalking Death (#2.9)" (1959)
Gil Favor: Pushin' a trail drive is like movin' a whole town that isn't sure it wants to be moved. Some of its people are willin' - some aren't. You start out with problems, then you meet up with new ones. Whatever they are, however they happen, they have to be met. That's my job. Gil Favor's my name, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Tinker's Dam (#2.17)" (1960)
Gil Favor: It takes three things to make a trail drive: cattle, horses and men. And some say two because a man without a horse is no man at all. There are mornin's when I think a horse without a man would be better. I should know men by now, but I keep learnin'. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident of the Dancing Death (#2.24)" (1960)
Gil Favor: Only thing certain about a trail drive is the uncertainty. The expected never seems to happen. The surprise is always poppin' up, most of the time bringin' trouble. When it hits, there's no countin' on somebody else to handle it. That's my job, mine alone. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.


"Rawhide: Incident at the Buffalo Smokehouse (#2.7)" (1959)
Gil Favor: [Writing in a journal] The trail log says every workin' cowhand has a string of horses assigned to him. That string's made up of the different kinds he's gonna need. Circle horse, cuttin' horse, a ropin' horse, one or two broncos. He works with 'em, worries over 'em, and wouldn't be worth a brass nickel without 'em. Same goes for me, 'cept my string isn't horses - it's men. I'm Gil Favor, trail boss.