Portia
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Quotes for
Portia (Character)
from The Merchant of Venice (2004)

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The Merchant of Venice (2004)
Bassanio: Promise me life, and I'll confess the truth.
Portia: Well then, confess, and live.
Bassanio: 'Confess' and 'love' had been the very sum of my confession.

Portia: The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath.

Portia: If doing were as easy as knowing what were good to do, chapels had been churches and poor men's cottages princes' palaces.

Bassanio: [confirming her love to him] Like one of two contending in a prize That thinks he has done well in people's eyes Hearing applause and universal shout Giddy in spirit, still gazing in a doubt As doubtful whether what I see be true Until confirmed, signed, ratified... by you .
Portia: You see me, lord Bassanio, where I stand, such as I am. Though for myself alone I would not be ambitious in my wish to wish myself much better, yet for you, I would be treble twenty times myself. A thousand times more fair, ten thousand times more rich, that only to stand high in your account, I might in virtues, beauties, livings, friends, exceed account. But the full sum of me is sum of something which, to term in gross, is an unlessoned girl, unschooled, unpractised. Happy in this, she is not yet so old that she may learn. Happier than this, she is not bred so dull that she may learn. Happiest of all, is that her gentle spirit commits itself to yours to be directed as by her governor, her lord, her king. This house, these servants, and this same myself are yours .

Portia: The quality of mercy is not strained, it droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven upon the place beneath. It is twice blessed - it blesseth him that gives and him that takes. 'Tis mightiest in the mighty. It becomes the throned monarch better than his crown. His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, the attribute to awe and majesty wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings. But mercy is above this sceptred sway. It is enthroned in the heart of kings. It is an attribute to God himself and earthly power doth then show likest God's when mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, though justice be your plea, consider this. That in the course of justice, none of us should see salvation. We do pray for mercy and that same prayer doth teach us all to render the deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much to mitigate the justice of your plea,