Bassanio
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Quotes for
Bassanio (Character)
from The Merchant of Venice (2004)

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The Merchant of Venice (2004)
Bassanio: Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice.

Bassanio: Promise me life, and I'll confess the truth.
Portia: Well then, confess, and live.
Bassanio: 'Confess' and 'love' had been the very sum of my confession.

Bassanio: When I told you my state was nothing, I should then have told you that I was worse than nothing; for, indeed, I have engag'd myself to a dear friend, engag'd my friend to his mere enemy, to feed my means.

Shylock: I am not bound to please thee with my answer.
Bassanio: Do all men kill the things they do not love?
Shylock: Hates any man the thing he would not kill?
Bassanio: Every offence is not a hate at first.
Shylock: What! wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?

Bassanio: For thy three thousand ducats here is six.
Shylock: If every ducat in six thousand ducats were in six parts and every part a ducat, I would not draw them; I would have my bond.

Bassanio: So may the outward shows be least themselves: The world is still deceived with ornament.

Bassanio: Thy paleness moves me more than eloquence; And here choose I; joy be the consequence!

Bassanio: Why, I were best to cut my left hand off And swear I lost the ring defending it.

Bassanio: In Belmont is a lady richly left - and she is fair, and fairer than that word - of wondrous virtues. Sometimes, from her eyes I did receive fair... speechless messages. Her name is Portia, no less a beauty than Cato's daughter, Brutus' Portia. Nor is the wide world ignorant of her worth,for the four winds blow in from every coast renowned suitors. O my Antonio, had I but the means to hold a rival place with one of them then I should question less be fortunate.

Bassanio: So may the outward shows be least themselves. The world is still deceived with ornament. In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt but being seasoned with a gracious voice obscures the show of evil? In religion, what damned error but some sober brow will bless it and approve it with a text, hiding the grossness with fair... ornament? Look on beauty and you shall see 'tis purchased by the weight. Therefore, thou gaudy gold, I will none of you. Nor none of you, O pale and common drudge between man and man. But you, O meagre lead, which rather threatenest than dost promise aught, your paleness moves me more... than eloquence. Here choose I. Joy be the consequence. O love, be moderate, allay your ecstasy, I feel too much your blessing - make it less for fear I surfeit.

Bassanio: So may the outward shows be least themselves. The world is still deceived with ornament. In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt but being seasoned with a gracious voice obscures the show of evil? In religion, what damned error but some sober brow will bless it and approve it with a text, hiding the grossness with fair... ornament? Look on beauty and you shall see 'tis purchased by the weight. Therefore, thou gaudy gold, I will none of you. Nor none of you, O pale and common drudge between man and man. But you, O meagre lead, which rather threatenest than dost promise aught, your paleness moves me more... than eloquence. Here choose I. Joy be the consequence.

Bassanio: [confirming her love to him] Like one of two contending in a prize That thinks he has done well in people's eyes Hearing applause and universal shout Giddy in spirit, still gazing in a doubt As doubtful whether what I see be true Until confirmed, signed, ratified... by you .
Portia: You see me, lord Bassanio, where I stand, such as I am. Though for myself alone I would not be ambitious in my wish to wish myself much better, yet for you, I would be treble twenty times myself. A thousand times more fair, ten thousand times more rich, that only to stand high in your account, I might in virtues, beauties, livings, friends, exceed account. But the full sum of me is sum of something which, to term in gross, is an unlessoned girl, unschooled, unpractised. Happy in this, she is not yet so old that she may learn. Happier than this, she is not bred so dull that she may learn. Happiest of all, is that her gentle spirit commits itself to yours to be directed as by her governor, her lord, her king. This house, these servants, and this same myself are yours .