IMDb > Orac (Character) > Quotes
No Photo Available
Quicklinks
Top Links
main detailsbiographyby votesphoto galleryquotes
Filmographies
by yearby typeby ratingsby votesby TV seriesby genreby keyword
Biographical
biography
Did You Know?
photo galleryquotes

Quotes for
Orac (Character)
from "Blakes 7" (1978)

The content of this page was created by users. It has not been screened or verified by IMDb staff.
"Blakes 7: Blake (#4.13)" (1981)
Avon: Orac, what proof do we have that Blake is on Gauda Prime?
Orac: That is where his trail ends.
Tarrant: What trail? Explain.
Orac: The chain of cause and effect amounts to a trail, if you can follow it.
Vila: I can't even follow you.
Orac: Everything has an effect on everything else around it. It is not easy to trace one line through the pattern of infinity, but in this case, I have. Blake is on Gauda Prime.

Orac: Law must be established before the benefits of law can be restored.
Avon: It is the day of the bounty hunter.
Avon: [cut to close-up of Vila] Thieves,
Avon: [cut to close-up of Dayna, pan to Soolin] killers,
Avon: [cut to close-up of Tarrant] mercenaries,
Avon: [cut to close-up of Avon; he smiles, continuing] psychopaths, are as unwelcome now as the farmers once were.

Slave: Uh, I don't wish to interrupt, Master...
Orac: Then kindly don't.
Slave: I wasn't talking to you.
Orac: You were attempting to override a superior system. Be silent.

[Scorpio is about to crash]
Orac: The ground is very close, sir.
Tarrant: I know that!


"Blakes 7: Ultraworld (#3.10)" (1980)
[Vila is teaching Orac riddles]
Vila: No, Orac, you don't understand. I say "Where to space pilots leave their ships?" and you say, "I don't know, where do space pilots leave their ships?"
Orac: And supposing I don't wish to know that?
Vila: But you've got to say it or the riddle won't work.
Orac: It is plainly nonsensical.
Vila: Of course. That's the whole idea.
Orac: I fail to see why I take part in a meaningless, illogical conversation. It doesn't make sense and is therefore a waste of time. I'm shutting down.
Vila: Do it for me this once, Orac, please. Ready? Where do space pilots leave their ships?
Orac: I don't know. Where do space pilots leave their ships?
Vila: At parking meteors.
[Vila laughs. Orac shuts off indignantly]

Vila: Knock, knock.
Orac: Who's there?
Vila: Atch.
Orac: Atch who?
Vila: Sorry, I didn't know you had a cold.
Orac: A cold what?
Vila: No, not a cold what. Just a cold. You know, cold, chill.
Orac: I am not subject to colds and chills. Some trace deposits on my anodizers perhaps, but I am quite capable of dealing with that myself.
Vila: [giving up] Forget it. Go back to sleep.
Orac: Is this another riddle?
Vila: No.

Orac: The idiosyncratic syntax of riddles interests me. They seem to depend for their effect on solecisms and grammatical discrepancies.
Vila: [totally confused] Eh?
Orac: Do you have another riddle for me to analyze?
Vila: You'd only spoil it.
Orac: I thought you liked riddles.
Vila: I do when I'm allowed to tell them properly. All you're interested in is the idiotic tintax or something.
Orac: That's very clever.
Vila: What is?
Orac: For idiosyncratic syntax you substituted idiotic tintax. Yes, very good.
Vila: [brightening] Is it?
Orac: Another one, please.
Vila: Right. What's the best cure for water on the brain?
Orac: I don't know. What is the best cure for water on the brain?
Vila: A tap on the head.
Orac: A tap on the head. Yes, I see. In this instance the word tap has a double meaning, as in to strike something and as a device for controlling the release of fluid from a tank or pipe. The fluid referred to is water, therefore, tap on the head has two ambivalent meanings, one pertaining to the striking of the cranium...
[Vila grabs his head in frustration]

Orac: The idiosyncratic syntax of riddles interests me. They seem to depend for their effect on solecisms and grammatical discrepancies.
Vila Restal: [totally confused] Eh?
Orac: Do you have another riddle for me to analyze?
Vila Restal: You'd only spoil it.
Orac: I thought you liked riddles.
Vila Restal: I do when I'm allowed to tell them properly. All you're interested in is the idiotic tin tax or something.
Orac: That's very clever.
Vila Restal: What is?
Orac: For "idiosyncratic syntax" you substituted "idiotic tin tax". Yes, very good.
Vila Restal: [brightening] Is it?
Orac: Another one, please.
Vila Restal: Right. What's the best cure for water on the brain?
Orac: I don't know. What is the best cure for water on the brain?
Vila Restal: A tap on the head.
Orac: "A tap on the head." Yes, I see. In this instance the word "tap" has a double meaning, as in to strike something and as a device for controlling the release of fluid from a tank or pipe. The fluid referred to is water, therefore, "tap on the head" has two ambivalent meanings, one pertaining to the striking of the cranium...
[Vila grabs his head in frustration]


"Blakes 7: Headhunter (#4.6)" (1981)
[Orac is possessed by an evil android]
Orac: Join us, Soolin. We can fulfill your every desire.
Soolin: [turning Orac off] You wouldn't know where to start.

[Scorpio's life support has failed, leaving Tarrant and Vila stranded]
Kerr Avon: [to Orac] Situation.
Orac: Total systems failure.
Dayna Mellanby: They'll be dying up there!
Kerr Avon: Not yet!
Soolin: They won't have long.
Kerr Avon: They have oxygen units and suits.
Dayna Mellanby: In the dark? Under those conditions?
Kerr Avon: Orac?
Orac: They must be left there!
Kerr Avon: To die?
Orac: There is no option. To reopen teleport contact could expose the base to undefined systems influence.
[pause]
Kerr Avon: Oh, you'll have to do better than that, Orac, if you expect me to *kill* them.

[Avon has ordered Orac to restore teleport contact with Scorpio so they can rescue Vila and Tarrant]
Kerr Avon: Is it restored?
Orac: I am obliged to do as you tell me, even though I know it to be wrong.
Kerr Avon: Only following orders? That's not very original, Orac.
Orac: There is nothing very original about domination, as you will discover.

Soolin: Well, Orac?
Orac: Prospects terminal.
Soolin: Terminal?
Orac: The survival of organic humanoid life is improbable.
Soolin: Are you talking about Vila and Tarrant?
Orac: All organic humanoid life throughout the galaxy is at hazard.
Soolin: Let's stick to medicine, Orac. Leave the philosophy for later.


"Blakes 7: Games (#4.8)" (1981)
Kerr Avon: [into communicator] Dayna, we're down safe in Orbiter and proceeding.
Gambit, Orac: [in unison] Countdown twelve minutes, twenty seconds, and running.
Vila Restal: What does that mean?
Kerr Avon: I imagine that if we're not out of here by the time it hits zero, we might regret it.
[Soolin presses the button to reveal the screen and start the game. She picks up the electronic pistol]
Gambit, Orac: Control system feedback is through the weapon. The game adjusts to meet, and on the last shot, exceed the proficiency of the players.
Soolin: You have to outshoot yourself.
Del Tarrant: Stupid game.
Soolin: Not really. Finally a game worth playing.

Orac: A computer must, by definition, be logical. But it can also mirror the logic of its creator.
Soolin: You mean it's an extension of his mind.
Orac: [testily] No, that is *not* what I mean.
Soolin: His personality, then.
Orac: [more considerate] A better definition, but still not quite accurate.
Kerr Avon: Would it know how the booby traps on the orbiter are programmed?
Orac: As yet, I don't have enough data to answer that question.
Kerr Avon: [growing impatient] *If* it knew, could you extract the information from it?
[Orac doesn't respond immediately. Avon gives Orac a whack out of pique]
Kerr Avon: Come on! That's a simple enough question.
Orac: There might be problems.
Kerr Avon: Why? You have extracted information from Federation computers before now. This is just a hodgepodge of three or four of them. You have already said that it is inferior to you.
Orac: The difficulty is not technical. It's more one of, uh, attitude.
Kerr Avon: Ah. You mean the *logic* of its creator.
Orac: Exactly. Let me remind you of ancient Earth mythology: the Delphic Oracle would answer questions truthfully without giving a true answer.
Kerr Avon: So what we need is not the right answer, but the right question.
Soolin: And in circumstances where any mistake would prove fatal?

Orac, Gambit: [in unison] The orbiter is preprogrammed. Flight power depends on the distance and intensity of each star the feldon panels are locked into. The successful completion of a game continues the sequence. To regain control, you must complete the coded sequence of star sources.
Vila Restal: What about the feldon crystals?
Kerr Avon: Gambit?
Orac, Gambit: This game will reveal the entrance.
Soolin: All we have to do is lock on to the right star.
Orac: It is possible that we've just received the right answer to the wrong question.


"Blakes 7: Horizon (#2.4)" (1979)
[Orac is teaching Gan something when Cally enters]
Cally: How is the lesson?
Gan: Difficult.
Cally: Well, Orac isn't exactly the ideal teacher.
Gan: Well, I'm not exactly the ideal pupil.
Orac: That is because you are too easily distracted.

Avon: If I go alone, can I pilot the Liberator indefinitely?
Orac: With the help of the automatics, of course you can.
Avon: I know that.
Orac: [testily] Then why did you ask the question?
Avon: [Avon smiles] I didn't. How long can I maintain myself?
Orac: Is *that* a question?
Avon: Yes.
Orac: We have concentrated food for one person for a thousand years.
Avon: And our power is self-regenerating.
Orac: Affirmative.
Avon: Can you plot courses to keep out of the range of any known spaceship manned by the Federation?
Orac: The battle and navigation computers can handle that perfectly adequately.
Avon: I asked if *you* could.
Orac: Of course, should it be necessary.
Avon: Failing that, we are powerful enough to resist all but an attack by three Federation pursuit ships at once.
Orac: Is that a question?
Avon: No. If we go now, we can sail the universe for as long as we like in reasonable safety, provided we keep out of everybody's way and we do not do anything rash.
Orac: No data available to answer the question... if it was a question.
Avon: I put it to you as a possibility. I request the odds.
Orac: The odds would be three point five to one on survival.
Avon: [Resolute:] Therefore I do not need Blake, I do not need any of the others...
Orac: Is that a question?
Avon: ...I do not need anybody at all.
Orac: Is that a question? I - I - I must ask you to be more specific!
Avon: [snaps out of his moment:] Shut up, Orac.


"Blakes 7: Redemption (#2.1)" (1979)
Roj Blake: Orac, why won't you give us the background to that prediction?
Orac: Because that would invalidate the prediction.
Roj Blake: And if we knew the future in detail we could change it, and so it wouldn't be the future.
Orac: Correct. That is the paradox of prediction.

Avon: Now then, Orac. Are you going to function or are you not?
Orac: All principal circuits are operating at full capacity and cannot receive new programs at this time.
Roj Blake: Well, *clear* the circuits! This is priority!
Orac: Circuit clearance and reprogramming will take precisely one hour and thirty-seven point nine seconds.
Roj Blake: That could be just a little late.
Orac: [Testily:] State your program requirements; they will be implemented when capacity is available.


"Blakes 7: Orbit (#4.11)" (1981)
[the shuttle will crash unless Avon can lighten it by seventy kilos]
Avon: Not enough! Not nearly enough! Dammit, what weighs seventy kilos?
Orac: Vila weighs seventy-three kilos, Avon.

Egrorian: Orac, what was the subject of my degree thesis at Belhangria University?
Orac: Your paper E stroke nine stroke six-zero-four-four was on particle physics and dealt specifically with the properties of rissions. It was marked Beta plus, Egrorian.
Pinder: [amused] Only Beta plus, Egrorian?
Egrorian: Pinder, you're to be seen and not heard, remember?
Avon: If Orac has a fault, it is a tendency to give more information than is requested.
Vila: Or less information than requested.
Avon: But seldom *just* the information that is requested.
Orac: [continuing] That degree was subsequently rescinded for gross misconduct.
Egrorian: [angry] That's enough, Orac!


"Blakes 7: Power (#4.2)" (1981)
Del Tarrant: Orac, in sixteen minutes this base will be destroyed and you with it. Is there anything logically more important than trying to stop that happening?
Orac: Yes. The most logical course of action is to transport me to safety with all due urgency.

Del Tarrant: Orac, in sixteen minutes this base will be destroyed and you with it. Is there anything logically more important than trying to stop that happening?
Orac: Yes. The most logical course of action is to transport me to safety with all due urgency!
Vila Restal: He's grovelling!
Del Tarrant: We're not going anywhere, Orac, until you give me straight answers...


"Blakes 7: Star One (#2.13)" (1979)
Orac: [about the minefield] A cursory examination of the relevant Star One systems indicates that this defense zone is one of a number of such zones located at strategic points on the rim of that section of the galaxy colonized by mankind.
Vila: Then they are expecting an invasion? A hoard of hairy aliens.
Orac: There is no logical reason why aliens should be hairy.
Vila: There's no logical reason why people should be hairy!

Orac: My preliminary examination of the defense zone indicates that it is made up of a network of satellite generators.
Vila: We could have told you that.
Orac: Each of which performs a dual function: namely, to indicate the approach of an intruder and then to destroy that intruder by a powerful anti-matter implosion.
Jenna: So it's a combined alarm system and minefield.
Orac: Correct. If I may continue.
Vila: He always makes me feel as if I should be taking notes.
Orac: [annoyed] *If* I may continue.


"Blakes 7: Weapon (#2.3)" (1979)
Olag Gan: [entering carrying Orac] Here we are. He wasn't very happy at being interrupted.
Roj Blake: I'll apologize later. Orac, your information on the Weapons Development Base is unsatisfactory.
Orac: Define "unsatisfactory".
Roj Blake: I was about to. Your strategic computations start from the premise that the base is on maximum security alert.
Orac: Computer communications traffic indicates that it is.
Jenna Stannis: Not permanently?
Orac: It is not a practice drill.
Cally: So what is it?
Orac: Clearly, some occurrence which is a real or apparent threat.
Jenna Stannis: Thank you, Orac. I'm sure we'd have never worked that out for ourselves.
Orac: It is therefore the case that security in the immediate future will be sensitive and alert.
Roj Blake: A fact to be included in strategic computations. Moral:
Kerr Avon: Never argue with a computer.
Roj Blake: Right.


"Blakes 7: Stardrive (#4.4)" (1981)
[after watching a tape of three Federation ships exploding]
Avon: Well, Orac, what do you think?
Orac: I think you have brought back a most fascinating recording.
Avon: We are looking for conclusions, not critical acclaim.


"Blakes 7: Sand (#4.9)" (1981)
Kerr Avon: Orac, teleport.
Orac: Teleport? I am not programmed. Three squared to the principal.
Dayna Mellanby: Oh, no.
Orac: I love you.
Vila Restal: Orac!
Orac: My emotions are deeper than the seas of space. One times one is only possible in the ultra-dimensional.
Kerr Avon: Turn Orac off.
Orac: [breathily] I love you.
Kerr Avon: [offended] *Off*!
Orac: We will be lovers for a little while, or maybe for a long while, who knows?
Soolin: I do.
[Soolin pulls Orac's key]
Vila Restal: What a thought.


"Blakes 7: Rumours of Death (#3.8)" (1980)
Del Tarrant: Is it done?
Avon: Yes, but it isn't finished.
Vila: Wonderful. Who's next on your list? Servalan?
Avon: [inserts key] Orac.
Orac: [annoyed] What is it *now*?
Avon: Gracious as ever. Orac, I want you to interrogate the Federation Security computers and get me Servalan's present location.
Vila: [astonished] I was *joking*, Avon!


"Blakes 7: Moloch (#3.11)" (1980)
Orac: If you cannot listen to the answers, why do you inconvenience me with questions?


"Blakes 7: Rescue (#4.1)" (1981)
Orac: I naturally took the opportunity to study all the systems on the Liberator. A few, a very few were of minor interest. I would not, however, number the teleport system amongst these.
Dorian: But you do know how it worked?
Orac: [testily] Of course I know how it worked.
Dorian: Then you will tell me. Now.
Orac: There seems little point in wasting time on such an explanation since you would be incapable of understanding it.
Dorian: [angry] Don't be insolent!
Orac: A statement of fact cannot be insolent. Besides, insolence implies an emotional relationship which does not and could not exist between us.


"Blakes 7: Traitor (#4.3)" (1981)
Orac: The art of leadership is delegation.