Mr. Knightley
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Quotes for
Mr. Knightley (Character)
from Emma (1996)

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Emma (1996)
Mr. Knightley: I rode through the rain! I'd - I'd ride through worse than that if I could just hear your voice telling me that I might, at least, have some chance to win you.

Mr. Knightley: Emma, you didn't ask me to contribute a riddle.
Emma Woodhouse: Your entire personality is a riddle, Mr. Knightley. I thought you overqualified.

Mr. Knightley: You must be happy that she settled so well.
Emma Woodhouse: Indeed! One matter of joy in this is that I made the match myself. People said Mr. Weston would never marry again, and what a triumph!
Mr. Knightley: Triumph? You made a lucky guess!
Emma Woodhouse: Have you never known the triumph of a lucky guess? Had I not promoted Mr. Weston's visits and given encouragement where encouragement was needed, we might not have had a wedding today.
Mr. Woodhouse: Then please, my dear, encourage no one else. Marriage is so disrupting to one's social circle.

Mr. Knightley: Marry me. Marry me, my wonderful, darling friend.

Emma: The most incomprehensible thing in the world to a man is a woman who rejects his offer of marriage.
Mr. Knightley: I do not comprehend it because it is madness.
[about Harriet's refusal of Robert Martin's offer of marriage]
Mr. Knightley: I hope you are wrong.
Emma: I could not be. I saw her answer.
Mr. Knightley: Emma
[looking at her suspiciously]
Mr. Knightley: ... you wrote her answer, didn't you?
Emma: If I did, I would have done no wrong. He is not Harriet's equal.
Mr. Knightley: I agree he is not her equal.
Emma: Good.
Mr. Knightley: He is her superior in sense and situation!

[Emma shoots a badly-aimed arrow]
Mr. Knightley: Try not to kill my dogs.

Mr. Knightley: Vanity working on a weak mind produces every kind of mischief.

Mr. Knightley: Better be without sense than misapply it as you do.

Mr. Knightley: Is it not a brother's job to find fault with his sister?

Emma Woodhouse: How fascinating that any discordancy between us must always arise from *my* being wrong.
Mr. Knightley: Not fascinating, but true.

Mr. Knightley: [about Emma's insult to Miss Bates] Badly done, Emma!

Emma: [worried that Mr. Knightley may be in love with Harriet Smith] Oh dear!
Mr. Knightley: What?
Emma: What? Oh...
[realizing her mistake]
Emma: Oh!
[uneasily]
Emma: Something about the deer we need for the... the... venison stew.

Mr. Knightley: Maybe it is our imperfections which make us so perfect for one another.

Mr. Knightley: I can think of nothing less appealing than an evening of watching other people dance. Go on!
[throwing stick for dog to fetch]
Emma Woodhouse: Then you shall have to dance yourself.
Mr. Knightley: I have no taste for it. I'd rather fetch that stick.
Emma Woodhouse: I'll try to remember to bring it to the ball.
Mr. Knightley: [pause] I just want to stay here where it's cozy.

Mr. Knightley: Men of sense, whatever you may say, do not want silly wives!

Mr. Knightley: Emma, how could you be so unfeeling to Miss Bates? How can you be so insolent to a woman of her age and situation? I had not thought it possible?
Emma: How could I help saying it? I daresay she did not understand me.
Mr. Knightley: Oh, I assure you, she felt your full meaning. She cannot stop mentioning it! I wish you could have heard her honour your forbearance in putting up with her when her society is so irksome.
Emma: I know there is no better creature in all the world, but you must allow that blended alongside of the good there is an equal among of ridiculous in her.
Mr. Knightley: Were she prosperous, or a woman equal to your age and situation, I would not quarrel with any liberties of manner. But she is poor! Even moreso than when she was born, and should she live to be an old lady, she will sink further still. Her situation being in every way below you should secure your compassion! Badly done, Emma. Badly done. She has watched you grow from a time when her notice of you was an honour to this, humbling her and laughing at her in front of people who would be guided by your treatment of her. It is not pleasant for me to say these things, but I must tell you the truth while I still can, proving myself your friend by the most faithful counsel, trusting that sometime you will do my faith in you greater justice that you do it now.

Mr. Knightley: Emma, how could you be so unfeeling to Miss Bates? How can you be so insolent to a woman of her age and situation? I had not thought it possible?
Emma: How could I help saying it? I daresay she did not understand me.
Mr. Knightley: Oh, I assure you, she felt your full meaning. She cannot stop mentioning it! I wish you could have heard her honor your forbearance in putting up with her when her society is so irksome.
Emma: I know there is no better creature in all the world, but you must allow that blended along side of the good there is an equal among of ridiculous in her.
Mr. Knightley: Were she prosperous, or a woman equal to your age and situation, I would not quarrel with any liberties of manner. But she is poor! Even more so than when she was born, and should she live to be an old lady, she will sink further still, her situation being in every way below you should secure your compassion! Badly done, Emma. Badly done. She has watched you grow from a time when her notice of you was an honor to this, humbling her and laughing at her in front of people who would be guided by your treatment of her. It is not pleasant for me to say these things, but I must tell you the truth while I still can, proving myself your friend by the most faithful counsel, trusting that some time you will do my faith in you greater justice that you do it now.

Mr. Knightley: The truest friend does not doubt... but hope.

Mr. Knightley: [Whilst standing in front of the enormous Donwell Abbey] I just want to stay here where it's cozy.


"Emma: Episode #1.4" (2009)
Emma: [as they are curled up together after confessing their love] I was talking to Harriet.
Mr. Knightley: Harriet? I do not mind what we talk of. We can talk of Harriet if we must.

Emma: We are old friends. I will hear anything you want about anyone. And I will tell you exactly what I think as your friend.
Mr. Knightley: I don't - Friends indeed. I do want you to be honest. So, tell me, have I no chance of succeeding?
[Emma looks up speechless]
Mr. Knightley: My dearest Emma, for that is what you always have been and you always will be, my most beloved Emma. I cannot make speeches. If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more, but you know what I am. I have lectured you and scolded you and you have born it as no other woman would have.
Emma: Can this be true?
Mr. Knightley: You'll get nothing but the truth from me. So tell me what you think.
Emma: [moves closer and cradles his head in her hands] I find I do not know what to think.

Isabella Knightley: I believe George is not well. He is listless, snappish.
Mr. Knightley: What?
Isabella Knightley: You are behaving strangely, not yourself. You did not wish to go to dinner with the Cavandishes. You did not want to take the boys to find frogs in the park.
John Knightley: Some might say that hesitation was a perfectly normal responce to both those invitations.

Mr. Knightley: How pleasant to be absent, but in the hearts of everyone.

Mr. Knightley: I was thinking how at home you looked. You might be mistress of this house.
Emma: Oh, I don't think so. Hartfield is enough for me. Think how much you would have to scold me if I was mistress of two domains!

Mr. Knightley: How pleasant to be absent, but in the thoughts of everyone.

Isabella Knightley: You know, I believe my father would worry. I believe George is not well. He is listless and snappish.
Mr. Knightley: What?
Isabella Knightley: You are behaving strangely, not yourself. You did not want to go to dinner with the Cavendishes, you did not wish to take the boys to find frogs in the park.
John Knightley: Some might say hesitation was a perfectly normal response to both of those invitations.

Emma: You speak as though you envied him.
Mr. Knightley: I do envy him, Emma. His secret is out at least. You will not ask me my secret? Yes, you are wise, but I cannot be. So, I must tell you.
Emma: No, please don't tell me! Take a little time. Take a little time to think of what you are going to say. For once said, it cannot be unsaid!
Mr. Knightley: I will obey you.

Emma: Wait, wait! Please stop. I am sorry. We are old friends. I will hear anything you want, about anyone. And I will tell you exactly what I think, as your friend.
Mr. Knightley: I don't... friends indeed! I do want you to be honest. So, tell me. Have I no chance of succeeding? My dearest Emma, for that is what you always have been, and you always will be. My most beloved Emma. I cannot make speeches. If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am. I have lectured you and scolded you and you have borne it as no other woman would have.
Emma: Can this be true?
Mr. Knightley: You'll get nothing but the truth from me. So tell me what you think.
Emma: I find... I do not know what to think.

Mr. Knightley: Maybe I have Frank Churchill to thank for making me first aware of being in love with you.

Mr. Knightley: I will move to Hartfield, for as long as necessary.
Emma: You would do that for me?
Mr. Knightley: I might walk back and forth a couple of times a day for my constitution. But I would do far more, without a second thought.


"Emma: Episode #1.1" (2009)
Mr. Knightley: [of Mr. Elton] That man is so full of himself it's a wonder he can stay on that horse.

Mr. Knightley: [about Mr. Elton] That man is so full of himself, I'm surprised that he can stay on that horse.

Mr. Knightley: That man is so full of himself, I'm surprised he can stay on that horse.

Mr. Knightley: I even thought of you. I thought, "Even Emma will think that this is a good match."
Emma: I cannot believe that you know so little of Emma as to say such a thing!

Mr. Knightley: It is better to be without wits than apply them as you do, Emma.
Emma: There! Don't you see how you add force to my argument: men don't like girls who argue.


"Emma: Episode #1.3" (2009)
Emma: [about Frank's absence] He has urgent business... He has gone to London... to have his haircut.
Mr. Knightley: His hair cut?
[Sarcastically]
Mr. Knightley: Of course imperative business indeed.

Emma: I was completely mistaken in Mr. Elton. There is a littleness about him which you saw and I did not. He always was a small man, made smaller by his wife! I was convinced he was in love with Harriet. How could I have been so stupid?
Mr. Knightley: I will do you the justice of saying that you would have chosen better for him than he did for himself. Miss Smith has some first-rate qualities, infinitely preferable to a sensible man than Mrs. Elton. I was surprised by our conversation.

Emma: We know how highly you think of Jane Fairfax.
Mr. Knightley: Anyone may know how highly I think of Miss Fairfax.
Emma: And yet, you may not be aware how highly. The extent of your admiration may take you by surprise one day.

Mr. Knightley: If you were to ask me, I would say that you were in need of a project.

Mr. Knightley: There is but one married woman in the world who I could ever allow to invite what guests she pleased to Donwell.
Mrs. Elton: Mrs. Weston, I suppose.
Mr. Knightley: No, Mrs. Knightley. And until she is in being, I will manage matters myself.


"Emma: Episode #1.2" (2009)
Mr. Knightley: [of Frank] He doesn't come here for 20 years and then disappears for a day.
Emma Woodhouse: He had important business.
[pause while Mr. Knightley looks at her quizzically]
Emma Woodhouse: He's gone to London to have his hair cut.
Mr. Knightley: His hair cut? Imperative business indeed.

Mr. Knightley: Well, I was your considerable superior in years when you were the age of little Emma here.
[gestures toward infant niece]
Emma: And I am sure that you were by far my superior in judgment when I was. But surely we have grown closer in judgment as the years have passed?
Mr. Knightley: Well, I had the advantage of not being a pretty woman and a spoiled child.

Emma: I think to set off like that, impulsively, recklessly even, to risk disobeying his aunt in order to do a duty to his father shows a fineness of spirit in Mr. Churchill, a keenness of feeling, a most romantic nature and a thoroughly good heart.
Mr. Knightley: It's the horse I'm sorry for!
Emma: For my part, it only makes my anticipation of meeting this young man even stronger. Any woman would respond to such heroic, gentlemanly impulses.
Mr. Knightley: I thought gentlemen always rode in carriages?

Mr. Knightley: He doesn't come here for 20 years and then he disappears for a day?
Emma: He has urgent business. He has gone to London to have his hair cut.
Mr. Knightley: His hair cut? Of course, imperative business indeed.


"Kraft Theatre: Emma (#8.9)" (1954)
Mr. Knightley: If I can't rescue Emma from herself I can rescue William from a bull.

Mr. Knightley: What did you expect but that he would fall in love with you?
[Scolding Emma for encouraging Mr. Elton by inviting him to so many social events]

Mr. Knightley: [Speaking of Harriet's engagement to William Larkins] I must admit that I had a hand in bringing them together.
Emma Woodhouse: [amused and feeling vindicated that even Knightley can play matchmaker] You mean you made the match yourself?
Mr. Knightley: Yes, yes. And it is a good thing, Emma. I believe that Harriet has always loved him and he's never stopped hoping that one day she'd accept him. And he's a good man, Emma.


Emma (1996) (TV)
Mr. Knightley: [Knightley speaks of Frank Churchill who will be going to London] To get his hair cut?


"Emma: Episode #1.2" (1960)
Frank Churchill: I'm very glad to know you, sir.
George Knightley: And I you. I remember you well as a boy.
[Emma and Weston drift a short way off]
Frank Churchill: I must confess, Mr. Knightley, I am so entranced by everything I find at Highbury that I feel sorry I ever had to leave.
George Knightley: Perhaps you will visit more frequently, now you find it agrees with you.
Frank Churchill: As frequently as I can, sir, though it is not always in my power. My aunt puts many difficulties in the way.
George Knightley: [Dryly] So I understand.
Frank Churchill: Well, what do you think of the situation, Mr. Knightley? I read in the papers that the government is expected to fall within the week. Do you expect it to?
George Knightley: I am not interested in politics, Mr. Churchill. They seem to be conducted by men generally too dishonest to lead a life of crime.
Frank Churchill: [Amused] I agree with you heartily. A gentleman has better pursuits. I passed Donwell Abbey on the way here and saw a very fine herd of cattle in your meadow. Do you use the new methods of breeding?
George Knightley: I have always found the old methods to work very well. Excuse me, sir. I must speak to Mrs. Weston.