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Quotes for
Yevgraf (Character)
from Doctor Zhivago (1965)

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Doctor Zhivago (1965)
Engineer: If they were to give me two more excavators, I'd be a year ahead of the plan by now.
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: You're an impatient generation.
Engineer: Weren't you?
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: Yes, we were, very. Oh, don't be so impatient, Comrade Engineer. We've come very far, very fast.
Engineer: Yes, I know that, Comrade General.
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: Yes, but do you know what it cost? There were children in those days who lived off human flesh. Did you know that?

[repeated line]
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: How did you come to be lost?

[last lines]
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: Tonya! Can you play the balalaika?
David: Can she play? She's an artist!
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: Who taught you?
David: Nobody taught her!
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: Ah... then it's a gift.

Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: I told myself it was beneath my dignity to arrest a man for pilfering firewood. But nothing ordered by the party is beneath the dignity of any man, and the party was right: One man desperate for a bit of fuel is pathetic. Five million people desperate for fuel will destroy a city. That was the first time I ever saw my brother. But I knew him. And I knew that I would disobey the party. Perhaps it was the tie of blood between us, but I doubt it. We were only half tied anyway, and bothers will betray a brother. Indeed, as a policeman, I would say, get hold of a man's brother and you're halfway home. Nor was it admiration for a better man than me. I did admire him, but I didn't think he was a better man. Besides, I've executed better men than me with a small pistol. I told them who I was: The old man was hostile, the girl cautious, my brother... seemed very pleased. I think the girl was only one who guessed at their position.

Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: [narrating; on World War I] By the second winter, the boots had worn out... but the line still held. Even Comrade Lenin underestimated both the anguish of that 900-mile long front... as well our own cursed capacity for suffering. Half the men went into action without any arms... irregular rations... led by officers they didn't trust.
Officer: [to soldiers] Come on, you bastards!
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: And those they did trust...
Pasha: [leaps out of the trench and begins leading his men in a charge] Come on, Comrades! Forward, comrades! Earth-shakers!
[an artillery shell explodes in front of him; he falls to the ground, and the soldiers retreat to their trench]
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: Finally, when they could stand it no longer, they began doing what every army dreams of doing...
[the soldiers begin to leave their trenches]
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: They began to go home. That was the beginning of the Revolution.

Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: [narrating over a military parade in Moscow] In bourgeois terms, it was a war between the Allies and Germany. In Bolshevik terms, it was a war between the Allied and German upper classes - and which of them won was of total indifference. My task was to organize defeat, so as to hasten the onset of revolution. I enlisted under the name of Petrov. The party looked to the peasant conscript soldiers - many of whom were wearing their first real pair of boots. When the boots had worn out, they'd be ready to listen. When the time came, I was able to take three whole battalions out of the front lines with me - the best day's work I ever did. But for now, there was nothing to be done. There were too many volunteers. Most of it was mere hysteria.

Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: A nameless number on a list that was lost, or mislaid. That was common in those days.