Margot Wendice
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Quotes for
Margot Wendice (Character)
from Dial M for Murder (1954)

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Dial M for Murder (1954)
Tony Wendice: How do you go about writing a detective story?
Mark Halliday: Well, you forget detection and concentrate on crime. Crime's the thing. And then you imagine you're going to steal something or murder somebody.
Tony Wendice: Oh, is that how you do it? It's interesting.
Mark Halliday: Yes, I usually put myself in the criminal's shoes and then I keep asking myself, uh, what do I do next?
Margot Mary Wendice: Do you really believe in the perfect murder?
Mark Halliday: Mmm, yes, absolutely. On paper, that is. And I think I could, uh, plan one better than most people; but I doubt if I could carry it out.
Tony Wendice: Oh? Why not?
Mark Halliday: Well, because in stories things usually turn out the way the author wants them to; and in real life they don't... always.
Tony Wendice: Hmm.
Mark Halliday: No, I'm afraid my murders would be something like my bridge: I'd make some stupid mistake and never realize it until I found everybody was looking at me.

Margot Mary Wendice: How long have you known this?
Chief Insp. Hubbard: Did you suspect it yourself?
Margot Mary Wendice: No, never. And yet... What's the matter with me, Mark? I don't seem able to feel anything.

[first lines]
Margot Mary Wendice: let me get you another drink. Mark, before Tony comes I ought to explain something.
Mark Halliday: Yes, I've been waiting for that.
Margot Mary Wendice: I haven't told him anything about us.

Margot Mary Wendice: Oh, there you are. We thought you were never coming. What have you been up to?
Tony Wendice: I'm sorry darling, but the boss came in just as I was leaving.
Margot Mary Wendice: Tony, this is Mark Halliday.
Tony Wendice: Hello Mark.
Mark Halliday: Hello.

Tony Wendice: How about coming with me to a stag party?
Mark Halliday: A stag party?
Tony Wendice: Yes, some American boys have been playing tennis all over the country. We're giving them a sort of farewell dinner.
Mark Halliday: Sounds great, but I'm not much of a tennis player.
Tony Wendice: Doesn't matter. You know New York and all that.
[to Margot]
Tony Wendice: Darling, Mark's coming to the party tomorrow night.
Margot Mary Wendice: Oh good. You better drop in here first and have a drink.
Tony Wendice: That's the idea.
Mark Halliday: Yes, alright. Well I'll try and get a taxi.
Margot Mary Wendice: No, we can usually pick one up. So long, darling.
Tony Wendice: Enjoy yourself.
Mark Halliday: So long, Tony.
Tony Wendice: Good night.

Margot Mary Wendice: Don't make me stay home. You know how I hate doing nothing.
Tony Wendice: Doing nothing? Why there are hundreds of things you can do. Have you written to Peggy, thanking her for the weekend? And what about those clippings? It's an ideal opportunity.
Margot Mary Wendice: Well I like that. You two go gallivanting while I stay home and do those boring clippings.

[last lines]
Tony Wendice: As you said Mark, it might work out on paper, but congratulations, Inspector. Oh, by the way... How about you, Margot?
Margot Mary Wendice: Yes, I could do with something.
Tony Wendice: Mark?
Mark Halliday: So could I.
Tony Wendice: I suppose you're still on duty, Inspector.

Margot Mary Wendice: Anyone would have realized he was dead. Just one look at those staring eyes...
Chief Insp. Hubbard: So you did see his face, after all.
Margot Mary Wendice: I saw his eyes! I can't remember his face!

Chief Insp. Hubbard: There is evidence however that he was blackmailing you.
Tony Wendice: Blackmail?
Mark Halliday: Yes, I'm afraid it's true, Tony.
Chief Insp. Hubbard: And you suggest that he came in by the window. And we know that he came in by that door.
Margot Mary Wendice: But he can't have come in that way. That door was locked. And there are only two keys. My husband had his with him, and mine was in my handbag. Here.
Chief Insp. Hubbard: You could have let him in.

Margot Mary Wendice: Why did you bring me here?
Chief Insp. Hubbard: Because you were the only other person who could possibly have left that key outside. I had to find out if you knew it was there.
Margot Mary Wendice: Suppose I had known?
Chief Insp. Hubbard: You didn't.