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Quotes for
Bottom (Character)
from A Midsummer Night's Dream (1999)

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A Midsummer Night's Dream (1999)
Tom Snout: [Puck has turned Bottom into a donkey] Bottom, thou art changed. What do I see on thee?
Bottom the Weaver: What do you see? What; do you see an ass' head of your own, do you?
Peter Quince: [backing away] Bless me. Thou art translated.
[all run off, leaving Bottom alone on the stage]
Bottom the Weaver: Why do they run away? I see their knavery. This is to make an ass of me.

Bottom the Weaver: I have had a most rare vision / I have had a dream / Past the wit of man to say what dream it was. / Man is but an ass if he go about to expound this dream. / Methought I was... / There's no man can tell what. / Methought I was... / Methought I had... / Man is but a patched fool if he will offer to say what I had.

Bottom the Weaver: The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen; Man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report what my dream was.

Bottom the Weaver: Since lion vile hath here deflowered my dear...
Peter Quince: DEVOURED.

Bottom the Weaver: Hark! I see a voice!


A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935)
Bottom: I have had a most rare vision. I have had a dream; past the wit of man to say what dream it was. Methought I was - -man is but an ass if he go about to expound this dream. Methought I was - -and methought I had - -man is but a patched fool if he will offer to say
[chuckling]
Bottom: what methought I was and what methought I had.
[breaks into uncontrollable laughter and suddenly brays like a jackass]

Quince, the Carpenter: Nick Bottom, you are set down for... Pyramus.
Bottom: I play Pyramus! I play Pyramus! I play Pyramus!... What is Pyramus?

Quince, the Carpenter: Come, sit down, every mother's son, and rehearse your parts. And we will do it in action as we will do it before the duke. Pyramus, you begin.
Bottom: Well, I begin. Oh, Thisny!
Quince, the Carpenter: And when you have spoken your speech...
Bottom: Then I stop.
Quince, the Carpenter: No, no.
Bottom: Well, then I go on.
Quince, the Carpenter: No, no! Then you enter into that brake; and so everyone according to his cue. Thisby! Stand forth. Speak, Pyramus.
Bottom: Oh, Thisny, the flowers -...
Quince, the Carpenter: "Oh, Thisby."
Bottom: This-nee.
Quince, the Carpenter: This-bee!
Bottom: Nay!
Quince, the Carpenter: Ay!
Bottom: Nay!
Quince, the Carpenter: Ay!
Bottom: This
[he pulls his copy of the script from his waist]
Bottom: ... This
[he reads the scroll and scowls]
Bottom: ... This... neebay. "The flowers of odious - -"
Quince, the Carpenter: Odorous, odorous!
Bottom: Odorous, odorous. The flowers odi - - the flowers odorous savors sweet. "Oh, Thisby, the flowers of odorous savors sweet; so have thy breath...
[He gets a whiff of Flute's breath and recoils]
Bottom: Oh, Thisby, my dearest Thisby dear. But hark!"
[Flute erupts into a coughing fit. Bottom throws down his scroll, storms off, and is led back by Quince. He points accusatively at Flute]
Bottom: Thisny!
Quince, the Carpenter: [handing back Bottom's scroll] Thisby.
Bottom: "But hark, a voice! Stay you but here a while, and by and by I will to you appear."
[He exits the wrong way]
Quince, the Carpenter: Into that brake!

Bottom: To say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays.


"ShakespeaRe-Told: A Midsummer Night's Dream (#1.4)" (2005)
Titania: What's your name?
Bottom: Bottom. But you can call me Booty.

Bottom: And what do they call you?
Titania: Titania
Bottom: [looking down at her breasts] I'm not surprised.


The Merry Maids of Madness (2016)
Nick Bottom: my humblest apologies, good madam. I saw the alabaster form of this fine maiden and mistook her for a unicorn and like Orion I was drawn to the thrill of the hunt.


A Midsummer Night's Dream (1968)
Bottom: Reason and love keep little company together nowadays.