Mrs. Bennet
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Quotes for
Mrs. Bennet (Character)
from Pride and Prejudice (1940)

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Pride & Prejudice (2005)
[from trailer]
Mrs. Bennet: Is he amiable?

Mrs. Bennet: Oh, my goodness. Everybody behave naturally.

Mrs. Bennet: Have you no consideration for my poor nerves?
Mr. Bennet: You mistake me, my dear. I have the utmost respect for your nerves. They've been my constant companion these twenty years.

Mr. Bennet: Well, if Jane does die, it will be a comfort to know she was in pursuit of Mr. Bingley.
Mrs. Bennet: People do not *die* of colds.
Elizabeth Bennet: Though she may well perish with the shame of having such a mother.

Mrs. Bennet: But she doesn't like him. I thought she didn't like him.
Jane Bennet: So did I, so did we all. We must have been wrong.
Mrs. Bennet: Wouldn't be the first time, will it?
Jane Bennet: No, nor the last I dare say.

Mrs. Bennet: Have you no consideration for my nerves?
Mr. Bennet: You mistake me, my dear. I have the utmost respect for your nerves. They've been my constant companion these twenty years.

Elizabeth Bennet: [On Marriage] Is that really all you think about?
Mrs. Bennet: When you have five daughters, Lizzie, tell me what else will occupy your thoughts, and then perhaps you will understand.

Mrs. Bennet: Do you not want to know who has taken it?
Mr. Bennet: As you wish to tell me, my dear, I doubt I have any choice in the matter.

[ordered to order Lizzie to accept Mr. Collins's proposal]
Mr. Bennet: Your mother insists on you marrying Mr. Collins...
Mrs. Bennet: Yes! Or I'll never see her again!
Mr. Bennet: Well, Lizzy, from this day henceforth it seems you must be a stranger to one of your parents...
Mrs. Bennet: Who will maintain you when your father's gone?
Mr. Bennet: Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins... and I will never see you again if you do.
Mrs. Bennet: Mr. Bennet!
Elizabeth Bennet: Thank you, Papa.

Mrs. Bennet: ...and then he danced the third with Miss Lucas.
Mr. Bennet: We were all there, dear.
Mrs. Bennet: Oh, poor thing. It is a shame she's not more handsome. There's a spinster in the making and no mistake. The fourth with a Miss King, of little standing... and the fifth again with Jane.
Mr. Bennet: If he'd had any compassion for me, he would have sprained his ankle in the first set.

Mr. Collins: Mrs. Bennet I was hoping, if it would not trouble you, that I might solicit a private audience with Miss Elizabeth in the course of the morning.
Mrs. Bennet: Oh, yes. Certainly. Lizzy will be very happy indeed. Everyone, out. Mr. Collins would like a private audience with your sister.
Elizabeth Bennet: No, no, wait, please. I beg you. Mr. Collins can have nothing to say to me that anybody need not hear.
Mrs. Bennet: No nonsense, Lizzy. I desire you will stay where you are. Everyone else to the drawing room. Mr. Bennet?
Mr. Bennet: But...
Mrs. Bennet: Now.

Mrs. Bennet: Now she'll have to stay the night. Exactly as I predicted.
Mr. Bennet: Good grief, woman. Your skills in the art of matchmaking are positively occult.
[Mrs. Bennet giggles]
Elizabeth Bennet: Though I don't think, Mama, you can reasonably take credit for making it rain.

Mrs. Bennet: You must visit him at once.

Mrs. Bennet: Netherfield Park is let at last. Have you heard who has taken it?
Mr. Bennet: I have.

[first lines]
Elizabeth Bennet: [to frolicking sisters] Lydia! Kitty!
Mrs. Bennet: My dear Mr Bennet, have you heard? Netherfield Park is let at last. Do you not want to know who has taken it?
Mr. Bennet: As you wish to tell me, my dear, I doubt I have any choice in the matter.

Mr. Bennet: How can that possibly affect them?
Mrs. Bennet: Oh Mr. Bennet, how can you be so tiresome? You know he must marry one of them!
Mr. Bennet: Ah, so that is his desire in settling here.
Mrs. Bennet: You must go and visit him at once!
Mr. Bennet: Good heavens. People.
Mrs. Bennet: For we may not visit if you do not, as you well know, Mr. Bennet!

Mr. Bennet: There's no need. I already have.
Mrs. Bennet: Have? Oh Mr Bennet! How can you tease me so? Have you no compassion for my poor nerves?
Mr. Bennet: Oh you mistake me, my dear. I have the highest respect for them. They've been my constant companion these twenty years.

Kitty Bennet: Papa!
Mrs. Bennet: Is he amiable?
Mary Bennet: Who?
Kitty Bennet: Is he handsome?
Mary Bennet: Who?
Lydia Bennet: He's sure to be handsome.
Elizabeth Bennet: For five thousand a year, it would not matter if he's got warts and a leer.
Mary Bennet: Who's got warts?
Mr. Bennet: I'll give my heartiest consent to his marrying whichever of the girls he chooses.
Lydia Bennet: So will he come to the ball tomorrow, Papa?
Mr. Bennet: I believe so.

Mrs. Bennet: Mr. Bennet, you must introduce him to the girls! Immediately!

Sir William Lucas: Mr. Bingley, my eldest daughter you know. Mrs. Bennet, Miss Jane Bennet, Elizabeth, and Miss Mary Bennet.
Mrs. Bennet: It is a pleasure. I have two others, but they are already dancing.
Mr. Bingley: I'm delighted to make your acquaintance.
Sir William Lucas: And may I introduce Mr. Darcy of Pemberley and Derbyshire.

Lydia Bennet: Oh, Mama! You will never, ever, ever believe what we're about to tell you!
Mrs. Bennet: Well tell me quickly, my love!
Lydia Bennet, Kitty Bennet: [in unison] The regiment are coming!
Mrs. Bennet: Officers!

Mrs. Bennet: Jane is a splendid dancer, is she not?

Mr. Bingley: Your friend, Miss Lucas, is a most amusing young woman.
Elizabeth Bennet: Oh, yes, I adore her!
Mrs. Bennet: It is a pity she's not more handsome.
Elizabeth Bennet: Mama!
Mrs. Bennet: Oh, but Lizzie would never admit that she's plain. Of course, it's my Jane that's considered the beauty of the county.
Jane Bennet: No, Mama, please...
Mrs. Bennet: When she was only fifteen there was a gentleman that was so much in love with her that I was sure he would make her an offer. However, he did write us some very pretty verses.

Mrs. Bennet: Oh, Mr. Bennet, the way you carry on, anyone would think our girls look forward to a grand inheritance. When you die, Mr. Bennet, which may in fact be very soon, our girls will be left without a roof to their head nor a penny to their name.
Elizabeth Bennet: Oh, Mama, please. It's ten in the morning.


"Pride and Prejudice: Episode #1.1" (1995)
Miss Bingley: And now the mother! Are we to be invaded by every Bennet in the country? Oh, too much to be borne.
Mr. Hurst: Oh, lord!
[the door opens and Mrs. Bennet, Lizzy, Kitty and Lydia enter]
Mr. Bingley: Mrs. Bennet, you are very welcome.
[He and Darcy bow]
Mr. Bingley: I hope you do not find Miss Bennet worse than you expected.
Mrs. Bennet: Indeed I do, sir. She is very ill indeed, and suffers a vast deal...
[Lizzy looks down, mortified; Bingley looks worried]
Mrs. Bennet: ...though with the greatest patience in the world, for she has the sweetest temper, Mr. Bingley. But she is a great deal too ill to be moved.
[Bingley's sisters, off to the side, look furious at this imposition]
Mrs. Bennet: We must trespass, a little longer, on your kindness.
Mr. Bingley: But of course.
Miss Bingley: Miss Bennet will receive every possible attention, ma'am, I assure you.
Mrs. Bennet: You are very good.
[She laughs, and then immediately dismisses the matter of Jane's health]
Mrs. Bennet: Well, you have a sweet room here! I think you will never want to leave Netherfield, now you are come here.
Mr. Bingley: I believe I should be happy to live in the country forever! Wouldn't you, Darcy?
Mr. Darcy: You would? You don't find the society somewhat confined and unvarying for your taste?
Mrs. Bennet: "Confined and unvarying?" Indeed, it is not, sir! The country is a vast deal pleasanter than town, whatever *you* may say about it!
[Darcy turns his back and walks over to look out the window. Lizzy feels humiliated]
Elizabeth Bennet: Mama, you mistake Mr. Darcy's meaning.
Mrs. Bennet: Do I? Do I? He seems to think the country nothing at all!
Elizabeth Bennet: Mama!
Mrs. Bennet: "Confined!" "Unvarying!" I would have him know we dine with four-and-twenty families!
[the Bingley sisters try unsuccessfully to contain their sniggers; Bingley looks at them in anger and distress]

Mrs. Bennet: [Discussing Darcy] He slighted poor Lizzy you know, flatly refused to stand up with her.
Mr. Bennet: Slighted my Lizzy, did he?
Elizabeth Bennet: I didn't care for him either, father, so it's of little matter.

Mrs. Bennet: From Netherfield? Oh, Jane, well, what does it say?
Jane Bennet: It's from Miss Bingley.
Mrs. Bennet: Oh, well, that is a good sign, too. Give it to me! - My dear friend... there now... dine with Louisa and me today... la-di-da, la-di-da, la-di-da... as the gentlemen are to dine with the officers. - Oh, that's unlucky! Still you must go and make what you can out of it. - Yours ever, Caroline Bingley. - Very elegant hand.
Jane Bennet: May I have the carriage, father?
Mrs. Bennet: The carriage? No indeed! You must go on horseback for it looks like rain. Then you will have to stay the night!
Jane Bennet: Mother!
Mrs. Bennet: Oh, why do you look at me like that? Would you go all the way to Netherfield and back without seeing Mr. Bingley? No indeed. - You will go on Nellie, that will do very well, indeed.

Mrs. Bennet: You have no compassion for my poor nerves.

Elizabeth Bennet: For a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.
Mrs. Bennet: Yes, he must indeed! And who better than one of our five girls?
Lydia Bennet: What a fine joke if he were to choose me!
Kitty Bennet: Or me!
[Lydia and Kitty laugh]
Jane Bennet: [Reprimanding] Lydia!

Mrs. Bennet: Did you ever meet such a proud, disagreeable man?
Elizabeth Bennet: The very rich can afford to give offense wherever they go. We need not care for his good opinion.
Mrs. Bennet: No, indeed.
Elizabeth Bennet: Perhaps he is not so handsome after all...?
Mrs. Bennet: Indeed not. Quite ill-favored.

Mrs. Bennet: Oh, Mr. Bennet, nothing you say shall ever vex me again.
Mr. Bennet: I'm sorry to hear it.


Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (2016)
Mrs. Bennet: [trying to be complimentary] Lady, may I take a moment to compliment you on your pantaloons. Your eyepatch. Fashion or function?
Lady Catherine de Bourgh: Function.

Mr. Bennet: [cunningly] An unhappy alternative is before you. Your mother will never speak to you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins. And I will never speak to you again if you do.
Mrs. Bennet: [realizing, outraged] Who will maintain you when your father is dead? No one, Elizabeth Bennet! You shall become a poor and pathetic spinster!
Elizabeth Bennet: [near tears] Anything! Anything is to be preferred or endured rather than marrying without affection!

Mrs. Bennet: I consider dancing to be the first refinement of polished society. Don't you agree, Mr. Darcy?
Mr. Darcy: No, every savage can dance. Why, I imagine that even zombies can do it to some degree of success.

Parson Collins: Is there absolutely no negotiation over Jane?
Mrs. Bennet: The early bird catches the worm, Mr. Collins.
Parson Collins: Indeed.
Mr. Bennet: Be mindful of your talent for the delicate compliments, sir.

Mrs. Bennet: Do not worry, Mr. Collins, she shall be brought to reason.
Parson Collins: Oh good!
Elizabeth Bennet: No.
Parson Collins: Oh no.


Pride and Prejudice (1940)
Lydia Bennet: Has anybody heard how Jane is this morning?
Mrs. Bennet: Eh, Mr. Bingley sent a note over by his groom. She's much better. Such a happy idea of mine sending her off in the rain.
Mr. Bennet: Yes, but to Jane must go all the credit for having caught the cold, my dear.

Mrs. Bennet: Look at them! Five of them without dowries. What's to become of them?
Mr. Bennet: Yes, what's to become of the wretched creatures? Perhaps we should have drowned some of them at birth.

Mrs. Bennet: Mary, try to sparkle a little.
[Mary grins horribly]
Mrs. Bennet: Just a little!


"Pride and Prejudice: Episode #1.6" (1995)
[Mr. Bingley is coming to visit Longbourn for the first time in a year, and Mrs. Bennet is rushing about the room, ordering the girls how to behave]
Mrs. Bennet: Oh, sit up straight, Jane! Pull your shoulders back! A man could go a long way without seeing a figure like yours, if you could only make the most of it!

[Bingley has determined to go ask Jane to marry him]
Mr. Bingley: [to a manservant] Bring me my horse! At once! Quick, man!
[the music rises into a suspenseful allegro-crescendo as we watch Bingley ride towards Longbourn, and the women of Longbourn getting the news and preparing for him... ]
Mr. Bingley: [Mrs. Bennet is still in her night-clothes as she runs to Jane's room and cries out in panic:]
Mrs. Bennet: Jane! Jane! Oh, my dear Jane!
[She bursts into Jane's room. Jane is on the edge of her bed, in a white dress, slipping on some slippers]
Jane Bennet: Oh, what is the matter?
Mrs. Bennet: He is come! He is come!
Jane Bennet: [Bewildered] Who is come?
Mrs. Bennet: Mr. Bingley, of course! Make haste, make haste, hurry down! Oh gracious, you're not all dressed!
[Calling for the housekeeper:]
Mrs. Bennet: Hill! Hill! Oh, where is Hill?
[Mrs. Bennet runs through the halls of the house. She bursts into Lizzy's room, where the maid Sarah is doing Lizzy's hair]
Mrs. Bennet: Never mind, Sarah. You must come to Miss Bennet this moment. Come along, girl, and help her up with her gown, never mind Miss Lizzy's hair!
Kitty Bennet: Mama, mama! Where is my new locket that Lydia brought me from London? Mary, have you seen my new locket?
Mary Bennet: I shouldn't know it if I did see it. I care nothing for such baubles.
Mrs. Bennet: Oh, never mind your locket, girl! Jane, steady yourself. He is here, he is here!
Jane Bennet: Mama, Lizzy and I will be down as soon as we can. Send Kitty down, she is forwarder than any of us.
Mrs. Bennet: Oh, hang Kitty! What is she to do with it?
[Kitty stamps her foot and turns away, crying]
Mrs. Bennet: Jane, where is your muslin dress, dear? Oh, Hill, Hill! Where is Hill?
[Cut to sudden silence from the frantic music, as we see Bingley and the young ladies seated in the parlor; they are all extremely awkward and shy]


"Lost in Austen: Episode #1.1" (2008)
Mrs. Bennet: It vexes me exceptionally that Elizabeth should choose to be abroad at such a time as this. And Hammersmith, Mr. Bennet? Is Hammersmith a likely sort of place?
Mr. Bennet: I was not aware that it *was* abroad, my dear, but I salute your superior command of geography.

Mrs. Bennet: [shrieks] Jane has gone to Netherfield Park in this weather and Miss Price pursues her. Are you so obtuse, Mr. Bennet, that you do not see what is the matter here? She has gone to queer Jane's pitch!
Mr. Bennet: It is exciting when you bring the language of the theatre into this house, my dear, but might this room be returned to the purpose for which it was created? For me to sleep in - undisturbed.


"Pride and Prejudice: Episode #1.5" (1995)
Mrs. Bennet: I blame those Forsters. There must have been some great neglect on their part, for she is not the sort of girl to do this sort of thing if she had been properly looked after.

Mrs. Bennet: Oh, fetch my smelling salts, I feel my faintness coming on me again.


"Lost in Austen: Episode #1.4" (2008)
Lady Catherine de Bourgh: [haughtily] I shall say what I have to say, and then I shall leave immediately. First, I made it pellucidly clear to you, Mrs. Bennet, over my salt, that I considered the brothers Collins an excellent match for your daughters. Yet you have done nothing to promote the cause. On the contrary, you have abandoned them to a house run by criminally incompetent servants. Well, what do you have to say for yourself?
[stunned silence]
Mrs. Bennet: I say this. You are a prig, madam, a pander and a common bully. And you cheat at cards. Do you suppose you may enter my house and brandish your hat at me thus? I have a mind to turn you upside down and use you to scrape out Ambrosia's sty.
Lady Catherine de Bourgh: [coldly] Madam, I take my leave of you.
Mrs. Bennet: Do! Or I shall take you out and set to scraping.
[Jane and Amanda try to stop themselves giggling]
Mrs. Bennet: Scrape, scrape, scrape I shall go!
Mr. Bennet: Tally ho, wife!
Mr Collins: Mrs. Bennet, you must desist.
Jane Bennet: Oh, be quiet, you silly man. Do you suppose Mama would permit her daughters to be married to your brothers, when before her very eyes is the specimen of you?
Amanda Price: Mrs. Bennet, that was... bloody marvellous.
Mrs. Bennet: [modestly] It *was* refreshing.

Lady Catherine de Bourgh: Well? What do you have to say for yourself?
Mrs. Bennet: I say this: You are a prig, Madam. A pander. And a common bully. And you cheat at cards! Do you suppose you may enter my house and brandish your hat at me thus? I have a mind to turn you upside down and use you to scrape out Ambrosia's sty.
Lady Catherine de Bourgh: Madam, I take my leave of you.
Mrs. Bennet: Do! Or I shall take you out and set to scraping! Scrape, scrape, scrape, I shall go!
Mr. Bennet: Tally-ho, wife!
Mr. Collins: Mrs. Bennet, you must desist!
Jane Bennet: Oh be quiet, you silly man. Do you suppose Mama would permit her daughters to be married to your brothers when before her very eyes is the specimen of you?


"Pride and Prejudice: Episode #1.4" (1995)
Kitty Bennet: I heard that Mrs. Foster is to go sea-bathing.
Lydia Bennet: I would love to go sea-bathing.
Mrs. Bennet: A little sea-bathing would set me up for ever.
Mr. Bennet: And yet I am unmoved.


"Lost in Austen: Episode #1.3" (2008)
Mrs. Bennet: Are you not happy that Jane is wed to Mr. Collins?
Mr. Bennet: Happy? That my kindest, prettiest daughter has embarked upon an adulthood of suffication to such a preening Caliban? Happy, Madam - that she should live in subjugation to such an enormity? I would rather sleep in a drain than consent to be happy!