Mr. Bennet
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Biography for
Mr. Bennet (Character)
from "Pride and Prejudice" (1995)

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Mr. Bennet is the father of Elizabeth Bennet and is the head of the Bennet family.

His first name is never mentioned, however in ITV's Lost in Austen he introduces himself as Claude Bennet.

An English gentleman with an estate in Hertfordshire, he is married to Mrs. Bennet and has five daughters. Unfortunately, his property is entailed to the male line, so his estate will be inherited by a distant cousin, Mr. Collins.

Mr. Bennett appears apathetic and resigned to his marital state, which is unhappy. In a time when females could not work to provide for themselves, Mr. Bennett falls short in securing a financial future for his wife and daughters.

Mr Bennet thinks his three daughters, Mary, Kitty and Lydia, are silly.

He is closest to his daughter Elizabeth but is also attached to his eldest daughter, Jane, both having won this approval by possessing a greater amount of sense than their three sisters.

He was fond of the country and of books; and from these tastes had arisen his principal enjoyments.

Mr. Bennet habitually retreated to his library after breakfast and stayed there most of the day, emerging only for dinner and tea.

Mr. Bennet prefers the solitude of his study, neglecting the raising of his children, which leads to near-disaster.

Mr. Bennet was said to be "captivated by youth and beauty" and what it can give, and married on that. Later, Mrs Bennet's "weak understanding and illiberal mind" put and end to all his real affections for her.

Mr Bennet is said to be "so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humor, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three-and-twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character."

Page last updated by kittykat304, 3 years ago
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