Willy Armitage
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Quotes for
Willy Armitage (Character)
from "Mission: Impossible" (1966)

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"Mission: Impossible: The Code (#4.1)" (1969)
[Jim Phelps, Willie, and Paris are admiring Barney's latest device, a sort of traveling drill; Paris is holding a Nine of Diamonds card up to its camera]
James Phelps: Great, Barney.
Barney Collier: There'll be no transmission problems, Jim, because the Presidential Mansion has its own television transmitter. We'll simply piggyback onto the parabolic antenna and get a strong signal.
James Phelps: Mm-hm. Now, their normal method of sending coded messages is by transatlantic cable, but for extra security precautions, the invasion plans are being delivered by a courier from the UPR. He'll arrive at three o'clock.
Willy Armitage: Will it just be in code form?
James Phelps: No, no, it'll be treated the same as the other messages. It's a unique process where the code is hidden by a photographic overlay. Some kind of chemical spray is placed between the code and the photograph allowing them to be joined together, and another spray separates them once the message has been transmitted.
Barney Collier: Once the courier's photograph gets into the communications room and is removed, the code's only visible for a few seconds.
James Phelps: That'll be long enough.

[Jim and Willy have only a few minutes to solve the code, which appears as an enormous block of five-lettered groupings]
James Phelps: The photograph.
Willy Armitage: What?
James Phelps: Well, there has to be a key to the grouping variations somewhere. We know that it's not in that message itself, but it could be on the photograph that the code was transmitted on. Run the tape back.

Willy Armitage: I don't see a legible number anywhere in the picture.
James Phelps: I don't, either, but it's gotta be in there somewhere... The clock. In the tower of the building in the foreground. 2:33. Well, there can't be too many variations. It could be that every second word of every third line of every third group is transposed.
[Jim types this possibility into a special decoding keypad. He tears off the resulting printout]
James Phelps: Nope. Maybe every second line.


"Mission: Impossible: Terror (#4.20)" (1970)
[last lines]
James Phelps: Where is the real nitro?
Willy Armitage: It's all right. I got rid of it in the aqueduct.


"Mission: Impossible: Image (#6.17)" (1972)
[last lines]
Emil Gadsen: What, what is this? What's happening?
Willy Armitage: [to waiting police men] Officers.


"Mission: Impossible: The Council: Part 2 (#2.12)" (1967)
[last lines]
Willy Armitage: Let's get out of here.


"Mission: Impossible: The Psychic (#1.28)" (1967)
[last lines]
Cinnamon Carter: The stockholders of Lowell's investment funds will be glad to get these back.
Byron Miller: You don't think they'll mind that the game was fixed?
Willy Armitage: That's right. What if Lowell comes back to the United States and presses charges?
Barney Collier: He could, you know. After serving 99 years or so for embezzlement.
Rollin Hand: We'll worry about it then, okay?


"Mission: Impossible: The Carriers (#1.10)" (1966)
Daniel Briggs: We did get an agent of ours in there once.
Cinnamon Carter: Did he say anything about getting out?
Daniel Briggs: As a matter of fact, he didn't.
Willy Armitage: Why not?
Daniel Briggs: He never got out.


"Mission: Impossible: Double Dead (#6.20)" (1972)
[last lines]
Willy Armitage: You're going to be all right, Penyo.


"Mission: Impossible: The Innocent (#5.3)" (1970)
[first lines]
Barney Collier: The computer's on the other side of this wall, Willie. We'll have to move these.
Willy Armitage: Right.


"Mission: Impossible: The Astrologer (#2.13)" (1967)
[last lines]
Willy Armitage: Will he be all right?
Cinnamon Carter: He'll be all right in a few minutes.
James Phelps: Did you get the microfilm?


"Mission: Impossible: The Fighter (#7.18)" (1973)
[last lines]
James Phelps: So, your father's agreed to turn state's evidence, Susan. He's already told the Attorney General enough to rip open the whole Syndicate infiltration of the fight business.
Susan Mitchell: But he'll still have to go to prison?
Barney Collier: Yes. He'll have to serve some time.
Lisa Casey: But I think it'll make it a lot easier on him, Susan, if he could see you.
Willy Armitage: We've arranged for you to meet with him, if you want to.
Susan Mitchell: Of course... and I'll wait.
Pete Novick: No. We'll wait.


"Mission: Impossible: Bag Woman (#6.19)" (1972)
[last lines]
Willy Armitage: How you feel?
Barney Collier: Feeling fine.


"Mission: Impossible: Underground (#7.7)" (1972)
[last lines]
Arnold Lutz: I'm off the hook.
James Phelps: Not quite.
[Jim sees Clavering and Takis sneaking up behind him in a mirror and ducks just before they shoot]
Willy Armitage: [to Clavering and Takis] Hold it!


"Mission: Impossible: The Numbers Game (#4.2)" (1969)
[the team, including a Dr. Ziegler, are planning their strategy]
James Phelps: Dr. Ziegler?
Dr. Ziegler: I have arranged that by tomorrow, General Gollan will have what appears to be a severe case of pneumonia.
James Phelps: That should make both Eva Gollan and Major Denesch, the General's aide, happy. They both want the General's wealth to fulfill their personal ambitions. And right now, Eva has the upper hand. But her actions are gonna be highly unpredictable.
Willy Armitage: I'll keep her busy, but, uh, what about Denesch?
James Phelps: He'll be watching her closely, Willy. Now, once you give her the phony bank numbers, she'll leave the Schloss, then he'll follow her.
Tracey: How will we know we have the right number, Jim?
James Phelps: The General doesn't trust his memory, Tracey. So he's put the bank number onto a computer. Only he knows how to operate it.
Paris: How much time do we have, Jim?
James Phelps: Uh, the General's lawyer's due to arrive at the bank in Zurich at about 3:30. That means that we have to send the correct number by three o'clock, to give them time to empty his vault.
Paris: Can we break Gollan by three?
James Phelps: Yes... If we can make him believe that you'll kill me and save him.


"Mission: Impossible: The Confession (#1.22)" (1967)
[last lines]
Willy Armitage: You're not a bad actor, Rollin.
Rollin Hand: How were the ratings?
Barney Collier: It was on the entire network.
Cinnamon Carter: 40 or 50 million viewers.
Daniel Briggs: I'd say that Townsend and McMillan are suffering from overexposure.


"Mission: Impossible: The Deal (#7.3)" (1972)
[last lines]
James Phelps: You all right?
Willy Armitage: I'm fine. Did you get the key?
Barney Collier: Five million dollars. Rogan, Larson, and the end of General Hammond.


"Mission: Impossible: The Diamond (#1.19)" (1967)
Willy Armitage: [after swapping out the diamond] Can't tell this one from the fake.
Barney Collier: No, not if you don't look too closely.


"Mission: Impossible: The Condemned (#2.19)" (1968)
James Phelps: The only thing at stake here is one man's life. He happens to be a friend of mine. We'll be improvising all along the way, according to what...
Barney Collier: Jim, we're wasting time.
James Phelps: Now, understand, Barney. This could be as dangerous as anything I've ever put you through.
Willy Armitage: Jim, I...
James Phelps: No, Willy, let me finish, please. The problem is purely personal. It's mine. None of you has to get involved at all.
Barney Collier: Are you finished now?
James Phelps: Yes.
Rollin Hand: Good. Jim, not often, but sometimes, you talk too much.


"Mission: Impossible: A Game of Chess (#2.17)" (1968)
[last lines]
Rollin Hand: All right, let's go. We've got a date with the underground.
Willy Armitage: You're right.


"Mission: Impossible: TOD-5 (#7.5)" (1972)
[last lines]
Willy Armitage: You're looking real good, Mimi.
Barney Collier: How's the shoulder today?
Mimi Davis: Fine. Pain's all gone. Getting out tomorrow.
James Phelps: I think you're a lot happier about getting well than Gordon Holt was.