Commander William T. Riker
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"Star Trek: The Next Generation: A Matter of Honor (#2.8)" (1989)
Tactics Officer: [about the two female Klingons on board the Pagh] They are inquisitive. They would like to know how you would endure.
Commander William T. Riker: Endure what?
Lt. Klag: Them.
Commander William T. Riker: [looks at the women] One or both?

[Picard and Riker are discussing the possibility of sending a Starfleet officer on temporary assignment on a Klingon vessel]
Commander William T. Riker: I wouldn't mind the assignment, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Any particular reason?
Commander William T. Riker: Because nobody's ever done it before.

Commander William T. Riker: It's been my understanding that one of the duties of the first officer of the Klingon vessel is to assassinate his captain?
Lieutenant Worf: Yes, sir.
Commander William T. Riker: Wouldn't that bring about chaos?
Lieutenant Worf: Of course not. See, when and if the captain becomes weak or unable to perform, it is expected that his honorable retirement should be assisted by his First. Your second officer will assassinate you for the same reasons.

Commander William T. Riker: It is different.
Lieutenant Worf: Many things will be different.

[Riker is caught off guard when offered with a dish of live gagh]
Lt. Klag: Would you like something easier?
Commander William T. Riker: Easier?
Lt. Klag: Yes. If Klingon food is too strong for you, perhaps we could get one of the females to... breast-feed you.

Doctor Pulaski: I've never heard of a Klingon starving to death on his own vessel, but you might.
Commander William T. Riker: Not if I weaken first.
Doctor Pulaski: I know all about that. Their beliefs are rather brutal, but usually, what kills us kills them.
Commander William T. Riker: Well, that's certainly good to know.

Commander William T. Riker: [presenting himself to Captain Kargan] Commander William Riker of the Starship Enterprise.
Captain Kargan: That is incorrect.
Commander William T. Riker: I don't understand.
Captain Kargan: You are Commander William Riker, First Officer of the Klingon cruiser the Pagh.

Captain Kargan: Exactly where are your loyalties, Commander?
Commander William T. Riker: I'm afraid I still don't understand, sir.
Captain Kargan: This ship is equipped with our best weapons and our finest warriors. Although we're on a peaceful mission, we're ready to go into battle instantly. I know I can count on every Klingon warrior in this crew to serve and die in that battle. So I ask you again, Commander Riker: where are your loyalties?

[Captain Kargan has demanded from Riker to reveal the secrets of the Enterprise to him, which Riker refuses]
Commander William T. Riker: I will obey your orders. I will serve this ship as First Officer. And in an attack against the Enterprise, I will die with this crew. But I will not break my oath of loyalty to Starfleet.
Captain Kargan: If you had told those secrets about the Enterprise, I would have labeled you a traitor and killed you where you stood. But instead you will die with us. You'll die like a Klingon.

[after questioning Riker's status as his commanding officer, Lieutenant Klag gets a thrashing from the former]
Commander William T. Riker: My oath is between Captain Kargan and myself. Your only concern is with how you obey my orders. Or do you prefer the rank of prisoner to that of lieutenant?
Lt. Klag: [subdued] I will take your orders.

Commander William T. Riker: After this tour, I may have some worthy questions.
Lt. Klag: Questions about what? About our future? Our future is honor. Our present is serving this ship.

Lt. Klag: My father was captured in battle by Romulans and not allowed to die. He eventually escaped.
Commander William T. Riker: Where is he now?
Lt. Klag: He is on our planet. He waits.
[Riker looks quizzically at the Tactics Officer]
Tactics Officer: He waits for his death.
Lt. Klag: He will eventually fade of a natural illness and die, weakened and useless. Honorless. I will not see him.
Commander William T. Riker: He's your father!
Lt. Klag: A Klingon is his work, not his family. That is the way of things.

Lt. Klag: Klingons do not express feeling the way you do.
Commander William T. Riker: Perhaps you should.
Lt. Klag: We would not know how.
Commander William T. Riker: Yesterday I did not know how to eat gagh.
[he takes a mouthful of that dish]

[Captain Kargan intends to attack the Enterprise]
Commander William T. Riker: I recommend you don't fire until you're within 40,000 kilometers.
Lt. Klag: Why?
Commander William T. Riker: It will cut down their response time.
Lt. Klag: You are honoring your promise to serve us?
Commander William T. Riker: Would you do less?

[Riker has returned from the Pagh]
Commander William T. Riker: That might've been one of the shortest assignments in the history of Starfleet.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Wrong, Number One. It was almost the longest. Well done.
Commander William T. Riker: Thank you. Actually, I learned quite a bit.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [referring to Riker's battered face] Apparently not when to duck.
Commander William T. Riker: When *not* to duck would be more accurate.

[last lines]
Commander William T. Riker: You come from a very brave and unique people. I'm glad you're with us on the Enterprise.
Lieutenant Worf: Thank you, Commander. And... welcome home.

Captain Kargan: You should have killed me.
Commander William T. Riker: I don't want your command.
Captain Kargan: But you tricked me to get it.
Commander William T. Riker: Either way you can have it back.
Captain Kargan: ...Then return to your station.
[Riker glances a Klag and stays where he is. Kargan hits him. Klag checks on Riker]
Captain Kargan: Get him off my ship!
Lt. Klag: Yes, Captain.
[to Riker]
Lt. Klag: You understand the Klingons better than I thought, Commander.
Commander William T. Riker: Thank you, my friend.


Star Trek: First Contact (1996)
Cmdr. William Riker: We finished our first sensor sweep of the neutral zone.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, fascinating. Twenty particles of space dust per cubic meter, 52 ultraviolet radiation spikes, and a class-2 comet. Well, this is certainly worthy of our attention.
Cmdr. William Riker: Captain, why are we out here chasing comets?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Let's just say Starfleet has every confidence with the Enterprise and her crew - they're just not sure about her Captain. They believe that a man who was once captured and assimilated by the Borg should not be put in a situation where he would face them again. To do so would introduce "an unstable element to a critical situation."
Cmdr. William Riker: That's ridiculous. Your experience with the Borg makes you the perfect man to lead this fight.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Admiral Hayes disagrees.

Cmdr. Deanna Troi: If you're looking for my professional opinion as ship's counselor: he's nuts.
Cmdr. William Riker: I'll be sure to note that in my log.

Dr. Zefram Cochrane: A group of cybernetic creatures from the future have traveled back through time to enslave the human race... and you're here to stop them?
Cmdr. William Riker: That's right.
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Hot damn! You're heroic.

[Troi is drunk]
Cmdr. Deanna Troi: I'm just trying to blend in!
Cmdr. William Riker: You're blended all right.

Cmdr. William Riker: Mr. Worf, you do remember how to fire phasers?

Lt. Commander Worf: The Defiant?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Adrift but salvageable.
Cmdr. William Riker: Tough little ship.
Lt. Commander Worf: Little?

[Riker, LaForge and Cochrane have made humanity's first warp speed test flight]
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Is that Earth?
Lieutenant Commander Geordi La Forge: That's it!
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: It's so small...
Cmdr. William Riker: It's about to get a whole lot bigger.

Lieutenant Commander Geordi La Forge: Look, Doc, we can't do this without you!
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: I don't care. I don't want to be a statue.
Cmdr. William Riker: Doctor...
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: You stay away from me!
[runs off]
Cmdr. William Riker: We don't have time for this.
[pulls out a phaser and stuns Cochrane who falls in a creekbed]
Cmdr. William Riker: [to Geordi] You told him about the statue?

Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Now this, Dena...
Deanna Troi: Deanna.
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: [as he pours Deanna a drink] ... is the good stuff.
Cmdr. William Riker: Dr. Cochrane...
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: To the Phoenix... may she rest in peace.
[both drink, then choke]
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Oohh... Okay, that wasn't so good.
[tosses bottle away]

Cmdr. William Riker: Deanna! Deanna!
Cmdr. Deanna Troi: Will, don't turn off the that...!
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Who is this jerk? And who told him he could turn off my music?
Cmdr. Deanna Troi: Will Riker, Zefram Cochrane.
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Is he a friend of yours?
Cmdr. Deanna Troi: Yes.
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Husband?
Cmdr. Deanna Troi: No.
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Goood.

Cmdr. William Riker: [looking up at the moon] Wow! Look at that!
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Don't tell me you've never seen the moon before.
Cmdr. William Riker: It's just looks a lot different, that's all. There are 50 million people living on the moon in my time.

Cmdr. William Riker: Doctor, tomorrow morning when they detect the warp signature from your ship and realize that humans have discovered how to travel faster than light, they decide to alter their course and make first contact with Earth, right here.
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Here?
Lieutenant Commander Geordi La Forge: Well, actually, over there.
Cmdr. William Riker: It is one of the pivotal moments in human history, Doctor. You get to make first contact with an alien race! And after you do... everything begins to change.
Lieutenant Commander Geordi La Forge: Your theories on warp drive allow fleets of starships to be built and mankind to start exploring the Galaxy.
Cmdr. Deanna Troi: It unites humanity in a way no one ever thought possible. When they realize they're not alone in the universe, poverty, disease, war - they'll all be gone within the next fifty years.
Cmdr. William Riker: But unless you make that warp flight tomorrow morning before eleven fifteen, none of it will happen.
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: And you people, you're all astronauts on... some kind of star trek.

Dr. Zefram Cochrane: Please! Don't tell me it's all thanks to me! I've heard enough about the great Zefram Cochrane! I don't know who writes your history books or where you get your information from, but you people got some pretty funny ideas about me!
[smirks]
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: You all look at me as if I'm some kind of... saint, or visionary or something!
Cmdr. William Riker: I don't think you're a saint, Doc. But you did have a vision. And now we're sitting in it.
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: You wanna know what my vision is? Dollar signs, money! I didn't build this ship to usher in a new era for humanity. You think I wanna see the stars? I don't even like to fly! I take trains! I built this ship so I could retire to some tropical island... filled with
[smirks]
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: naked women. THAT'S Zefram Cochrane. THAT'S his vision. This other guy you keep talking about, this historical figure? I never met him. I can't imagine I ever will.
Cmdr. William Riker: Someone once said "Don't try to be a great man. Just be a man, and let history make its own judgements."
Dr. Zefram Cochrane: That's rhetorical nonsense. Who said that?
Cmdr. William Riker: [smiles at Cochrane] You did, ten years from now.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Best of Both Worlds: Part 2 (#4.1)" (1990)
Captain William T. Riker: We're no longer just fighting the Borg. We're fighting the life experience they've stolen from Captain Picard. Now, how the hell do we defeat an enemy that knows us better than we know ourselves?

Lt. Cmdr. Elizabeth Paula Shelby: Captain Riker, based on our past relationship, there's no reason for me to expect to become your first officer, except that you need me. I know how to get things done, and I have the expertise in the Borg.
Captain William T. Riker: And you have a lot to learn, Commander.
Lt. Cmdr. Elizabeth Paula Shelby: Yes, sir.
Captain William T. Riker: Almost as much as I had to learn when I came on board as Captain Picard's first officer. A fact he reminded me of when I commented on what a pain in the neck you are.

Guinan: When a man is convinced he's going to die tomorrow, he'll probably find a way to make it happen. The only one who can turn this around is you.
Captain William T. Riker: I'll do the best I can.
Guinan: You're gonna have to do something you don't want to do. You have to let go of Picard.

Guinan: Did he ever tell you why we're so close?
Captain William T. Riker: No.
Guinan: Oh... Then let me just say that... our relationship is beyond friendship, beyond family. And I *will* let him go. And you must do the same. There can only be one Captain.
Captain William T. Riker: It's not that simple. This was his crew. He wrote the book on this ship.
Guinan: If the Borg know everything he knows, it's time to throw that book away. You *must* let him go, Riker. It's the only way to beat him. The only way to save him.

Locutus: We will proceed to Earth, and if you attempt to intervene, we will destroy you.
Captain William T. Riker: Then take your best shot, Locutus, 'cause we are about to intervene.

[Dr. Crusher has suggested introducing a destructive breed of nanites into the Borg]
Captain William T. Riker: How long would it take to execute that?
Doctor Beverly Crusher: That's the problem. Two to three weeks.
Counselor Deanna Troi: In two or three weeks, nanites may be all that's left of the Federation.

Captain William T. Riker: [to Picard's empty chair] What would you do?

Captain William T. Riker: I'm sure Captain Picard would have something meaningful and inspirational to say right now. To tell you the truth, I wish he was here, 'cause I'd like to hear it, too. I know how difficult this transition has been for all of you. I can take over for him; but I could never replace Captain Picard, nor would I ever try. Whatever the outcome, I'm sure our efforts in the coming battle will justify his faith in all of us.

Captain William T. Riker: Commander, we don't have to like each other to work well together. As a matter of fact, I'd like you to continue to keep me on my toes.
Lt. Cmdr. Elizabeth Paula Shelby: Some might define that as the role of a first officer.
Captain William T. Riker: Damn! You *are* ambitious, aren't you, Shelby?

[the Borg have abruptly ceased their attack on the Enterprise]
Captain William T. Riker: Mr. Data, what the hell happened?
Lt. Commander Data: I successfully planted a command into the Borg collective consciousness. It misdirected them to believe it was time to regenerate. In effect, I put them all to sleep.
Captain William T. Riker: [baffled] To sleep?

Captain William T. Riker: Commander Shelby, take an away team and confirm that the Borg are... asleep.
Commander Shelby: Delighted, sir.

Captain William T. Riker: How much do you remember?
Jean-Luc Picard: Everything. Including some brilliantly unorthodox strategy from... a former first officer of mine.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: 11001001 (#1.14)" (1988)
Commander William T. Riker: A blind man teaching an android how to paint? That's gotta be worth a couple of pages in somebody's book.

Commander William T. Riker: What's a knockout like you doing in a computer-generated gin joint like this?

[Worf and a few other officers are about to play parrises squares]
Lieutenant Worf: Rest assured, Commander, we will be victorious, at whatever the cost.
Commander William T. Riker: Worf, it's just a game, a friendly little competition. You work up a sweat, you have a few laughs, and you make new friends.
Lieutenant Worf: If winning is not important, then, Commander - why keep score?

Lieutenant Tasha Yar: Believe it or not, Worf is developing a sense of humor.
Commander William T. Riker: I hope so, for their sake.

Commander William T. Riker: What's your name? Tell me you love jazz.
Minuet: My name is Minuet, and I love all jazz, except Dixieland.
Commander William T. Riker: Why not Dixieland?
Minuet: You can't dance to it.
Commander William T. Riker: My girl!

Commander William T. Riker: [about the Bynars] For them there are only two choices, one or zero - yes or no.

Commander William T. Riker: [after seeing the holo-character Minuet for the first time] Gentlemen - if this is what you call 'enhancement', you've got a gift for understatement.

Commander William T. Riker: I could develop feelings for Minuet. Exactly as I would for any woman.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Doesn't love always begin that way? With the illusion more real than the woman?

Commander William T. Riker: How far can this relationship go? I mean, how real are you?
Minuet: As real as you need me to be.

Commander William T. Riker: Too real!
Bass Player: You got that straight, Slim. Too real is too right.

Commander William T. Riker: Blondes and jazz seldom go together.

[last lines]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: You know, Number One - some relationships just can't work.
Commander William T. Riker: Yes - probably true. She'll be difficult to forget.


"Star Trek: Enterprise: These Are the Voyages... (#4.22)" (2005)
Commander T'Pol (hologram): Captain, Admiral Douglas is asking you to approve the decommission protocols.
Capt. Jonathan Archer (hologr.): One thing at a time. After the charter's signed, I'll give him whatever he needs to put Enterprise in mothballs.
Comm Voice: All senior staff, report to the bridge.
Commander William T. Riker: Computer, freeze program. Save from this time index.
Enterprise-D Computer: Program saved.
Commander William T. Riker: End program.

[at the suggestion of Counselor Troi, Commander Riker has tried to get some insights on his present situation by calling up an "historic holoprogram"]
Counselor Deanna Troi: Have you learned anything on the holodeck about breaking orders?
Commander William T. Riker: Not yet. I've gone back a couple of days earlier to get a perspective. But I really don't see how this is gonna help.
Counselor Deanna Troi: That's why you run a starship, and I'm a counselor.

Commander William T. Riker: [on Archer's ready room] Our brig is bigger than this.
Counselor Deanna Troi: A lot of things change in 200 years.

Commander William T. Riker: No fish tank.
Counselor Deanna Troi: How could Archer survive without a fish tank?

Counselor Deanna Troi: [of Archer] He's cute.
Commander William T. Riker: Don't get any ideas.

Cmdr. C. 'Trip' Tucker (hologr.): I can count on one hand the number of people I trust. I don't mean trust like... 'I trust you aren't lying to me' or, 'I trust you won't steal my money'. I'm talking about the kind of trust where... you know someone's not gonna hurt you, no matter what; where you know they'll always be there for you, no matter how bad things get. You ever know anybody like that?
Commander William T. Riker: [as Chef] Yeah. One or two.

[Riker, posing as Chef, has asked T'Pol about Trip]
Commander T'Pol (hologram): If you're referring to our intimate relationship, that's been over for six years.
Commander William T. Riker: But the question remains, do you miss him?
Commander T'Pol (hologram): I'm Vulcan. I don't miss people.

Commander William T. Riker: [as Chef] Did Trip ever take a swing at Picard?
Ensign T. Mayweather (hologr.): At who?
Commander William T. Riker: Archer, Captain Archer?

Commander William T. Riker: [as Chef, about Trip] So, did he follow your orders?
Dr. Phlox (hologram): Didn't have a choice.
Commander William T. Riker: You've always got a choice.

Commander T'Pol (hologram): Before I joined this crew, I never could have imagined anything more important than following orders.
Commander William T. Riker: [as Chef] And now?
Commander T'Pol (hologram): Humans believe that sometimes... you have to follow your instincts. Very illogical approach, but one I've come to embrace.

Counselor Deanna Troi: [referring to Archer] Is he nervous?
Commander William T. Riker: Wouldn't you be?
Counselor Deanna Troi: Oh, he'll be fine. I had to memorize this speech in grammar school. You wish you could tell them all that this alliance'll give birth to the Federation.
Commander William T. Riker: I think I'm ready to talk to Captain Picard. I should've done it a long time ago.
Counselor Deanna Troi: So, I guess we're through here.
Commander William T. Riker: I guess we are. Computer... end program.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Best of Both Worlds: Part 1 (#3.26)" (1990)
[after an attempt to rescue Picard has failed]
Commander William T. Riker: The Captain?
Lt. Commander Data: We were unable to retrieve him, sir. The Captain has been altered by the Borg.
Commander William T. Riker: Altered?
Lieutenant Worf: He IS a Borg.

[Shelby gets early on site without permission]
Lt. Cmdr Elizabeth Paula Shelby: Morning. Early bird gets the worm, eh? We've had some interesting results.
Commander William T. Riker: Commander Shelby... Walk with me, Commander.
Lt. Commander Data: [to La Forge] Early bird...? I believe Commander Shelby erred. There is no evidence of avifaunal or crawling vermicular life forms on Jouret IV.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: That's not what she meant, Data. But you're right. She erred.

Lt. Cmdr Elizabeth Paula Shelby: Tell me, Commander, is serving aboard the Enterprise as extraordinary an experience as I've heard?
Commander William T. Riker: Every bit.
Lt. Cmdr Elizabeth Paula Shelby: Good. Because I intend to convince Captain Picard that I'm the right choice for the job.
Commander William T. Riker: Job? Which job?
Lt. Cmdr Elizabeth Paula Shelby: Yours, of course.

Commander William T. Riker: You disagree with me, fine. You need to take it to the Captain, fine - through me. You do an end run around me again, I'll snap you back so hard you'll think you're a first-year cadet again.
Lt. Cmdr Elizabeth Paula Shelby: May I speak frankly, sir?
Commander William T. Riker: By all means.
Lt. Cmdr Elizabeth Paula Shelby: You're in my way.
Commander William T. Riker: Really? How terrible for you!
Lt. Cmdr Elizabeth Paula Shelby: All you know how to do is play it safe. I suppose that's why someone like you sits in the shadow of a great man for as long as you have, passing up one command after another.

Capt. Picard: What's your impression of Shelby?
Commander William T. Riker: She knows her stuff.
Capt. Picard: She has your full confidence?
Commander William T. Riker: Well, I think she needs supervision. She takes the initiative a little too easily, sometimes with risks.
Capt. Picard: [tuts] Sounds like a young Lieutenant Commander I recruited as a first officer.
Commander William T. Riker: Perhaps.

[Picard talks to Riker about taking the post as captain of another ship]
Commander William T. Riker: With all due respect, sir - you need me. Particularly now.
Capt. Picard: Indeed. Starfleet needs good captains, particularly now.

Commander William T. Riker: [on reasons why he has declined the command of another starship] Maybe I'm just afraid of the big chair.

Commander William T. Riker: [in command of the Enterprise] Make it so.

[after the Borg have abducted Picard]
Lieutenant Worf: Sir, the coordinates they have set - they're on a direct course to sector 001. The Terran system.
Commander William T. Riker: Earth.

[last lines of season 3]
Commander William T. Riker: Mister Worf - fire!

Commander William T. Riker: [the Borg want Captain Picard] What the hell do they want with you?
Lt. Cmdr Elizabeth Paula Shelby: I thought they weren't interested in human life forms. Only our technology.
Capt. Picard: That priority seems to have changed.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Encounter at Farpoint (#1.1)" (1987)
[Riker's first line]
Commander William T. Riker: Personal log, Commander William Riker, stardate 41153.7 - The USS Hood has dropped me off at Farpoint Station, where I await the arrival of the new USS Enterprise, to which I have been assigned as First Officer. Meanwhile, I have been asked to visit the Farpoint administrator's office in the old city.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: One further thing - special favor.
Commander William T. Riker: Anything, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Using the same strength you showed with Captain DeSoto, I would appreciate it if you could keep me from making an ass of myself with children.
Commander William T. Riker: Sir?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I'm not a family man, Riker. And yet, Starfleet has given me a ship with children aboard.
Commander William T. Riker: Yes, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: And I, er... I don't feel comfortable with children. But since a captain needs an image of genealogy, you're to see that's what I project.
Commander William T. Riker: Aye, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Welcome to the Enterprise, Commander Riker.

[Picard has introduced Riker and Troi to each other]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Have the two of you met before?
Commander William T. Riker: We have, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Excellent. I consider it important for my key officers to know each other's abilities.
Counselor Deanna Troi: We do, sir. We do.

Commander William T. Riker: Do you consider yourself superior to us?
Lt. Commander Data: I am superior, sir, in many ways. But I would gladly give it up to be human.
Commander William T. Riker: Nice to meet you... Pinocchio.

Lt. Commander Data: Sorry, sir. I seem to be commenting on everything.
Commander William T. Riker: Good. Don't stop, my friend.

Commander William T. Riker: What do we do now, Captain? With their monitoring our every move and every word?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: We do exactly what we'd do if this Q never existed. If we're going to be damned, let's be damned for what we really are.

Commander William T. Riker: Captain, if he's not open to evidence in our favor, where will you go from there?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I'll attend to my duty.
Commander William T. Riker: To the bitter end?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I see nothing so bitter about that.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Isn't it a little presumptuous of a first officer to second-guess his captain's judgment?
Commander William T. Riker: Permission to speak candidly, sir?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Always.
Commander William T. Riker: Having been a first officer yourself, you know that assuming that responsibility must, by definition, include the safety of the captain. I have no problem with following any rules you lay down, short of compromising your safety.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: And you don't intend to back off from that position?
Commander William T. Riker: No, sir.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Would you object to your Captain ordering a clearly illegal kidnapping?
Commander William T. Riker: No objection, sir.

Commander William T. Riker: [referring to Picard] He calls that a little adventure?

[last lines]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Some problem, Riker?
Commander William T. Riker: Just hoping this isn't the usual way our missions will go, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, no, Number One. I'm sure most will be much more interesting. - Let's see what's out there. Engage!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Conundrum (#5.14)" (1992)
[after being hit by an energy wave, everybody on the Enterprise appears to have lost their memories]
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: Looks like we're all in the same boat.
Commander William T. Riker: Make that the same starship.

Commander William T. Riker: [about Riker] He's athletically inclined, loves to climb mountains; he's from somewhere called Alaska, enjoys exotic food... and takes his vacations on a planet called Risa.

Commander William T. Riker: [explaining Troi's visit in his quarters] We were just discussing the situation we're all in.
Ensign Ro Laren: Hm... good. Because I have a feeling that I used to be the jealous type.

Ensign Ro Laren: So, if everything were back to the way it was supposed to be, what do you think you'd be doing right now?
Commander William T. Riker: I'd be having more fun than searching the ship, I'd imagine.
Ensign Ro Laren: [surprised] Fun?
Commander William T. Riker: Well, with that holodeck we just saw. I think I could conjure up an interesting program or two.
Ensign Ro Laren: Now, that's disappointing.
Commander William T. Riker: Why?
Ensign Ro Laren: You don't strike me as a man who needs a holodeck to have a good time.

Commander William T. Riker: The rules on this ship do not change just because Ro Laren decides they do!

Ensign Ro Laren: For all we know, you and I could be married.
Commander William T. Riker: For all we know, you and I could hate each other.

[Ro has paid Riker a surprise visit in his quarters]
Ensign Ro Laren: I just didn't like the way my quarters were decorated.
Commander William T. Riker: Maybe we should switch quarters.
Ensign Ro Laren: Maybe we should stay right here and see what happens.
Commander William T. Riker: What if I snore in my sleep?
Ensign Ro Laren: What makes you think you're gonna get any sleep?

Counselor Deanna Troi: Nothing feels right. This room, this ship... most of all this war we're fighting.
Commander William T. Riker: I don't imagine war ever feels right.
Counselor Deanna Troi: I suppose that's true.

["Mac Duff" has been revealed as a Satarran bent on annihilating the Lysians]
Commander William T. Riker: With all the power that MacDuff had, to alter our brain chemistry and manipulate the computers, it's hard to believe he needed the Enterprise.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: The Satarran weapons technology was no more advanced than the Lysian. One photon torpedo would have ended their war.
Commander William T. Riker: It almost did.

[last lines]
[after the crew's memories have been restored, Riker and Ensign Ro have to come to terms with their recent fling]
Ensign Ro Laren: The Counselor tells me that at times like that, we might do the things that we've always wanted to do.
Commander William T. Riker: She said that?
Counselor Deanna Troi: It's psychologically valid.
Ensign Ro Laren: Commander, don't worry about it. As far as I'm concerned, you and I have shared something that we will treasure forever.
[gets up and leaves]
Commander William T. Riker: [flustered] Well... I'm a little confused.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Well, if you're still confused tomorrow, you know where my office is.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Peak Performance (#2.21)" (1989)
Commander William T. Riker: [more than two days before the start of a battle simulation] Do you care to surrender now, Captain?

Commander William T. Riker: You're outmanned, you're outgunned, you're outequipped. What else have you got?
Lieutenant Worf: Guile.

Commander William T. Riker: Just remember, Enterprise - Captain Riker's never lost.

[Riker has challenged Kolrami to a game of Strategema]
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: So, you're gonna beat him, huh?
Commander William T. Riker: No.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Well, then it's gonna be a close one?
Commander William T. Riker: No.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: But you have got a chance?
Commander William T. Riker: Naah!
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Are you even gonna bother to show up?
Commander William T. Riker: Sure. Kolrami is the best ever at Strategema. Just to get to play him is a privilege.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: So, aside from your being privileged, is there anything else I can look forward to?
Commander William T. Riker: Nope.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: [lame] This is gonna be exciting.

Lieutenant Worf: I have wagered heavily in the ship's pool that you will take him past the sixth plateau.
Commander William T. Riker: And if I don't?
Lieutenant Worf: I will be... irritated.

Commander William T. Riker: What's the Zakdornian word for 'mismatch'?
Sirna Kolrami: Challenge.

Commander William T. Riker: [to Picard] We're all here, waiting for you to pull another rabbit out of your hat.

Commander William T. Riker: Nobody said life was safe.

Commander William T. Riker: What is that?
Wesley Crusher: My experiment from the Enterprise.
Commander William T. Riker: Wes.
Wesley Crusher: It deals with high-energy plasma reactions with antimatter.
Commander William T. Riker: You went back to the Enterprise for that? Wes, you cheated.
Wesley Crusher: No, sir. You told me to improvise.

Commander William T. Riker: The simulation begins in one hour.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: You'll have warp drive, Captain, though it may not be what you expected.
Commander William T. Riker: I think that deserves some kind of explanation.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: We'll have warp 1 for about...
Wesley Crusher: Just under two seconds.
Commander William T. Riker: That's not long enough for an escape, but used as a surprise, it may give us a strategic advantage.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Sir, all of this is theoretical.
Commander William T. Riker: And if your theory fails to pay off?
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Have you ever driven a Grenthemen water hopper?
Commander William T. Riker: Sure.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Ever popped the clutch?
Commander William T. Riker: You're saying we're gonna stall the Hathaway?
Wesley Crusher: And the Enterprise will waltz right over and pulverize us.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Future Imperfect (#4.8)" (1990)
[Riker has given a rather mediocre performance on his trombone at his birthday party]
Counselor Deanna Troi: [after Riker has blown out the candles on his cake] So, what did you wish for, Will?
Commander William T. Riker: Music lessons!

Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: I'm running a level 1 diagnostic.
Commander William T. Riker: For thirty hours? It would never take you more than four. You're incapable of that level of incompetence, Mr. La Forge!

"Ambassador" Jean-Luc Picard: Captain - perhaps it would be best if we discussed this...
Commander William T. Riker: Shut up!
"Ambassador" Jean-Luc Picard: I beg your pardon?
Commander William T. Riker: I said 'shut up'. As in 'close your mouth and stop talking'!

Commander William T. Riker: [about his alleged wife] What was she like?
Counselor Deanna Troi: Min was... beautiful - of course - strong, intelligent, patient...
Commander William T. Riker: Well, she was married to me. She had to be patient.

Commander William T. Riker: 'Min'... Minuet!

Commander William T. Riker: Deanna, back off!

Commander William T. Riker: Well - would anyone else like to speak up? Or shall we end this charade?
Commander Tomalak: As you wish, Commander Riker. The charade is over.

Barash: My name is Barash.
Commander William T. Riker: To me, you'll always be Jean-Luc.

Commander William T. Riker: [Riker has uncovered Barash's deception for a second time] Who are you? What's your part in all this?

Commander William T. Riker: [Riker doubts Admiral Picard's assurances that Tomalak is serious about peace with the Federation] You yourself have said it's always a chess game with the Romulans. Move - countermove, guile and deceit.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Hide and Q (#1.9)" (1987)
Commander William T. Riker: We don't have time for these games.
Q: Games? Did someone say "game"? And perchance for interest's sake, a deadly game? To the game!

Commander William T. Riker: But it won't be boring. If Q is anything, he's imaginative.

Q: You seem to find this all very amusing.
Commander William T. Riker: I might - if we weren't on our way to help some suffering and dying humans, who...
Q: [dismissively] Ah, your species is always suffering and dying.

Commander William T. Riker: Geordi, can you see Worf?
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: I'd see the freckles on his nose if he had them, sir.

[Q has offered Riker to become part of the Q]
Commander William T. Riker: To become a part of you? I don't even like you.
Q: You're gonna miss me!

Commander William T. Riker: No one has ever offered to turn me into a god before.

[Riker has proposed to fulfill his friends' deepest desires]
Commander William T. Riker: Data...
Lt. Commander Data: No! No, sir.
Commander William T. Riker: But it's what you've always wanted, Data - to become human.
Lt. Commander Data: Yes, sir, that is true. But I never wanted to compound one... illusion with another. It might be real to Q. Perhaps even you, sir. But it would never be so to me. Was it not one of the Captain's favorite authors who wrote "This above all, to thine own self be true"? Sorry, Commander. I must decline.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Perhaps they're all remembering that old saying "Power corrupts".
Commander William T. Riker: And absolute power corrupts absolutely. Do you believe I haven't thought of that, Jean-Luc?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: And have you noticed how you and I are now on a first name basis?

Commander William T. Riker: I feel like such an idiot.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Quite right. So you should.

[Riker is demonstrating the abilities bestowed upon him by Q]
Commander William T. Riker: [to Geordi] And you, my friend, I know what you want.
[with a wave of his hand, Riker restores Geordi's eyesight]
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: [seeing Tasha for the first time] You're as beautiful as I imagined. And more.
Commander William T. Riker: Then we can throw away the VISOR?
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: I don't think so, sir.
[Geordi glances at Q]
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: The price is a little too high for me. And I don't like who I'd have to thank.
[Geordi takes his VISOR back and sits down]
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Make me the way I was.
[pleadingly]
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Please!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Pegasus (#7.12)" (1994)
Admiral Eric Pressman: So, how long have you had that beard?
Commander William T. Riker: About four years. I got tired of hearing how young I looked.
Admiral Eric Pressman: What was it that, uh... Lieutenant Boylen used to call you?
Commander William T. Riker: Ensign Babyface!

Admiral Eric Pressman: You *have* changed.
Commander William T. Riker: Changed?
Admiral Eric Pressman: Just something the Captain and I were talking about. To be honest, I'm glad to see this kind of change in you, Will. State your opinion and stand by it. It's a far cry from the young man who used to sit at my helm and worry about pressing the wrong button.
Commander William T. Riker: A lot of things can change in twelve years, Admiral.
Admiral Eric Pressman: Yes, they can. But it's important that a man changes the right things in his life. Not his sense of duty, not his sense of loyalty.
Commander William T. Riker: I'd like to think that I haven't changed those things, sir.
Admiral Eric Pressman: I would like to think that too. Because those things say more about a man than the rank on his collar or the uniform he wears. They define him. - Twelve years ago, a lot of older and more seasoned officers turned away from their duty. But you stood up for what was right. I'm sorry, Will. I know the kind of man you are. I know that I can count on you again.

[Picard interrogates Riker about the real purpose of the mission]
Commander William T. Riker: I've said all I can. I am under direct orders from Admiral Pressman not to discuss this, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Very well. He's an admiral, I'm a captain. I cannot force you to disobey his orders. Therefore, I will have to remain in the dark on this mission. And I will just have to trust that you will not let Pressman put this ship at unnecessary risk. And if I find that that trust has been misplaced, then I will have to reevaluate the command structure of this ship. Dismissed.

Commander William T. Riker: So, who won the contest?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, er, Paul Menegay, a seven-year-old. He did a most interesting clay sculpture of my head.
Commander William T. Riker: Was that the orange one? With the lumpy skin?

Admiral Eric Pressman: [about the dead crew of the Pegasus] I knew most of these people a lot longer than you did. Yes, it was tragic, but it was their fault!
Commander William T. Riker: You don't know that. Neither of us knows what happened after we left.
Admiral Eric Pressman: Well, it's not hard to guess. They tried to shut down an experiment they didn't understand; something went wrong and it killed them.
Commander William T. Riker: No - *we* killed them.
Admiral Eric Pressman: Now that doesn't sound like the same man who grabbed a phaser and defended his captain twelve years ago.
Commander William T. Riker: I've had twelve years to think about it. And if I had it to do over again, I would have grabbed the phaser and pointed it at you instead of them.

Commander William T. Riker: I wasn't a hero, and neither were you. What you did was wrong. And I was wrong to support you, but I was too young and too stupid to realize it. You were the captain, I was the ensign. I was just following orders.

Commander William T. Riker: I don't think anyone's going to come to your defense this time.

[last lines]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: You made a mistake twelve years ago. But your service since then has earned you a great deal of respect, but this incident could cost you some of that respect.
Commander William T. Riker: I can't help but feel that I should have come forward a long time ago.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: But when the moment came to make a decision, you made the right one. You chose to tell the truth and face the consequences. So long as you can still do that, then you deserve to wear that uniform. And I will still be proud to have you as my First Officer.

Commander William T. Riker: [the Federation cloaking device on board the Pegasus] I kept hoping it wouldn't be here. That it would have been destroyed or buried back there in that rockface.
Admiral Eric Pressman: What the hell's that supposed to mean?
Commander William T. Riker: It means I can't put this off any longer. Right up until now... I have had the luxury of time. But now I've got to make a choice. And Admiral... I'm afraid my choice is this. I can't let you start these experiments again. It was wrong twelve years ago, and it is wrong today.


Star Trek: Insurrection (1998)
Commander Riker: You think it's possible for two people to go back in time, undo a mistake they've made?
Counselor Deanna Troi: On this ship? Anything's possible...

[Referring to his clean-shaven face]
Commander Riker: Smooth as an android's bottom.

[to Deanna]
Commander Riker: I kiss you and you say "yuck"?

Commander Riker: Our guests have arrived. They're eating the floral arrangements on the banquet tables.
Cmdr. Beverly Crusher: I guess they don't believe in cocktails before dinner.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Oh, my God. Are they vegetarian? That's not in there.
Captain Picard: Perhap we should have the chef whip up a light balsamic vinaigrette, something that goes well with chrysanthemums.

[about Worf's pimple]
Commander Riker: Klingons never do anything small, do you?

Commander Riker: [the Enterprise is rocked by a photon torpedo from the Son'a ship] Photon torpedo. Isn't that the universal greeting when communications are down?
Geordi La Forge: I think it's the universal greeting when you don't like someone.

Commander Riker: [to Lt. Daniels] Tell them our transceiver assembly is down, that we can send messages but not receive them.
Lt. Daniels: I don't think they believe us.
Commander Riker: Why not?
[the Enterprise is rocked by a photon torpedo from a Son'a ship]
Commander Riker: Photon torpedo.
[Walking over to Geordi]
Commander Riker: Isn't that the universal greeting when communications are down?
Geordi La Forge: I think it's the universal greeting when you don't like someone.

Commander Riker: We're through running from these bastards!

Commander Riker: [referring to his shaven face] Smooth as an android's bottom, eh, Data?
Data: I beg your pardon, Sir?
Data: [later] Commander! May I?
[feels his face, shakes his head]


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Up the Long Ladder (#2.18)" (1989)
Commander William T. Riker: There is something damn odd going on here.

Brenna Odell: And what are you staring at? You never seen a woman before?
Commander William T. Riker: I thought I had.

Brenna Odell: You may have all the time in the world, but I've dozens of frightened and hungry children and women to look after.
Commander William T. Riker: And what about the men?
Brenna Odell: Well, I'm sure they'll find their comfort as they always do - in the bottom of a mug of homebrew!

[Riker observes Brenna cleaning the floor]
Commander William T. Riker: That isn't necessary. The ship will clean itself.
Brenna Odell: Well - good for the bloody ship.

Commander William T. Riker: I can see why your father wants to marry you off.
Brenna Odell: Oh! And why is that?
Commander William T. Riker: So he can have a pipe and a mug of beer in peace.

[Granger has asked to take fresh DNA from some of the Enterprise crew in order to clone them, which Riker refuses]
Commander William T. Riker: One William Riker is... unique, perhaps even special. But a hundred of him, a thousand of him... diminishes me in ways I can't even imagine.
Prime Minister Granger: You would be preserving yourself.
Commander William T. Riker: Human beings have other ways of doing that. We have children.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: They started out together. It seems only... fitting they should end up together.
Doctor Pulaski: It's a match made in heaven.
Commander William T. Riker: Unfortunately, it will have to be a shotgun wedding.

Doctor Pulaski: Tell me, is your entire population made up of clones, Prime Minister?
Lieutenant Worf: Clones?
Commander William T. Riker: Clones?
Prime Minister Granger: Clones.

Doctor Pulaski: [about the Bringloidi] You know, they were anachronistic in 2123. It will be interesting to see how they cope.
Commander William T. Riker: They'll learn and adapt. If Danilo Odell is any indication, they'll be running this place inside of a week.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Parallels (#7.11)" (1993)
[from an alternate universe]
Alternate Captain William T. Riker #2: We won't go back. You don't know what it's like in our universe. The Federation's gone, the Borg is everywhere! We're one of the last ships left. Please, you've got to help us!

[Worf is concerned that someone might have arranged a surprise party for his birthday]
Commander William T. Riker: A surprise party? Mr. Worf, I hate surprise parties. I would *never* do that to you.

Commander William T. Riker: [after surprising Worf with a party] I *love* surprise parties!

Commander William T. Riker: Something wrong?
Lieutenant Worf: I know what you are planning, sir. I will not be surprised.
Commander William T. Riker: Surprised? I don't know what you're talking about.
Lieutenant Worf: Of course you don't.

Lieutenant Wesley Crusher: Captain, we're receiving 285,000 hails.
Alternate Captain William T. Riker #1: I wish I knew what to tell them.

Alternate Captain William T. Riker #2: We won't go back!

Alternate Captain William T. Riker #1: [to genuine Picard] It's good to see you again, Captain. It's been a long time.

Alternate Captain William T. Riker #1: You don't remember any of this, do you?
Lieutenant Worf: I do remember. I just remember differently.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Gambit: Part 1 (#7.4)" (1993)
Commander William T. Riker: Acting Captain's log, stardate 47135.2 - Dr. Crusher has positively identified Captain Picard's DNA. There's no doubt now that he's dead.

[Crusher threatens a bar keeper with a phaser]
Commander William T. Riker: That's my sister. She's angry. She's got a vicious temper. I wouldn't cross her.

[Riker refuses to attend Captain Picard's memorial service]
Counselor Deanna Troi: Will, a memorial service helps to give everyone a sense of completion, helps them begin the healing process.
Commander William T. Riker: That's exactly the point. I don't want to heal!
Counselor Deanna Troi: Will...
Commander William T. Riker: [pointing at his chest] I've an open wound. Right here, it hurts like hell. I don't want it to get better, and I *don't* want to pretend that everything's all right.
Counselor Deanna Troi: I know you're angry.
Commander William T. Riker: You're damn right! And I intend to stay angry until I find whoever is responsible for the Captain's death.

Commander William T. Riker: This is not about revenge. This is about justice. The Captain died in a bar fight, for nothing. Somebody has to answer for that. Then I can mourn.

Baran: What were you doing on Barradas III?
Commander William T. Riker: William T. Riker, Commander, SC - 231-427.
Baran: Oh, really? Well, I am Arctus Baran, and I don't have a number.

[Riker has avoided an engine failure and thus saved Baran's ship and crew]
Commander William T. Riker: [to "Galen", smugly] You still wish you'd killed me?

Baran: [about his control devices] These devices were the idea of my predecessor. It's a convenient way of enforcing discipline.
Commander William T. Riker: What happened to him?
Baran: He failed to enforce it with me.

Commander William T. Riker: [to a group while in a seedy bar searching for Picard who's gone missing] Great story. I'll remember it the next time I'm in a knife fight.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Second Chances (#6.24)" (1993)
Commander William T. Riker: You know, I've been thinking we should probably let Dad know what happened.
Lt. Thomas Riker: I'm sure he'd be thrilled to know there're two of us now.

Commander William T. Riker: [to Troi] The look in your eyes, I recognize it. You used to have it for me.

Commander William T. Riker: [to his alter ego during a poker game] I practiced in the mirror too long to be fooled by that face. You're bluffing.

Lt. Thomas Riker: You always had the better hand - in everything.

Lt. Thomas Riker: Sometimes, I would look up into the sky and I'd think, if I tried hard enough, I could make you feel my presence - that if I could let you know that I was alive, maybe you'd wait for me. I know, it sounds... crazy; but there were times when I could've sw...
[he looks at Deanna, who has become somewhat melancholic]
Lt. Thomas Riker: [dismissively] What am I talking about?
Counselor Deanna Troi: The other day when I told you about how... Commander Riker and I didn't meet on Risa... What I didn't say was how disappointed I was.
Lt. Thomas Riker: You didn't have to. I knew.
Counselor Deanna Troi: I started to hear from him less and less. I knew his career was taking him away from me, but... I didn't want to believe it was over. I spent a lot of time thinking about him - wondering where he was, what he was doing. Sometimes, I'd look into the sky, and imagine that he knew. And that... somehow, he could sense me thinking about him. - So, who knows? Maybe one night, we were looking up at the same star and... you were thinking about me... And in a way... I was thinking about you.

Commander William T. Riker: Ever since he came on board, I find myself thinking about the choice that you and I made.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Me too.
Commander William T. Riker: Do me a favor. Be careful.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Will, I know you and he have had some problems.
Commander William T. Riker: That's not what I'm talking about. If he had gotten off the planet instead of me, don't you think he would've made the same choices that I made? I just don't want you to be hurt again.

Lt. Thomas Riker: I thought if one thing were clear by now, it's that you and I play things a little differently.
Commander William T. Riker: Why don't we wait and see who comes out on top?
Lt. Thomas Riker: I thought you were willing to settle for second, Commander.
Commander William T. Riker: I've never settled for anything in my life. I know what I want, I know what I've got, and you'd be lucky to do so well, Lieutenant.

[last lines]
Lt. Thomas Riker: [to Deanna] I waited a long time. I guess I can wait a little longer.
Lt. Thomas Riker: [to Will Riker] Take care of her.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Pen Pals (#2.15)" (1989)
[the Enterprise is investigating unusual geological activity in the Selcundi Drema sector]
Lt. Commander Data: Commander, I have been reviewing the unmanned probe scans. At some point during the last 150 years, the fifth planet of Selcundi Drema has shattered, forming an asteroid belt.
Commander William T. Riker: I'd call that geological instability.
Lieutenant Worf: Is there any indication that this is the work of an unknown intelligence?
Commander William T. Riker: This is geology, not malevolence. These planets live fast and die hard. The question is, why?

[Wesley is having trouble with his role as a team leader]
Commander William T. Riker: One of the reasons you've been given command is so you can make a few right decisions, which will lead to a pattern of success and help build self-confidence. If you don't trust your own judgment, you don't belong in the command chair.
Wesley Crusher: But what if I'm wrong?
Commander William T. Riker: Then you're wrong. It's arrogant to think that you'll never make a mistake.
Wesley Crusher: But what if it's something really important, I mean, not just a mineral survey? What if somebody dies because I made a mistake?
Commander William T. Riker: In your position, it's important to ask yourself one question: what would Picard do?
Wesley Crusher: He'd listen to everyone's opinion and then make his own decision. But he's Captain Picard.
Commander William T. Riker: Well, it doesn't matter. Once Picard makes his decision, does anyone question it?
Wesley Crusher: No way.
Commander William T. Riker: And why not?
Wesley Crusher: I'm not sure.
[Riker is ordered to the Captain over comm]
Commander William T. Riker: When you figure it out, you'll understand command.

Commander William T. Riker: You did a good job. I'm proud of you.
Wesley Crusher: Thank you, sir. Does it get any easier?
Commander William T. Riker: Nope.

Lt. Commander Data: Captain, your orders were to deliver the message, correct?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Yes.
Lt. Commander Data: Then, what is the difference between sending the message and delivering it personally?
Commander William T. Riker: A whopping big one, and you know it.

[Data is about to beam down to the planet]
Commander William T. Riker: O'Brien, take a nap, you didn't see any of this, you're not involved.
Chief Miles O'Brien: Right, sir, I'll just be standing over here dozing off.

[the crew is debating whether to stop the geological disintegration of Drema IV, with regard to the Prime Directive]
Commander William T. Riker: If there is a cosmic plan, is it not the height of hubris to think that we can or should interfere?
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: So what're you saying, that, that the Dremans are, are fated to die?
Commander William T. Riker: I think that's an option that we should be considering.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Consider it considered and rejected!

Commander William T. Riker: What a perfectly vicious little circle.

Commander William T. Riker: In your position it's important to ask yourself one question: what would Picard do?
Wesley Crusher: He'd listen to everyone's opinion and then make his own decision.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Royale (#2.12)" (1989)
Lieutenant Worf: What is this place? How did a being like you get here?
Asst. Manager: Why, this is the Royale, of course. And my personal life is really none of your business, thank you.
Commander William T. Riker: What he means is, what planet is this?
Asst. Manager: I beg your pardon?
Commander William T. Riker: This planet, what do you call it?
Asst. Manager: Earth. What do you call it?
Lieutenant Worf: We call it Theta VIII.
Asst. Manager: How charming.

Lt. Commander Data: [examining skeletal remains in hotel bed] Definitely human. Male.
Commander William T. Riker: Looks like the poor devil died in his sleep.
Lieutenant Worf: What a terrible way to die.

Commander William T. Riker: That's how we're getting out - we're *buying* this place.

Commander William T. Riker: When the train comes in, everybody rides.
Texas: Yeah. And I'm gettin' off at this station.

[last lines]
Commander William T. Riker: None of it makes any sense.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Like Fermat's Theorem, it's a puzzle we may never solve.

Commander William T. Riker: [reading from the diary entry of Colonel Richey] "I write this in the hope that it will someday be read by human eyes. I can only surmise at this point, but apparently, our exploratory shuttle was contaminated by an alien life form, which infected and killed all personnel except myself. I awakened to find myself here in the Royale Hotel, precisely as described in the novel I found in my room. And for the last 38 years, I have survived here. I have come to understand that the alien contaminators created this place for me out of some sense of guilt, presuming that the novel we had on board the shuttle about the Hotel Royale was, in fact, a guide to our preferred lifestyle and social habits. Obviously they thought that this was the world from which I came. I hold no malice toward my benefactors. They could not possibly know the hell that they have put me through. For it was such a badly-written book, filled with endless cliché and shallow characters... I shall welcome death when it comes."

Commander William T. Riker: Rest in peace, Colonel.

Lieutenant Worf: [pauses, then picks up the phone] Yes?
[turns to Riker and Data]
Lieutenant Worf: There's a female voice asking if we want room service.
Lt. Commander Data: I believe she's asking if we want the room cleaned.
Commander William T. Riker: Tell her no.
Lieutenant Worf: [turns to phone] No.
[pauses, then hangs up slowly]
Commander William T. Riker: What did she say?
Lieutenant Worf: She said the kitchen will be open 24 hours a day if we change our minds.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Outcast (#5.17)" (1992)
Soren: Tell me about males. What is it makes you different from females?
[Riker ponders on this]
Commander William T. Riker: Snips and snails and puppy dog tails...
Soren: You have a dog's tail?

Soren: My parents were pilots. I was flying with them before I could walk. As soon as I was old enough, I entered flight school. Krite was my instructor.
Commander William T. Riker: He had a good student.
Soren: "He"? Commander, there are no he's or she's in a species without gender.
Commander William T. Riker: Okay. For two days, I've been trying to construct sentences without personal pronouns. Now I give up. What should I use, 'it'? To us, that's rude.

Commander William T. Riker: [about split pea soup] It's very healthy. Helps to keep you warm on cold Alaskan nights.
Soren: We prefer to stay warm by sleeping with a friend.
Commander William T. Riker: I see...
Soren: Not to mate. Just to sleep together - for warmth.
Commander William T. Riker: It still sounds better than pea soup.

[Soren has asked what kind of women Human males prefer]
Commander William T. Riker: Some like quiet, demure women; others prefer a lot of energy. Some only respond to... physical attractiveness; others couldn't care less. There're no rules.
Soren: You make it sound very complex.
Commander William T. Riker: Believe me, it is.
Soren: Well, perhaps it is that complexity... which makes the differences in the sexes so... interesting.

Soren: The idea of gender - it is offensive to my people. You see, long ago, we had two sexes, as you do. But we evolved into a higher form. I don't mean to sound insulting; but on my planet, we have been taught that gender is... primitive.
Commander William T. Riker: "Primitive"?
Soren: Less evolved.
Commander William T. Riker: Maybe so. But sometimes, there's a lot to be said for an experience that's "primitive".

[Troi is looking at some old photos and other things of one of her father's ancestors]
Counselor Deanna Troi: I look at these faces and... I wonder who they are and if they could be related to me.
Commander William T. Riker: [holds up a teddy bear] This one looks like you.

[Riker is protesting against the psychotectic therapy Soren is to undergo]
Commander William T. Riker: Did it occur to you that she might like to stay the way she is?
Noor: No, you don't understand. We have a very high success rate in treating deviants like this, and, without exception, they become happier people after their treatment, and grateful - that we care enough to cure them. You see, Commander, on this world, everyone *wants* to be normal.
Commander William T. Riker: She is!

Commander William T. Riker: Soren... I love you.
Soren: I'm sorry.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Frame of Mind (#6.21)" (1993)
Doctor Beverly Crusher: We have one hour before curtain. How are you feeling?
Commander William T. Riker: I feel like an actor.

[repeated line]
Commander William T. Riker: I'm not crazy!

[repeated line]
Commander William T. Riker: It's not real.

Commander William T. Riker: If this is a real phaser, then I *was* on the Enterprise. But I fired it on myself, so I should be dead. None of this is real.

[a guard keeps Riker in check with a phaser]
Commander William T. Riker: You won't need that.
Attendant Mavek: [laughs] That's what you said the last time.

Counselor Deanna Troi: [after Riker has appeared rather confused during his play] It's nothing to be embarrassed about; we're your friends. We all know the stress you've been under. I'm sure everyone understands perfectly.
[Data passes by]
Lt. Commander Data: Commander, I must congratulate you on your performance this evening.
Commander William T. Riker: Oh?
Lt. Commander Data: Your unexpected choice to improvise was an effective method of drawing the audience into the plight of your character. You gave a truly realistic interpretation of multi-infarct dementia.
[walks on]
Commander William T. Riker: [bemused] Thank you.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Well, maybe not *everyone* understands.

Commander William T. Riker: I'm not that far gone, am I?
Attendant Mavek: Of course you are.

[final scene of the play 'Frame of Mind', with Riker as the patient and Data as the doctor]
Lt. Commander Data: Perhaps we should continue this discussion next week.
Commander William T. Riker: No. I wanna talk about this now!
Lt. Commander Data: You're starting to sound angry again. Maybe you need another treatment.
Commander William T. Riker: What I need is to get out of this cell! I've been locked up in here for days. You've controlled my every move, you told me what to eat, what to think, what to say. And when I show a glimmer of independent thought, you strap me down, inject me with drugs and call it a 'treatment'.
Lt. Commander Data: You're becoming agitated.
Commander William T. Riker: You bet I'm agitated! I may be surrounded by insanity, but I am not insane. And nothing you or anyone else can say will change that. And I won't let you or anyone else tell me that I am. You may be able to destroy my mind; but you can't change the fact that I'm innocent. I didn't kill that man!
Commander William T. Riker: [smirking madly] And that's what's driving *you* crazy.
Lt. Commander Data: I can see we have a lot of work to do.
[exits]
Commander William T. Riker: [shouts after him] Nothing you can say will change the fact that I'm innocent! I'm not crazy! I'm not crazy... I'm not crazy...
[lights fading out]


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Angel One (#1.13)" (1988)
Commander William T. Riker: To travel the distance we did in two days at warp 1, would have taken the Odin escape pod five months.
Lt. Commander Data: 5 months, 6 days, 11 hours, 2 minutes...
Commander William T. Riker: Thank you, Data.
Lt. Commander Data: ...and 57 seconds.

Commander William T. Riker: Mr. Data will need access to your library.
Beata: Our library is far too sophisticated for a man to comprehend.
Lt. Commander Data: I am an android, Mistress. Though anatomically, I am a male.
Beata: An amusing notion.

[Beata is trying to seduce Riker, who is slightly resisting]
Commander William T. Riker: It's not my function to seduce or be seduced by the leader of another world.
Beata: It's not the reason.
Commander William T. Riker: No, it's not. But will you still respect me in the morning?
Beata: I hope so.

Commander William T. Riker: [on Data's warning of breaking Starfleet rules by saving Ramsey's group] I'd rather face a court martial than live with the guilt of leaving these people to their deaths.

Commander William T. Riker: Martyrs cannot be silenced.

Commander William T. Riker: No power in the universe can hope to stop the force of evolution.

Commander William T. Riker: Commander Riker to the Enterprise.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: [over comm] This is the Enterprise, Crusher here.
Lieutenant Tasha Yar: Must be worse up there than we thought.

[last lines]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [hoarsely, still recovering from the virus] Mr. Data, set course for the Neutral Zone, warp 6.
Lt. Commander Data: Coordinates set, warp 6, on your mark, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [croaks, almost inaudibly] Engage.
Lt. Commander Data: ...Sir?
[Picard looks pleadingly at Riker]
Commander William T. Riker: Engage!


Star Trek: Nemesis (2002)
Commander William T. Riker: Captain, I don't have to remind you...
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I appreciate you concern, Number One. But I've been itching to try the Argo.
Commander William T. Riker: [smiles] I'll bet.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Captain's prerogative. There's no foreseeable danger and your wife would never forgive me if anything were to happen to you. You have the bridge... Mr. Troi!
[the bridge crew snickers]

Commander Deanna Troi: That was a lovely toast.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: It's from the heart.
Commander Deanna Troi: And you needn't worry. I'm going to brief your new counselor on everthing she needs to know.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, like hell you are. You already know too much about me. But I take it that there will be no speeches during the ceremony on Betazed?
Commander William T. Riker: No, no speeches and... no clothes.
Data: [toasting Riker and Troi] Ladies and gentlemen, and invited transgendered species. In my study of Terran and Betazoid conjugal rites, I have discovered it is traditional to present the happy couple with a gift. Given Commander Riker's affection for archaic musical forms, I have elected to present the following in honor of their conjugation.

Commander William T. Riker: [referring to the two decloaking Romulan warbirds] Just when I thought this couldn't get any worse.
Worf: We are being hailed.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: On screen.
Commander Donatra: Captain Picard. Commander Donatra of the Warbird Valdore. Might we be of assistance?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Assistance?
Commander Donatra: The Empire considers this a matter of internal security. We regret you've become involved.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [relieved] Commander, when this is over, I owe you a drink.
[the Valdore is attacked]
Commander Donatra: Romulan ale, Captain. Let's get to work.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: You heard the lady. Let's go to work!

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Don't worry, Number One, we'll still have you to Betazed with plenty of time to spare.
Commander William T. Riker: Thank you, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Where we will *all* honor the Betazoid tradition. Now, if you'll excuse me - I'll be in the gym.

Worf: The Romulans fought with honor.
Commander William T. Riker: Yes, they did, Mr. Worf.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: If I may, just a word of advice about your first command?
Captain William T. Riker: Anything.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: When your first officer insists that you can't go on away missions...
Captain William T. Riker: Ignore him. I intend to.
[pause]
Captain William T. Riker: Serving with you... has been an honor.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: The honor was mine - Captain.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: To absent friends... To family.
[Deanna starts crying over Data's heroic death]
Commander William T. Riker: First time I saw Data, he was leaning against a tree in the holodeck, trying to whistle. Funniest thing I ever saw. No matter what he did, he couldn't get the tune right. What was that song? I can't remember the song...


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Time Squared (#2.13)" (1989)
[Riker is making omelets for his fellow crew members]
Dr. Kate Pulaski: Ah, you have a practiced hand, Commander.
Commander William T. Riker: Yes, I have my father to thank.
Dr. Kate Pulaski: Your father? Liked to cook?
Commander William T. Riker: No, he hated it. That's why he left the chore to me.

Commander William T. Riker: A cook is only as good as his ingredients.

Commander William T. Riker: Flair is what marks the difference between artistry and mere competence.

Commander William T. Riker: When we brought the shuttle and the other Picard on board, we committed to a sequence of events which may be unalterable.

Commander William T. Riker: Captain, I think this is one instance where you should suppress your natural tendencies.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, really?
Commander William T. Riker: One of your strengths is your ability to... evaluate the dynamics of a situation, and then take a definitive, pre-emptive step, take charge. Now you're frustrated because you not only can't see the solution, you can't even define the problem.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Hm... Go on.
Commander William T. Riker: What we're facing is neither a person or a place, at least not yet. It's time.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: You're saying I should just sit down, shut up and wait.
Commander William T. Riker: Well, I wouldn't have put it exactly like that.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Not something I'd do easily.
Commander William T. Riker: Your Persian flaw.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Yes, perhaps it is.

Commander William T. Riker: Well, I know this much: we can't avoid the future.

Commander William T. Riker: Like a rag in a dog's mouth.
[after Picard has been twice hit and thrown about by an energy beam]


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Loud as a Whisper (#2.5)" (1989)
[a welcoming party is preparing to meet mediator Riva on his planet]
Counselor Deanna Troi: Have your sensors indicated any problem down there, Lieutenant?
Lieutenant Worf: None.
Counselor Deanna Troi: But you're feeling a certain confusion about this mission.
Lieutenant Worf: No.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Yes! I've never known you to have such strong emotions, except when you're expecting to do battle.
Lieutenant Worf: I am not expecting battle.
Commander William T. Riker: Then what is bothering you?
Lieutenant Worf: [taking a moment] Riva.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Ah. Riva negotiated several treaties between the Klingons and the Federation.
Lieutenant Worf: Before him, there was no Klingon word for '*peace*-maker'.

Commander William T. Riker: You will be careful, sir?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, cluck, cluck, cluck, Number One.
Commander William T. Riker: Sir?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: You're being a mother hen.

[Riva is being briefed on the conflict on Solais V]
Scholar: [interpreting for Riva] There is no need to continue. The specific issues of the conflict have no relevance.
Commander William T. Riker: So, none of the background which we have provided would be helpful in understanding why they continue to fight?
Scholar: [interpreting] The portfolio will indicate that the conflict is over a piece of land or wealth or some other tangible asset. But we both know that is not the case.
Commander William T. Riker: [understanding] They have been at war for so long, it has become personal.
Scholar: [interpreting] Exactly. The basis for peace must also be personal.

Scholar: [interpreting for Riva] They have been killing each other for a long time. Now they want to talk peace. So, something about the situation has recently changed. What's the new piece to the puzzle?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Data?
Lt. Commander Data: Unknown, sir.
Commander William T. Riker: Perhaps they have run out of people to kill.

Commander William T. Riker: Riva is not what I expected.

Commander William T. Riker: Our job is not to police the galaxies.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Isn't that my speech, Number One?

Riva: [after Riva's Chorus were slain and they beamed back, Riva is ranting in sign language] Stupid false egoistical...
[rambles on with back turned to camera]
Riva: ... tired of everything... three dead! What will we do now?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: How did this happen?
Commander William T. Riker: A total surprise. Apparently a member of one of the factions didn't like the idea of peace.
Riva: ...any time think
[Rubs hands through hair in frustration]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I don't understand what you're trying to say.
[Pleading gesture to Troi]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Counselor.
Riva: I'm not talking to you. I'm talking to myself!
Counselor Deanna Troi: Riva, go slowly.
Riva: What!
Counselor Deanna Troi: Slowly.
Riva: I'm not talking to him anyway.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Can you write it out?
Riva: No! Leave me alone!
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I am so sorry that your friends were killed.
Riva: I don't need your pity!
Riva: [Riva and Picard are talking simultaneously] ... tired of all of you hearing people not understanding me! I'm not talking to you anyway.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I'm sorry, I-I don't know what you are trying to tell me. We have to find some way to communicate with him.
Riva: I'm tired of you hearing people, arg!
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Data, he knows some kind of gestural language. Find out which one and learn it.
Lt. Commander Data: Aye, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Counselor, take him to Sick Bay. Maybe Pulaski can help.
Riva: I - my friends are dead! I-
[Picard grabs Riva's head]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Listen to me! You are not alone! Do you understand? We are all in this together... now.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Last Outpost (#1.4)" (1987)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Sometimes, Riker, the best way to fight is not to be there.
Commander William T. Riker: Yes, sir. "He will triumph who knows when to fight, and when not to fight."
[citing Sun Tzu]

[citing modern scholars, Data has compared the Ferengi to ancient Yankee traders of the 18th and 19th century]
Commander William T. Riker: Yankee traders, I like the sound of that.
Lt. Commander Data: Well, sir, I doubt they wear red, white and blue or look anything like Uncle Sam.

Portal: The Empire is forever.
Commander William T. Riker: Your Empire fell prey to a supernova.
Portal: We are forever.

Commander William T. Riker: Fear is the true enemy. The only enemy.

Portal: [referring to the Ferengi] What of them? Shall I destroy them?
Commander William T. Riker: Then they would learn nothing.
Portal: A most interesting conclusion. But... what if they never learn, Riker?
Commander William T. Riker: Is this a test also?
Portal: Hm. In life, one is always tested.

Commander William T. Riker: One final request, sir. Permission to beam a box of Data's Chinese finger puzzles over to the Ferengi? A thank you, for all they tried to do.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Make it so.

Lt. Commander Data: With this power drain, we may have trouble communicating with the Enterprise, sir.
Commander William T. Riker: Understood. Anything else?
Lt. Commander Data: Due to this force field, there is presently no way to beam us back, sir.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Oh, you had to ask...


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Captain's Holiday (#3.19)" (1990)
Commander William T. Riker: [to Picard] Have I mentioned how imaginative the Risian women are, sir?
Counselor Deanna Troi: Too often, Commander.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Tell me, Number One, is the entire crew aware of this little scheme to send me off on holiday?
Commander William T. Riker: I believe there are two ensigns stationed on deck 39 who know nothing about it.

Commander William T. Riker: Are you taking all these books?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, well, I'll take some light reading, in case I got bored.
Commander William T. Riker: "Ulysses" by James Joyce? "Ethics, Sophistry and the Alternate Universe", Ving Kuda - you call that 'light reading'?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: To each his own, Number One.

Commander William T. Riker: The more difficult the task, the sweeter the victory.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, yes. Number One - about that Horga'hn you requested...
Commander William T. Riker: Yes, sir?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: You and I need to have a little chat about that.

[last lines]
Counselor Deanna Troi: Was it a relaxing trip, Captain?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Uh-huh.
[and heads off to his ready room]
Commander William T. Riker: I knew he'd have a great time!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Where Silence Has Lease (#2.2)" (1988)
Lt. Cmdr. Data: [of the "hole" in space] Sir, our sensors are showing this to be the absence of everything. It is a void without matter or energy of any kind.
Commander William T. Riker: Yet this hole has a form, Data; it has height, width...
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Perhaps. Perhaps not, sir.
Capt. Picard: That's hardly a scientific observation, Commander.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Captain, the most elementary and valuable statement in science, the beginning of wisdom, is, "I do not know". I do not know what that is, sir.

Commander William T. Riker: Remember the course in ancient history at Starfleet Academy? About the time when men still believed the Earth was flat?
Capt. Picard: Mmm. And that the sun revolved around it.
Commander William T. Riker: And that if a ship sailed too far out into the ocean, it would fall off the edge of the world.
Capt. Picard: "Beyond this place, there be dragons." It's even said that crews threatened to hang their captain from the yardarm if he refused to turn back.
Commander William T. Riker: I'm sure no one here has that in mind, sir.
Capt. Picard: How comforting, Number One.

[the Enterprise is set to auto destruct and time is running out]
Enterprise Computer: Ten seconds to auto-destruct.
Commander William T. Riker: [tense] Captain...
Capt. Picard: Abort auto-destruct sequence.
Enterprise Computer: Riker, William T., do you concur?
Commander William T. Riker: Yes, absolutely, I do indeed concur wholeheartedly!
Enterprise Computer: Auto-destruct canceled.
[everyone breathes a huge sigh of relief]
Capt. Picard: A simple 'yes' would have sufficed, Number One.
Commander William T. Riker: I didn't want there to be any chance of misunderstanding.

[Riker and Worf have run one of Worf's rigorous calisthenics programs on the holodeck]
Commander William T. Riker: You do this every day?
Lieutenant Worf: No, Commander. Usually, my calisthenics are more... intense. But those sessions are too personal to be shared.
Commander William T. Riker: I'll bet they are.

[last lines]
Capt. Picard: Ensign, put us back on course, warp 3.
Wesley Crusher: Aye, sir, warp 3.
Commander William T. Riker: And Ensign, if you encounter any holes... steer clear.

Commander William T. Riker: [Worf loses control during a training exercise] The exercise is over!
[Worf doesn't hear him, and attacks]
Commander William T. Riker: AT EASE, LIEUTENANT!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Time's Arrow: Part 1 (#5.26)" (1992)
Counselor Deanna Troi: Have you ever heard Data define friendship?
Commander William T. Riker: No.
Counselor Deanna Troi: How did he put it? "As I experience certain sensory input patterns, my mental pathways become accustomed to them. The inputs eventually are anticipated and even missed when absent."

Commander William T. Riker: It's just that our mental pathways have become accustomed to your sensory input patterns.
Lt. Commander Data: Hm. I understand. I am also fond of you, Commander. And you as well, Counselor.

Counselor Deanna Troi: I heard about Data.
Commander William T. Riker: Yeah.
Counselor Deanna Troi: It's having an unusually traumatic effect on everyone.
Commander William T. Riker: Yeah.
Counselor Deanna Troi: If you don't want to talk about it, it's okay.
Commander William T. Riker: I'm fine. Just...
Counselor Deanna Troi: Angry.
Commander William T. Riker: I'm not angry... Yeah, I'm angry.

Lt. Commander Data: It seems clear that my life is to end in the late 19th century.
Commander William T. Riker: Not if we can help it.
Lt. Commander Data: There is no way anyone can prevent it, sir. At some future date, I will be transported back to 19th-century Earth, where I will die. It has occurred. It will occur.

Counselor Deanna Troi: There's life here... A child, an old woman... Dozens more, hundreds. Terrified.
Commander William T. Riker: Terrified?
Counselor Deanna Troi: My God, Will, they're Human.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Can you predict how long this has been in the cavern?
Lt. Commander Data: Decomposition strongly indicates that life was terminated approximately five hundred years ago. That would be consistent with the other artifacts we recovered.
Commander William T. Riker: Your head is not an "artifact"!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Loss (#4.10)" (1990)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Mr. Data, what velocity would put us back on schedule?
Lt. Commander Data: A resumption of our present course at warp six will place us in the T'lli Beta system in six days, thirteen hours, 47 minutes.
Commander William T. Riker: What, no seconds?
Lt. Commander Data: I have discovered, sir, a certain level of impatience when I calculate a lengthy time interval to the nearest second. However, if you wish...
Commander William T. Riker: No, no. Minutes is fine.

Counselor Deanna Troi: You have no idea how frightening it is to... to just be here, without sensing you, without sharing your feelings.
Commander William T. Riker: That's it, isn't it? We're on equal footing now.
Counselor Deanna Troi: What?
Commander William T. Riker: You always had an advantage, a little bit of control of every situation. That must have been a very safe position to be in. To be honest, I'd always thought there was something a little too... aristocratic about your Betazoid heritage, as if your Human side wasn't quite good enough for you.
Counselor Deanna Troi: That isn't true.
Commander William T. Riker: Isn't it?

Counselor Deanna Troi: You know what the worst part of this is? And I've seen it happen to so many patients.
Commander William T. Riker: What?
Counselor Deanna Troi: The way other people change. How they start to treat you differently. They walk on eggshells around you. Sometimes they avoid you altogether. Sometimes they become overbearing - "reach out a helping hand to the blind woman".
Commander William T. Riker: I'm sorry if I...
Counselor Deanna Troi: I will not be treated that way!

[Riker takes Troi in his arms to console her]
Counselor Deanna Troi: Is this how you handle all your personnel problems?
Commander William T. Riker: Sure. You'd be surprised how far a hug goes with Geordi - or Worf.

Counselor Deanna Troi: [on the two-dimensional beings] It's all right. They're home. We were wrong. The cosmic string was never dangerous to them; it was the one place in the galaxy they most wanted to be.
Commander William T. Riker: Deanna?
Counselor Deanna Troi: Yes - I sensed it!

Counselor Deanna Troi: Thank you for making me face my other half.
Commander William T. Riker: Frightening, wasn't it?
Counselor Deanna Troi: A little. You were right, though. There is something to be learned when you're not in control of every situation.
Commander William T. Riker: Welcome to the Human race.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Starship Mine (#6.18)" (1993)
Cmdr. Hutchinson: You must be Will Riker.
Commander William T. Riker: I must be.

Orton: I am not interested in hearing your hostage negotiation tactics, Commander.
Commander William T. Riker: Well, it can't hurt you to listen, can it?
Orton: All right.
Commander William T. Riker: Thank you. Now...
[Riker turns away from Orton]
Commander William T. Riker: ...the first thing I think we need to discuss is this:
[Riker reels around and punches Orton in the face]

Counselor Deanna Troi: [nursing Riker's wound] I thought you were just going to talk to him.
Commander William T. Riker: I did. He just didn't like what I had to say.

Commander William T. Riker: [after having introduced non-stop small talkers Hutchinson and Data to one another] I'm not sure which one to feel sorry for.

Counselor Deanna Troi: [about Data and "Hutch"] They're still at it.
Commander William T. Riker: Non-stop. I have to admit, it has a sort of strange fascination. How long can two people talk about nothing?

[last lines]
Lieutenant Worf: Captain - you keep a saddle on board?
Commander William T. Riker: Mr. Worf, I'm surprised at you.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Anyone who is an experienced rider naturally has his own saddle.
Counselor Deanna Troi: It's perfectly normal.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Actually it came in handy. I only wish I'd had the opportunity to use it on a horse.
Lieutenant Worf: [confused] Of course...


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Cause and Effect (#5.18)" (1992)
Commander William T. Riker: Sometimes I wonder if he's stacking the deck.
Lt. Commander Data: I assure you, Commander, the cards are sufficiently randomized.
Lieutenant Worf: I hope so.

[first lines]
Commander William T. Riker: Damage report!
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Casualty reports coming in from all over the ship!
Lt. Commander Data: The starboard nacelle has sustained a direct impact. We are venting drive plasma.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: Initiating emergency core shutdown!
Ensign Ro Laren: Inertial dampers failing. We're losing attitude control.
Commander William T. Riker: This is the bridge. All hands to emergency escape pods!
Lt. Commander Data: Core shutdown was unsuccessful. We are losing antimatter containment.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: We've got to eject the core!
Lt. Commander Data: Ejection systems offline. Core breach is imminent.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: All hands abandon ship! Repeat: all hands aban...!
[the Enterprise explodes]

Lieutenant Worf: [at the poker table] I am experiencing... nIb'poH - the feeling I have done this before.
Commander William T. Riker: Yes, last Tuesday night.
Lieutenant Worf: That's not what I mean.

Commander William T. Riker: [after losing a poker game] How'd you know I was bluffing?
Doctor Beverly Crusher: I just had a feeling.
Commander William T. Riker: I guess it's better to be lucky than good.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: It's the way your left eyebrow raises when you're bluffing... Just kidding, Commander.

[the Enterprise is faced with a cloud-like distortion]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Back us off, Ensign. Nice and slow.
Ensign Ro Laren: Aye, sir. Captain, maneuvering thrusters are not responding.
Lt. Commander Data: The distortion field is fluctuating.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: All main systems just went down. Power levels are dropping rapidly.
Commander William T. Riker: Red alert.
Lt. Commander Data: There is an energy build-up in the distortion field.
Counselor Deanna Troi: We have to get out of here, now.
Lt. Commander Data: Captain, something is emerging.
[another starship is coming out of the cloud]
Commander William T. Riker: Shields up. Evasive maneuvers.
Lieutenant Worf: Shields inoperative.
Ensign Ro Laren: The helm is not responding.
Lt. Commander Data: The vessel is on a collision course. Impact in 36 seconds.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Hail them.
Lieutenant Worf: No response.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Suggestions?
Commander William T. Riker: Decompress main shuttlebay. The explosive reaction may blow us out of the way.
Lt. Commander Data: Captain, I suggest we use the tractor beam to alter the other ship's trajectory.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Make it so, Mr. Worf.
Lieutenant Worf: Engaging tractor beam.
[the two ships collide]

Commander William T. Riker: You're going to call my bluff, aren't you? I think I'll quit while I'm ahead.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: How did you know I was going to call your bluff?
Commander William T. Riker: I just had a feeling.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Me too...


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Price (#3.8)" (1989)
[the crew and Mendoza are assessing their rivals at the negotiations]
Commander William T. Riker: I think that Devinoni is the one that we need to watch out for.
Seth Mendoza: An accurate observation. How did you recognize that?
Commander William T. Riker: Well, he was the most comfortable one in the group.
Seth Mendoza: You must play poker, Commander.
Commander William T. Riker: [feigning ignorance] Poker - is that a game of some sort?

Devinoni Ral: [about negotiating] You know, you're very good at this - very good. Much better than you realize.
Commander William T. Riker: Well, I hope I'm better than *you* realize.

[Picard asks Riker to replace Mendoza as Federation representative at the negotiations]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: You're the next likely choice. And Mr. Mendoza will certainly agree. He's quite impressed by your natural instincts.
Commander William T. Riker: Excuse me, sir, but those weren't natural instincts; those were poker instincts. A card game doesn't exactly prepare me for this.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Yes, the stakes are higher. But then, isn't that when the game gets interesting, Commander?

Devinoni Ral: Commander, I realize what a difficult position this must be for you. If you don't understand something, I hope you won't be too embarrassed to ask me.
Commander William T. Riker: I think I have an idea what the rules are.
Devinoni Ral: Well, that's what makes it so interesting. The rules of the game change to fit the moment.
Commander William T. Riker: Not unlike commanding a starship, Mr. Ral.

Devinoni Ral: [of Troi] She's a remarkable woman. Brilliant, lovely... very passionate. And she could've been yours, Will. But you just didn't do enough to keep her. And now, well... I'm here. And I'm gonna take her, too.
Commander William T. Riker: [smiles sardonically] That's the first bad play I've seen you make. If you can bring happiness into Deanna's life, nothing would please me more. You know, you're really not such a bad sort, Ral. Except you don't have any values - beyond the value of today's bid, that is. Deanna is just the woman to bring some meaning to your sorry existence, if you're smart enough to take it. I doubt that you are. To the last mile.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Child (#2.1)" (1988)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Counselor Deanna Troi is pregnant. She... she is going to have a baby.
Commander William T. Riker: Baby?
[everyone looks at Deanna]
Commander William T. Riker: This is a surprise.
Counselor Deanna Troi: More so for me.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Acting Ensign Wesley Crusher has expressed his desire to remain on the Enterprise.
Commander William T. Riker: I see. And, how did you respond?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I haven't yet, Number One, I didn't feel it was my decision alone. His remaining, will have effects on all of us.
Commander William T. Riker: Good point, with his mother gone, who will see to his studies?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: That's true. Of course, that responsibility would fall to Commander Data.
Commander William T. Riker: And, who will tuck him in at night?
Wesley Crusher: [embarrassed] Come on, Commander!
Lieutenant Worf: [somewhat reluctant] I will accept that responsibility.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Well, we know he'll get his sleep
[looks to Worf and smiles]
Counselor Deanna Troi: .
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [looks to Riker, put his hand on his chin in thought] You know, Number One? It seems to me that you would be best suited for these responsibilities. Are you willing to serve?
Commander William T. Riker: Difficult decision.
[Riker looks to Wesley, who looks back in quiet anticipation. Riker grins]
Commander William T. Riker: Yes, I can do that.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [looks to Wesley] Very well, Mr. Crusher, contact your mother at Starfleet Medical, give her my regards, and tell her that you have my permission to remain on the Enterprise. But
[points to Wesley]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I will abide by her wishes.
Wesley Crusher: [grins] Yes, Sir! Thank you, Sir! I know she'll agree!
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Now, do you have course and speed laid in?
Wesley Crusher: Yes Sir, they are!
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Very well, Mr. Crusher. Engage.
[Wesley grins, and sets the Enterprise's next course]

Lt. Commander Data: [on Troi's delivery of Ian] Thank you for allowing me to participate. It was remarkable.
Counselor Deanna Troi: [Commander Riker approaches, smiling, Troi looks to him] Were you here all along?
Commander William T. Riker: Yes. He's beautiful, Deanna. Just like his mother.
[grins, leans in and kisses Deanna's cheek]
Dr. Kate Pulaski: How do you feel?
Counselor Deanna Troi: Fine. Wonderful.
[looks to the baby in her arms, then back to Pulaski]
Counselor Deanna Troi: Thank you, Doctor, for everything.
Dr. Kate Pulaski: Amazing.
Counselor Deanna Troi: [Deanna looks back to the baby again, smiling. A tear of happiness and joy rolls down her cheek, as she sighs a deep breath]

Commander William T. Riker: I don't mean to be indelicate,
[turns to Troi]
Commander William T. Riker: but who's the father?
Counselor Deanna Troi: Last night, *while I slept*, something, that I can only describe as a presence, entered my body.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: A life form of unknown origin and intent, is *breeding*, right now, inside of Counselor Troi. Our purpose here today is determine what course of action we need to take.
Lieutenant Worf: The decision is clear. The pregnancy must be terminated to protect the ship.
Commander William T. Riker: [as the bridge crew is discussing the issue, Troi hears a heartbeat within her mind, and looks down at her stomach, then back up to the conference room screen which shows a gestating fetus. The crew's voices are muffled, but can still be clearly heard as Troi is focusing on the baby growing inside her] This situation presents a danger to us and the counselor. It's an invasion, of what, I don't know.
Lt. Commander Data: Captain, this is a life form. Denying it the right to survive, takes away our opportunity to study it.

Dr. Kate Pulaski: [Pulaski rushes in and begins to examine Ian] What happened? Did he eat anything, did he fall?
Counselor Deanna Troi: [shakes her head] No!
Lt. Commander Data: [reads the readout on his tricorder] Commander, the child is the source of the unusual radiation.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Ian said he was the reason the ship was in danger.
Lt. Commander Data: That analysis is correct.
Dr. Kate Pulaski: [continues to try to bring Ian around] I'm losing life signs.
Counselor Deanna Troi: [holds Ian's lifeless hand] You must save him!
Dr. Kate Pulaski: [Pulaski continues to work, but to no success. She runs her scanner over Ian again, then bows her head] I'm sorry.
[Troi kneels down and begins to weep over the loss of her son. Suddenly, Ian's body disappears and becomes a small, radiant star of energy. The energy star floats into Troi's open hands and Deanna cups her hands around it. Her weeping slowly subsides, then she smiles. Finally, like releasing a dove, she opens her hands and the energy star floats up and through the bulkhead into space]
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: [Riker's combadge beeps] Riker here.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Commander, the containment field has... stabilized!
Commander William T. Riker: Thank you, Lieutenant.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Then Ian was right. He was the cause.
Commander William T. Riker: Apparently so.
Counselor Deanna Troi: [Deanna shakes her head and looks down for a moment, then looks back up at everyone] He is a life force entity. When we passed each other in space, he was curious about us, so he thought the best way to learn, was to go through the process. To be born, to live as one of us, and in that way, to understand us. He never meant any harm.
Commander William T. Riker: There was a moment, when you smiled.
Counselor Deanna Troi: He said "Thank you". I told him, we will miss him.
[looks down again]
Counselor Deanna Troi: And, I will.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Unification II (#5.8)" (1991)
Amarie: A new face.
Commander William T. Riker: Same one I've always had.

Commander William T. Riker: I have to ask you about your husband.
Amarie: Well - it was nice while it lasted... Which husband?
Commander William T. Riker: The dead one, I'm afraid.
Amarie: Ooh, you must be from the Enterprise. You destroyed his ship.
Commander William T. Riker: He was into some bad business. He took the evidence with him.
Amarie: His one endearing quality - he always cleaned up after himself.

Commander William T. Riker: Let me explain what'll happen to you if you don't tell me about the Vulcan ship. Your right-of-passage through this sector will be revoked, and more than that, I will be very unhappy.

[Riker has addressed Amarie about her late husband]
Amarie: And what do you want from me?
Commander William T. Riker: I was hoping you might know his business partners.
Amarie: And why should I help you?
Commander William T. Riker: To be honest, I can't think of a good reason.
Amarie: Well, you did kill my ex-husband. And that's not a bad start. So why don't you drop a few coins in the jar and I'll see what I remember.
Commander William T. Riker: I don't carry money.
Amarie: Well, you don't offer much, do you?
Commander William T. Riker: [smiles] Move over.
[He starts playing a jazz tune on her keyboard]
Amarie: [who has four arms] Oh, just what I needed - another pair of hands.

Commander William T. Riker: Is there a problem?
Omag: Yes. I need more napkins!
Commander William T. Riker: Use your sleeve.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Icarus Factor (#2.14)" (1989)
[Riker and O'Brien are seeing Dr. Pulaski and Riker's father in deep embrace]
Commander William T. Riker: [surprised] They know each other.
Chief Miles O'Brien: No kiddin'. I know her too; but we don't do *that*.

Doctor Pulaski: Did he ever tell you why he never remarried?
Commander William T. Riker: What woman would have him, with an ego like that?
Doctor Pulaski: I would have, in a cold minute.

Counselor Deanna Troi: I'm supposed to know how everyone feels, but... I can't read you right now.
Commander William T. Riker: Perhaps your own feelings are getting in the way.
Counselor Deanna Troi: My job is to help others sort out *their* emotions. My own feelings are beside the point.
Commander William T. Riker: Not to me. Our feelings are what make us all human.

[Riker has decided to stay on board the Enterprise]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Any particular reason for this change of heart?
Commander William T. Riker: Motivated self-interest. Right now, the best place for me to be is here.

Commander William T. Riker: [to his father, when he discovers why he could never beat him at Anbo-Jyutsu as a child] You cheated me!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The High Ground (#3.12)" (1990)
[Dr. Crusher has been abducted by terrorists]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I would like to leave Commander Riker here to assist in your search for Dr. Crusher.
Alexana Devos: [shrugs] If you like.
Commander William T. Riker: You don't sound very optimistic.
Alexana Devos: I know my enemy, Commander; they don't leave much room for optimism.

[Devos has agreed to go along with Riker's attempt to contact the Ansata separatists]
Commander William T. Riker: Is that what you want?
Alexana Devos: What I want... is to go home. Back to my own country. To leave behind the round-ups, the interrogations. The bodies lying in the street. To be able to walk without the bodyguards, and not to have to jump at every unexpected noise. That's what I want, Riker!

[Devos has shot Finn in order to save Picard's life]
Commander William T. Riker: You didn't have to kill him.
Alexana Devos: As a prisoner, he would have been a focus for violence, as his followers tried to free him. Now, he's a martyr. But the death toll might go down, at least in the short term. It's an imperfect solution, for an imperfect world.

[Crusher has managed to talk the Ansata boy out of shooting Devos]
Alexana Devos: Already another one to take his place. It never ends.
Commander William T. Riker: He could've killed you. He didn't. Maybe the end begins with one boy putting down his gun.

Alexana Devos: [discussing her methods in dealing with the Ansata] Believe it or not, I always considered myself moderate.
Commander William T. Riker: What changed your mind?
Alexana Devos: Being stationed here the last six months. Watching the body count grow. The three assassination attempts on my life.
Commander William T. Riker: I can see where that could affect your point of view.
Alexana Devos: The event that really opened my eyes took place only a few days after my arrival. A terrorist bomb destroyed a shuttlebus... 60 schoolchildren. There were no survivors. The Ansata claimed it was a mistake. That their intended target was a police transport. As if that made everything alright. That day I vowed to put an end to terrorism in this city. And I will.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Lonely Among Us (#1.6)" (1987)
Commander William T. Riker: We no longer enslave animals for food purposes.
Badar N'D'D: But we have seen Humans eat meat.
Commander William T. Riker: You've seen something as fresh and tasty as meat, but inorganically materialized, out of patterns used by our transporters.
Badar N'D'D: This is sickening. It's barbaric!

Commander William T. Riker: You're on notice that all of your weapons, no matter what their basic function, are being confiscated. Violence will not be tolerated on the Enterprise.
Badar N'D'D: Of course not. And if any does occur, let me assure you, it will not be we Anticans who start it.
Lieutenant Tasha Yar: Thank you, sir.
[Riker and Yar leave the Anticans' quarters]
Badar N'D'D: But... we will *finish* it.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: The immortal Sherlock Holmes would have an interesting view of our mystery, I believe.
Commander William T. Riker: But I'm afraid we're going to have to find our solution... without history's greatest consulting detective.
Lt. Commander Data: [to himself, inaudibly] Holmes...?

Lieutenant Tasha Yar: We can learn something from non-disclosure?
Lt. Commander Data: [smoking pipe] Indubitably, my good woman.
[Yar looks quizzically at Riker]
Commander William T. Riker: It's something the Captain mentioned. Sherlock Holmes. Indubitably, Data has been studying him.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [confused] What the devil am I doing here?
Commander William T. Riker: Sounds like our Captain.
[after Picard has been beamed back out of the nebula]


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Ethics (#5.16)" (1992)
Lieutenant Worf: I have a personal favor to ask.
Commander William T. Riker: Name it.
Lieutenant Worf: I want you to assist me in performing the Hegh'bat ceremony. I want you to help me die.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I understand from Dr. Crusher that Worf will never regain the use of his legs.
Commander William T. Riker: That doesn't mean that his life is over.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: That's a very Human perspective, Will. For a Klingon in Worf's position... his life is over.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: You and I could learn to live with a disability like that, but not Worf. His life ended when those containers fell on him. Now, we don't have to agree with it, we don't have to understand it. But we do have to respect his beliefs.
Commander William T. Riker: I can respect his beliefs, but he is asking me to take an active part in his committing suicide!
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: He's asking for your help, because you're his friend. And that means that you're gonna have to make your decision based on that friendship.
Commander William T. Riker: [smiles wryly] Which leaves me right back where I started.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Will... Look, I'm sorry, I cannot help you to make this decision. But I can tell you this: Klingons choose their friends with great care. If he didn't know he could count on you, he would never have asked.

Lieutenant Worf: Will you, or will you not, help me with the Hegh'bat?
Commander William T. Riker: You are my friend. And in spite of everything I've said, if it were my place, I would probably help you. But I have been studying Klingon ritual and Klingon law, and I've discovered... it is not my place to fill that role. According to tradition, that honor falls to a family member - preferably the oldest son.
Lieutenant Worf: That is impossible. He is a child.
Commander William T. Riker: "The son of a Klingon is a man the day he can first hold a blade." True?
Lieutenant Worf: Alexander is not fully Klingon. He is part Human!
Commander William T. Riker: That's an excuse. What you really mean... is, it would be too hard to look at your son and tell him to bring you the knife, watch you stab it into your heart, then pull the knife out of your chest and wipe your blood on his sleeve. That's the rite of death, isn't it? Well, I'm sorry, Mr. Worf - I can't help you. There's only one person on this ship who can.

Commander William T. Riker: Remember Sandoval? Hit with a disrupter blast two years ago - she lived for about a week... Fang-Lee, Marla Aster, Tasha Yar? How many men and women, how many friends have we watched die? I've lost count. Every one of them, every single one fought for life until the very end!
Lieutenant Worf: I do not welcome death, Commander.
Commander William T. Riker: Are you sure? Because I get the sense you're feeling pretty noble about this whole thing. "Look at me! Aren't I courageous, aren't I an honorable Klingon?" Let me remind you of something: a Klingon does not put his desires above those of his family, or his friends.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Contagion (#2.11)" (1989)
Commander William T. Riker: Fate. Protects fools, little children and ships named Enterprise.

[the Enterprise is going through a series of system failures while faced with a Romulan battle cruiser]
Wesley Crusher: Sir, the shields are back up.
Commander William T. Riker: Impeccable timing!
Wesley Crusher: Sir, the shields are back down.
Ensign Williams: Phaser banks are down.
Wesley Crusher: Shields are back up.
Counselor Deanna Troi: In another time and place, this could be funny.
Commander William T. Riker: Status of torpedo banks?
Ensign Williams: They're down too.
Commander William T. Riker: [frustrated] If it should become necessary to fight, could you arrange to find me some rocks to throw at them?

Commander William T. Riker: Our own ignorance could kill us.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: We're going to assume the Yamato's mission.
Commander William T. Riker: And risk a war?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Perhaps... prevent one.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I have been studying the Iconians since I was a cadet. I have to be the one to go. The Enterprise is yours.
Commander William T. Riker: [to himself] As long as she lasts.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Game (#5.6)" (1991)
Commander William T. Riker: Chocolate ice cream, chocolate fudge and chocolate chips... You're not depressed, are you?

Commander William T. Riker: [to Troi and her chocolate ice cream] Would you like me to leave you two alone?

Commander William T. Riker: What is this?
Etana Jol: It's a game. Everyone here's playing it. It's fun!

[Troi eats a spoonful of ice cream]
Commander William T. Riker: Doesn't it taste good?
Counselor Troi: Mm, of course it does, but... it's not just a matter of taste. It's the whole experience. First of all, you have to spoon the fudge around the rim, leaving only the ice cream in the middle. Then, you gently spoon the ice cream around the sides, like you're sculpting it. Relish every bite. Make every one an event. And then, with the last spoonful, close your eyes...
[eats another spoonful with her eyes closed and smiles]
Commander William T. Riker: I had no idea it was such a ritual.

Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: Personal logs... diagnostics... duty logs, they all appear normal; there's no evidence of anything that could lead to Data's shutdown.
Commander William T. Riker: Maybe we should ask his cat.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Thine Own Self (#7.16)" (1994)
Commander William T. Riker: Did you come here for something in particular or just general Riker-bashing?

Commander William T. Riker: [after Troi has performed the engineering qualification test] Congratulations - you just destroyed the Enterprise.

Counselor Deanna Troi: Tell me one thing - is there a solution? Or is this simply a test of my ability to handle a no-win situation?
Commander William T. Riker: There is a solution.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Then give me time to find it!
Commander William T. Riker: I can't. As much as I care about you, my first duty is to the ship.

[Troi has passed the bridge officer's test, having had to resort to a drastic command decision]
Counselor Deanna Troi: I knew that was part of being in command, and I thought I'd prepared for it. But when the moment came, I hesitated. Maybe you were right, maybe I'm not cut out for this.
Commander William T. Riker: You did exactly what you had to do. You considered all your options, you tried every alternative and then you made the hard choice. Come on. Let's get out of here, Commander.

Gia: We didn't know his real name. So we called him Jayden.
[... ]
Gia: What was his real name?
Commander William T. Riker: Data.
Gia: Data... He was my friend too.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Déjà Q (#3.13)" (1990)
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Captain, the aliens have disappeared. And so has the shuttle.
Commander William T. Riker: Scan the sector.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: I have, sir.
Capt. Picard: Well... I suppose that is the end of Q.
[with a flash, Q appears on the bridge with a trumpet, accompanied by a mariachi band]
Q: AU CONTRAIRE, MON CAPITAINE! HE'S BACK!
[the band starts playing, accompanied by Q with gusto]

[Q has made appear two scantily clad women to fawn on Riker]
Commander William T. Riker: I don't need your fantasy women.
Q: Oh, you're so stolid! You weren't like that before the beard.

Q: I know human beings. They're all sopping over with compassion and forgiveness. They can't wait to absolve... almost any offense. It's an inherent weakness of the breed.
Capt. Picard: On the contrary, it is a strength.
Q: You call it what you will. But I think you'll protect me, even though I've tormented you now and again.
Commander William T. Riker: Fighting off all the species which you've insulted would be a full-time mission. That's not the one I signed up for.

Q: [about the Calamarain, which he has tortured in the past] They simply have no sense of humor - a character flaw with which you can personally identify.
Commander William T. Riker: I say we turn him over to them.
Q: Oh, well, I take it back. You do have a sense of humor, a dreadful one at that.

Q: I'm forgiven! My brothers and sisters of the Continuum have taken me back. I'm immortal again! Omnipotent again!
Commander William T. Riker: Swell.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Timescape (#6.25)" (1993)
[Dr. Crusher is treating a cut on Riker's forehead]
Doctor Beverly Crusher: You've gotta stop playing parrises squares as if you're twenty-one years old. One of these days, you're gonna fall and break your neck, and I'm not gonna be able to heal that as easily.
Commander William T. Riker: I wasn't playing parrises squares.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Worf's calisthenic program?
Commander William T. Riker: No.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: I give up. What was it?
Commander William T. Riker: I was trying to feed Spot.

Commander William T. Riker: [referring to Data's cat] 'Hissing ball of fur!'

Commander William T. Riker: [after Crusher has suggested to take care of Spot] Oh, by the way - you'll need this!
[throws her a phaser]

[last lines]
Lt. Commander Data: I have been testing the aphorism, "A watched pot never boils." I have boiled the same amount of water in this kettle sixty-two times. In some cases I have ignored the kettle; in others, I have watched it intently. In every instance, the water reaches its boiling point in precisely 51.7 seconds. It appears I am not capable of perceiving time any differently than my internal chronometer.
Commander William T. Riker: Why don't you turn it off?
Lt. Commander Data: Sir?
Commander William T. Riker: Data, people do not *have* internal chronometers. Why don't you see what happens if you turn yours off?
Lt. Commander Data: Thank you, sir. I will try that.
[Riker nods and gets up to leave, but stops]
Commander William T. Riker: Just don't be late for your shift!

Commander William T. Riker: [confused about recent events] Captain?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [sighs] It's going to take... a little time to explain, Number One.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Manhunt (#2.19)" (1989)
Counselor Troi: [to Picard] My mother is beginning a physiological phase. It's one that all Betazoid women must deal with as they enter midlife.
Commander William T. Riker: Yes, it's something Troi warned me about when we first started to see each other. A Betazoid woman, when she goes through this phase... quadruples her sex drive.
Counselor Troi: Or more.
Commander William T. Riker: Or more? You never told me that.
Counselor Troi: I didn't want to frighten you.

Commander William T. Riker: I'm sorry they startled you, Mrs. Troi. They're Antedean delegates; they're being stored here temporarily.
Lwaxana Troi: Delegates? Last time I saw something like that it was being served on a plate.

[Riker prevents Deanna from telling her mother off]
Counselor Troi: Why did you stop me? Somebody needs to set her straight.
Commander William T. Riker: I think I'll leave that to the Captain.
Counselor Troi: Coward.

Counselor Troi: [about her mother] She has decided to focus all her sexual energy on one male, who will, of course, eventually become her husband. It seems, Captain, that... you are the early favorite.
Commander William T. Riker: Congratulations, sir!

Lieutenant Worf: Captain, we are being hailed by a small transport vessel just coming into range.
Counselor Troi: [horrified] Oh, my god.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: What's the problem?
Counselor Troi: What's she doing here?
Wesley Crusher: On screen, captain.
Transporter Pilot: Starship Enterprise, come in.
Commander William T. Riker: We have you on viewer, pilot.
Transporter Pilot: Enterprise, I have a passenger, a VIP passenger who I more...
Lwaxana Troi: [shoving the pilot aside] Oh, let me talk to them. I'm sure I'm more articulate than that.
Counselor Troi: Mother.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Samaritan Snare (#2.17)" (1989)
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: The Pakleds seem pretty... sincere.
Pakled Captain Grebnedlog: We want what we want.
Commander William T. Riker: Our computer banks are non-negotiable.
Pakled Captain Grebnedlog: We want them.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Believe me, they're nothing if not... persistent.
Pakled Captain Grebnedlog: We want to be nothing if not persistent.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Nobody ever said they were great conversationalists.

Pakled Captain Grebnedlog: We are far from home.
Commander William T. Riker: Aren't we all?

Commander William T. Riker: What brings you so far from home?
Pakled Captain Grebnedlog: We look for things.
Commander William T. Riker: What were you looking for?
Pakled Captain Grebnedlog: Things we need.
Commander William T. Riker: Can you be more specific?
Pakled Captain Grebnedlog: Things that make us go. We need help.
Commander William T. Riker: What is the nature of your mission?
Pakled Captain Grebnedlog: We look for things.
Commander William T. Riker: [to La Forge] Did you hear an echo?

[Picard prepares to leave for Starbase 515 without giving a reason for his journey]
Commander William T. Riker: Forgive my saying so, sir, but you're being rather enigmatic.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Consider it Captain's privilege.
Commander William T. Riker: As First Officer, I have complete security clearance.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: This has nothing to do with ship's business, Number One. Suffice it to say, it is strictly a matter of... 'image'.

Wesley Crusher: Those Academy cadets can be extremely competitive.
Commander William T. Riker: But you have the practical experience, Wes.
Lt. Commander Data: Commander Riker is correct. While the information imparted to cadets at the Academy is unquestionably vital for prospective Starfleet officers, it nonetheless requires a significant period of supplementary systems training and situational disciplines.
Commander William T. Riker: Didn't I just say that?
Lt. Commander Data: Yes, sir. But not quite as perspicuously.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: All Good Things... (#7.25)" (1994)
Admiral William T. Riker: All right, let's get out of here.
Picard: No, Will, we can't! We have to save humanity!

[Riker's last line of the series]
Commander William T. Riker: Of course! Have a seat.

Lieutenant Worf: [in a poker round] Four hands in a row. How does he do it?
Commander William T. Riker: I cheat.
[Data looks up, suspicious]
Commander William T. Riker: I'm kidding!

Admiral William T. Riker: [about his relationship with Troi] I didn't want to admit that it was over. I always thought that we would get together again. And then she was gone. You think you have all the time in the world, until... Yeah...

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [Riker has just learned that Troi and Worf have begun a relationship] Will, this time-shifting, when it happens, I experience a momentary disorientation. If that should happen during a crisis, Will, I want you to take command immediately.
[Riker, glaring into space, is clearly not listening]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Number One?
Commander William T. Riker: [coming to himself] I'm sorry. Be prepared to take command, aye, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Speaking of disorientation, are *you* all right?
Commander William T. Riker: I'm just a little distracted. I'm fine.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Phantasms (#7.6)" (1993)
Commander William T. Riker: Something wrong, sir?
Capt. Picard: I just got a message from Starfleet Command.
Commander William T. Riker: Bad news?
Capt. Picard: You could say that. I've been invited to the annual Starfleet Admirals' banquet.
Commander William T. Riker: My condolences.
Capt. Picard: I've managed to avoid it for the past six years, but now it would seem that my luck has run out. I can't think of anything more tedious - fifty admirals shaking hands, making dull conversation, uninteresting food, boring speeches...
Commander William T. Riker: Can't you think of some excuse to get out of it?
Capt. Picard: After six years, Number One, I don't think I have any excuses left. Besides, I've been invited by Admiral Nakamura, the Sector Commander. He'd consider it an insult if I turned him down.
Commander William T. Riker: We could cause a diplomatic crisis. Take the ship into the Neutral Zone and attack the Romulans. That should get you out of the banquet.
Capt. Picard: I wouldn't count on it.

Admiral Nakamura: You're not trying to avoid this particular engagement, are you, Picard?
Capt. Picard: No, no, certainly not. I'm... really looking forward to it.
Admiral Nakamura: Good. I'll expect you soon. Nakamura out.
Commander William T. Riker: I think he's on to you, sir.

Lieutenant Worf: Ever since you gave Alexander that music program, he's been playing it all night. *Every* night!
Commander William T. Riker: Just wanted to broaden his horizons. Besides, he likes it.
Lieutenant Worf: It is screeching, pounding dissonance. It is not music.
Commander William T. Riker: Worf, It's better than music. It's jazz.

Commander William T. Riker: Will someone answer that damn ringing?

Commander William T. Riker: [after yet another warp drive failure] Talk about going nowhere fast.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Booby Trap (#3.6)" (1989)
Commander William T. Riker: If we resist, we die. If we don't resist... we die.

Commander William T. Riker: Computers have always impressed me with their ability to take orders. I'm not nearly as convinced of their ability to creatively give them.

Commander William T. Riker: Mr. La Forge, we need warp power now!
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: Matter-antimatter mixture ratio settings... at optimum balance. Reaction sequence... corresponding to specified norms. Magnetic plasma transfer to warp field generators per program specs. Commander, we should be going like a bat out of hell!

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [returning from the Promellian battle cruiser] Thrilling. That was... absolutely thrilling. And I was right, Number One. There were ghosts on board that old ship. One of them actually spoke to us.
Commander William T. Riker: A friendly one, I hope?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: My own counterpart - the Captain's final message, praising his crew.
Commander William T. Riker: I hope you'll be as thoughtful when the time comes.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Battle (#1.8)" (1987)
Kazago: The android was mentioned, too. What is its price? We should like to... purchase it.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: He is not for sale. Commander Data is, um... is, um...
Commander William T. Riker: ...is second-hand merchandise, and you wouldn't want him.

Commander William T. Riker: How was it, Captain?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Very strange, Number One. Like going back to the house you grew up in, but no one's home - except phantoms of the past.

Commander William T. Riker: I hope you're right, Data.
Lt. Commander Data: No question of it, sir.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Where is Bok?
Commander William T. Riker: Removed from command, sir, and placed under guard for his act of personal vengeance. Seems there was no profit in it.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: In revenge there never is.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Sarek (#3.23)" (1990)
[Sarek and his party have arrived on the Enterprise]
Commander William T. Riker: The way Mendrossen described him, I expected to see a frail old man.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I hope *I'm* that frail when I'm 202 years old.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [on Sarek] I met him once. Many years ago, very briefly at his son's wedding. I can tell you, that was quite a moment for a young lieutenant, standing in the presence of such history. I remember he spoke to me, and I just stood there grinning like an idiot.
Commander William T. Riker: You, tongue-tied?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Indeed. How do you make small talk with someone who shaped the Federation?

Commander William T. Riker: Is it my imagination, or have tempers become a little frayed on this ship lately?
Lieutenant Worf: I hadn't noticed.
[they enter Ten Forward, where a mass brawl is in full swing]
Lieutenant Worf: I see what you mean.

Commander William T. Riker: Is Captain Picard all right?
Ambassador Sarek: Don't worry, Number One.
Commander William T. Riker: And... the Ambassador?
Ambassador Sarek: I am myself again. It has been a long time.


Star Trek: Generations (1994)
Riker: Lieutenant Worf, the charges and specifications are one: Performing above and beyond the call of duty on countless occasions, and two, most seriously: Having earned the admiration and respect of the entire crew.
Picard: Mr. Worf, I hereby promote you to the rank of Lieutenant Commander, with all of the rights and privileges thereto. And may God have mercy on your soul.

Riker: I'm going to miss this ship; she went before her time.
Picard: Someone once told me that time was a predator that stalked us all our lives. But I rather believe than time is a companion who goes with us on the journey, and reminds us to cherish every moment because they'll never come again. What we leave behind is not as important how we lived. After all, Number One, we're only mortal.
Riker: [smiling] Speak for yourself, sir. I plan to live forever.

[last lines]
Riker: I always thought I'd get a shot at this chair one day.
Picard: Perhaps you still will... somehow I doubt this will be the last ship to carry the name "Enterprise".
[looks at Riker for a beat, then taps his combadge]
Picard: Picard to Farragut, two to beam up.
[the two men demateralize]

[Worf has fallen into the ocean, after Riker ordered the computer to remove the holographic plank]
Picard: Number One, that's *retract* plank, not *remove* plank.
Riker: Of course, sir.
[leans over the side towards Worf]
Riker: Sorry!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Q Who (#2.16)" (1989)
Q: My purpose is to join you.
Commander William T. Riker: To join us as what?
Q: As a member of the crew, willing and able, ready to serve. This ship is already home for the indigent, the unwanted, the unworthy. Why not for a homeless entity?
Commander William T. Riker: Homeless?
Q: Yes.
Commander William T. Riker: The other members of the Q Continuum kicked you out?

[Riker prepares to beam over to the Borg ship with an away team]
Guinan: I wouldn't go there if I were you.
Commander William T. Riker: I don't know, Guinan. They paid us a visit; it seems only fair that we return the courtesy.

[after transporting to the Borg vessel, Riker, Data and Worf come across a nursery of Borg children]
Commander William T. Riker: [communicating with Picard] From the look of it, the Borg are born as a biological life form. It seems that almost immediately after birth, they begin artificial implants. Apparently, the Borg have developed the technology to link artificial intelligence directly into the humanoid brain. Astounding.

Commander William T. Riker: [of the Borg] They're carving us up like a roast.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Perfect Mate (#5.21)" (1992)
Commander William T. Riker: Mr. Worf, escort our Ferengi guests to quarters - not too close to mine.

Kamala: My body is producing an unusually elevated level of what you would call pheromones. The effect can be quite provocative; perhaps you sense it.
Commander William T. Riker: [uneasily] Aah... Unfortunately I'm not an empath.
Kamala: Oh, I think you're more empathic than you admit. At least when it comes to women.
Commander William T. Riker: I think you have me at a disadvantage.

Commander William T. Riker: This has been very educational. But I make it a policy never to open another man's gift.
Kamala: I know my role in history, Commander. But it's gonna be a long voyage.

Commander William T. Riker: [aroused from his encounter with Kamala] Riker to bridge, if you need me, I'll be in holodeck 4.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Justice (#1.7)" (1987)
Commander William T. Riker: When in Rome, eh?
Lieutenant Worf: When where, sir?

Lieutenant Worf: I am not concerned with pleasure, Commander. I am a warrior.
Commander William T. Riker: Even Klingons need love now and then.
Lieutenant Worf: For what we consider love, sir, I would need a Klingon woman.
Commander William T. Riker: What about plain old basic sex? You must have some need for that.
Lieutenant Worf: Of course. But with the females available to me, sir - Earth females - I must restrain myself too much. They are quite fragile, sir.

Commander William T. Riker: Short and sweet. God-like efficiency.

Commander William T. Riker: When has justice ever been as simple as a rulebook?
[the transporter activates, and the away team is beamed up]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Seems the Edo Lord agrees with you, Number One.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Neutral Zone (#1.25)" (1988)
[several Federation and Romulan outposts along the Neutral Zone have been destroyed]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [to the Romulans] Who is responsible?
[the Romulans look at each other]
Ralph Offenhouse: They haven't got a clue! They're hoping *you* know; but they're too arrogant to ask!
Commander William T. Riker: You're out of line, Mister!
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Yes. But it's a correct assessment.

Lt. Commander Data: They are the most unusual humans I have ever encountered.
Commander William T. Riker: Well, from what I've seen of our guests, there's not much to redeem them. Makes one wonder how our species survived the 21st century.

Commander William T. Riker: [about the 20th-century Humans] Having them on board is like a visit from the past.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: That would take us in the wrong direction. Our mission is to go forward - and it's just begun.

L. Q. 'Sonny' Clemonds: Let's see if the Braves are on, how do you cut on this teevee?
Commander William T. Riker: Teevee?
L. Q. 'Sonny' Clemonds: Yeah, the boob tube. Uh, I'd like to see how the Braves are doing after all this time. Probably still finding ways to lose.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Outrageous Okona (#2.4)" (1988)
Commander William T. Riker: Mr. Okona appears to have excellent vision - as well as a healthy libido.

Lieutenant Worf: Captain! They're now locking lasers on us.
Commander William T. Riker: Lasers?
Lieutenant Worf: Yes, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Lasers can't even penetrate our navigation shields, don't they know that?
Commander William T. Riker: Regulations... do call for yellow alert.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Hm... Very old regulation. Well, make it so, Number One. And reduce speed. Drop main shields as well.
Commander William T. Riker: May I ask why, sir?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: In case we decide to surrender to them, Number One.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Now, please follow Commander Riker's instructions so our ship can get back to its normal routine.
Capt. Thadiun Okona: Whatever you say, Captain.
[Riker grins]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Something funny?
Commander William T. Riker: Well, the unexpected *is* our normal routine.

Wesley Crusher: Say goodbye, Data.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Goodbye, Data.
[crew laughs]
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Was that funny?
Wesley Crusher: [laughs]
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Accessing. Ah! Burns and Allen, Roxy Theater, New York City, 1932. It still works.
[pauses]
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Then there was the one about the girl in the nudist colony, that nothing looked good on?
Lieutenant Worf: We're ready to get under way, sir.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Take my Worf, please.
Commander William T. Riker: [to Captain Picard] Warp speed, sir?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Please.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: A Matter of Perspective (#3.14)" (1990)
[Troi explains to Riker that Manua Apgar hasn't been lying during her account of events]
Commander William T. Riker: We can't both be telling the truth.
Counselor Deanna Troi: It is the truth as each of you remembers it.
Commander William T. Riker: But her version puts a noose around my neck.

[O'Brien has beamed Riker back from the research station]
Chief Miles O'Brien: Transporter room to bridge. He's aboard.
Commander William T. Riker: Why do you sound so surprised, Mr. O'Brien?
Chief Miles O'Brien: Well, for a moment, we weren't sure you left the space station in time.
Commander William T. Riker: In time for what?
Chief Miles O'Brien: It just exploded, sir.

Commander William T. Riker: [Manua's version of Riker, as he tries to force himself on her] A princess in a very high tower.

Commander William T. Riker: [Manua claims Riker assaulted her in a Holodeck simulation] This isn't me. I wasn't the one who closed the door. I didn't proposition her and I certainly didn't try to rape her.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Legacy (#4.6)" (1990)
Commander William T. Riker: Data, have you got a flush or a full house?
Lt. Commander Data: It will cost you twenty to make that determination, sir.

[last lines]
Commander William T. Riker: In all trust, there is the possibility of betrayal. I'm not sure you were... prepared for that.
Lt. Commander Data: Were you prepared, sir?
Commander William T. Riker: I don't think anybody ever is.
Lt. Commander Data: Hm... Then it is better not to trust?
Commander William T. Riker: Without trust, there's no friendship, no closeness. None of the emotional bonds that make us who we are.
Lt. Commander Data: And yet you put yourself at risk.
Commander William T. Riker: Every single time.
Lt. Commander Data: Perhaps I am fortunate, sir, to be spared the emotional consequences.
Commander William T. Riker: Perhaps.

Commander William T. Riker: [of the phaser that Ishara Yar has used against Data] Set to kill.

Commander William T. Riker: Data, what's on your mind?
Lt. Commander Data: Recent events have left me puzzled, sir. It has been days since Ishara left, and yet my thoughts seem to dwell on her. Almost as if I were experiencing a feedback loop in my mnemonic network.
Commander William T. Riker: I know what you mean.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Enemy (#3.7)" (1989)
[O'Brien is trying to get a lock on La Forge, who has gone missing on a stormy planet]
Chief Miles O'Brien: The electrical storm's creating thousands of ghosts.
Commander William T. Riker: Well, beam some of those ghosts back; one of them may be Geordi!

Lieutenant Worf: I am asked to give up the very lifeblood of my mother and my father to those who murdered them!
Commander William T. Riker: So you blame all Romulans for that?
Lieutenant Worf: Yes!
Commander William T. Riker: Forever? What if someday, the Federation made peace with the Romulans?
Lieutenant Worf: Impossible.
Commander William T. Riker: That's what your people said a few years ago, about Humans. Think how many died on both sides in that war. Would you and I be here now like this, if we hadn't been able to let go of the anger and the blame? Where does it end, Worf? If that Romulan dies... does his family carry the bitterness on another generation?

[the crew are debating the recent intrusion of a Romulan ship in Federation space]
Commander William T. Riker: It obviously wasn't pilot's error. I think it demands a response from us.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: But we must measure our response carefully, or history may remember Galorndon Core along with... Pearl Harbor, and Station Salem One, as the stage for a bloody preamble to war.

[last lines]
Commander William T. Riker: Close call.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Too close, Number One. Brinkmanship is a dangerous game.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Qpid (#4.20)" (1991)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I think this is supposed to be Earth - somewhere... round about the twelfth century. And this is England, or to be more precise, Sherwood Forest; at least Q's recreation of it.
Commander William T. Riker: That would explain these costumes.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Quite right, Number One - or... should I say 'John Little'?
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Well, if he's Little John, that makes you...
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I know. Robin Hood.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I've just been paid a visit from Q.
Commander William T. Riker: Q? Any idea what he's up to?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: He wants to do something "nice" for me.
Commander William T. Riker: I'll alert the crew.

Commander William T. Riker: Eternity never looked so lovely.

Vash: You must be Commander Riker.
Commander William T. Riker: I'm afraid you have me at a disadvantage.
Vash: I didn't mean to interrupt. I believe you were about to tell me that my eyes are as mysterious as the stars.
Commander William T. Riker: You're Betazoid.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Disaster (#5.5)" (1991)
Lt. Commander Data: My positronic brain has several layers of shielding to protect me from power surges. It would be possible for you to remove my cranial unit and take it with you.
Commander William T. Riker: Let me get this straight. You want me to take off your head?
Lt. Commander Data: Yes, sir. Is something wrong, sir?

Commander William T. Riker: [trying to create a link between Data's head and the computer] You need a bigger head.

[last lines]
Capt. Picard: You have the bridge, Number One.
Marissa Flores, Commander William T. Riker: Aye, sir.

Commander William T. Riker: You just can't stay away from the big chair, can you?
Counselor Troi: I don't think I'm cut out to be Captain. First Officer, maybe. I understand there aren't many qualifications.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: We'll Always Have Paris (#1.23)" (1988)
Commander William T. Riker: [about the time distortion] The captain of the Lalo described it as a hiccough.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Hiccough?
Lt. Commander Data: Actually, sir, that may be an incorrect analogy.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: How so, Data?
Lt. Commander Data: A hiccough is a spasmatic inhalation with closure of the glottis, accompanied by a peculiar sound. If we were to continue this analogy to a body function, what occurred would be best represented by...
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Enough, Data.

[in another time distortion, Picard, Riker and Data, inside a turbolift, come face to face with themselves outside the turbolift]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [inside turbolift] It's us before we stepped into the turbolift.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [outside lift] It's happening again.
Lt. Commander Data: [outside] I feel no disorientation.
Lt. Commander Data: [inside] Nor do I.
[doors of turbolift are closing, leaving the outside crew alone in the corridor]
Commander William T. Riker: What was that?
Lt. Commander Data: I believe what could be termed as the Manheim Effect is becoming more pronounced.
Commander William T. Riker: This is where we started. If we are us...
Lt. Commander Data: Oh, we are us, sir. But they are also us. So indeed - we are both us...

Commander William T. Riker: [after an unsuccessful beaming attempt] What are we doing back here?
Chief Herbert: You're lucky you made it back at all, sir.

[last lines]
Commander William T. Riker: I've only been there once, but they've got this great club - I don't remember the name of it; they serve those blue concoctions.
Counselor Deanna Troi: It's across the square from the Zanza Men's Dance Palace.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: It's called the Blue Parrot Cafe. And you're buying.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Lower Decks (#7.15)" (1994)
[Riker and Troi are discussing crew evaluations]
Commander William T. Riker: Why don't we just give everybody a promotion and call it a night - 'Commander'?
Counselor Deanna Troi: Fine with me, 'Captain'.

Commander William T. Riker: I am your worst nightmare!

Sam Lavelle: My grandfather was Canadian, you know.
Commander William T. Riker: Really?
Sam Lavelle: Aren't you one too?
Commander William T. Riker: [confused] A grandfather?
Sam Lavelle: [laughs nervously] No, Canadian, sir, Canadian.
Commander William T. Riker: No, I grew up in Alaska.
Sam Lavelle: Oh. Well, they both... get a lot of snow.

[in a poker round]
Counselor Deanna Troi: It seems to me that you and Lavelle are a lot alike.
Commander William T. Riker: What? We're not at all alike!
Doctor Beverly Crusher: You're bluffing.
[in another poker round]
Sam Lavelle: You think so?
Ben: Yes. And I'm not gonna let you get away with it.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Defector (#3.10)" (1990)
Commander William T. Riker: [as the Enterprise approaches a suspected Romulan base] I don't like it. I would've expected a greeting party.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: You echo another noteworthy commander in similar circumstances, Number One. A countryman of yours - George Armstrong Custer, when his Seventh Cavalry arrived at the Little Big Horn.
Commander William T. Riker: May we have better luck.

Admiral Jarok: How do you allow Klingon pahtk to walk around in a Starfleet uniform?
Lieutenant Worf: You are lucky this is not a Klingon ship. We know how to deal with spies.
Admiral Jarok: Remove this tohzah from my sight!
Commander William T. Riker: Your knowledge of Klingon curses is impressive. But as a Romulan might say, only a veruul would use such language in public.

[last lines]
[Admiral Jarok has committed suicide]
Commander William T. Riker: [handing a data PADD to Picard] A letter to his wife and daughter.
Lt. Commander Data: Sir, he must have known it would be impossible for us to deliver it.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Today, perhaps. But if there are others with the courage of Admiral Jarok, we may hope to see a day of peace when... we can take his letter home.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Vengeance Factor (#3.9)" (1989)
[Dr. Crusher has isolated a microvirus from Volnoth's body]
Doctor Beverly Crusher: This microvirus will only attach itself to cells with a very specific DNA sequence.
Commander William T. Riker: How specific?
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Without knowing more about their genetic makeup, I can't be sure. But my guess is, this virus would only kill one Acamarian in a million.
Commander William T. Riker: Pretty single-minded bug.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Too single-minded. I can't believe it's a naturally occuring virus.
Commander William T. Riker: Meaning someone engineered it?
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Meaning Volnoth was murdered.

Yuta: As... the Sovereign has no further need for my services this evening, she suggested I might spend some time with you.
Commander William T. Riker: What a charming suggestion.

Commander William T. Riker: The wars are over, Yuta.
Yuta: You cannot understand.
Commander William T. Riker: You're right, I can't. Because I've seen the part of you that regrets what you've become.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Brothers (#4.3)" (1990)
Commander William T. Riker: The only way we knew we'd come out of warp was by looking out a window.

Commander William T. Riker: The computer should think all three of us are Data. I just hope we don't all beam back *looking* like Data.

Lt. Commander Data: [Data has commandeered the bridge and driven the rest of the crew out. Riker and Worf are attempting to regain access through a Jefferies tube] Computer: configure a perimeter field charge, Sections 9K through 12T.
Commander William T. Riker: [the field charge takes effect] What the hell was that?
Lieutenant Worf: He's activated a force field, sir.
Commander William T. Riker: Great. Just great.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Masks (#7.17)" (1994)
Commander William T. Riker: [on the bridge] Maybe we better talk out here; the observation lounge has turned into a swamp.

[first lines]
Counselor Deanna Troi: How's it going, Data?
Lt. Cmdr. Data: I have finished. The dimensions are accurate to within 1.3%.
Counselor Deanna Troi: I'm sure they are.
[pause]
Counselor Deanna Troi: Data, you obviously don't have a problem with realism. But, you're here to work on your imagination. Maybe you should try something a little more... abstract. Here.
[takes his work from the table]
Counselor Deanna Troi: I want you to start a new piece. I'd like you to sculpt...
[sighs]
Counselor Deanna Troi: Music.
Counselor Deanna Troi, Lt. Cmdr. Data: Counselor, music is a collection of acoustic vibrations. How can I reproduce a sound with clay?
Counselor Deanna Troi: Well, think of the effects that sounds have on people. The images that music brings to your mind. And then give it a form.
[Data makes some faces and behinds constructing at a high speed and Deanna's face changes to one not of approval as he finishes a treble clef and he looks at her with a small smile]
Counselor Deanna Troi: [smiles] It's a start.
Commander William T. Riker: [over communicator] Riker to Data. Please report to the bridge.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Acknowledged, Sir. On my way.

Lt. Cmdr. Data: Based on its present trajectory, the comet appears to have originated in the D'Arsay system.
Commander William T. Riker: That's over 2 sectors away.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: That is correct, Sir.
[camera pans to Data and to his side]
Lt. Cmdr. Data: This object has been en route for 87 million years.
Commander William T. Riker: [looks to Picard] That's a long time alone in the dark.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Hmm.
[hesitates]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Begin a full sensor analysis, Mr. Data, and log the findings with the Federation Astrophysical Survey.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Aye, Sir.
[short pause]
Lt. Cmdr. Data: The comet's outer shell is composed primarily of gaseous hydrogen and helium surrounding an icy mantle. The inner core consists of heavier elements.
[a bright light illuminates them and the bridge for a few seconds and vanishes]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: What was that?
Lt. Cmdr. Data: There is a distortion within the comet's inner core. I believe we experienced an intense sensor echo.
Commander William T. Riker: Can you correct for it?
Lt. Cmdr. Data: I'm attempting to do so now, Sir. I have compensated for the effect. Sensors are reconfigured for a low-intensity sweep. We are still picking up some interference, but the distortion is manageable. At these settings, the scan will be complete in 39 hours.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Who Watches the Watchers (#3.4)" (1989)
Counselor Deanna Troi: Mintakan emotions are quite interesting. Like the Vulcans, they have highly ordered minds. A very sensible people. For example, Mintakan women precede their mates. It's a signal to other women.
Commander William T. Riker: "This man's taken, get your own"?
Counselor Deanna Troi: Not precisely. More like, "If you want his services, I'm the one you have to negotiate with".
Commander William T. Riker: What kind of services?
Counselor Deanna Troi: All kinds.
Commander William T. Riker: They *are* a sensible race.

Commander William T. Riker: [to Picard] It's worse than we suspected. The Mintakans are beginning to believe in a god. And the one they've chosen... is you.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Dr. Barron, I cannot, I *will not* impose a set of commandments on these people. To do so violates the very essence of the Prime Directive!
Dr. Barron: Like it or not, we have rekindled the Mintakans' belief in the Overseer.
Commander William T. Riker: And are you saying that this belief will eventually become a religion?
Dr. Barron: It's inevitable. And without guidance, that religion could degenerate into inquisitions, holy wars, chaos.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Horrifying. Dr. Barron, your report describes how rational these people are. Millennia ago, they abandoned their belief in the supernatural. Now you are asking me to sabotage that achievement, to send them back into the dark ages of superstition and ignorance and fear? NO!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Descent: Part 1 (#6.26)" (1993)
Commander William T. Riker: Data? Data, are you all right?
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Yes, sir.
Commander William T. Riker: What happened?
Lt. Cmdr. Data: I got angry...

Commander William T. Riker: [about the Borg encountered on Ohniaka III] They were fast, aggressive, almost vicious. It was more like fighting Klingons than... Borg.
Commander William T. Riker: [to Worf] No offense.
Lieutenant Worf: None taken.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: He was here in this room, Will. I could have rid the Federation of a mortal threat, and I let him go.
Commander William T. Riker: Sending Hugh back to the Borg was a very risky... a very dangerous choice. But it was the moral thing to do.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Well, it may turn out that the moral thing to do was not the right thing to do.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Violations (#5.12)" (1992)
[from Troi's traumatic memory]
Commander William T. Riker, Jev: [respectively] Have you stopped thinking about us?

Commander William T. Riker: [to a comatose Deanna] I miss you. Please don't stay away too long.

Commander William T. Riker: I just thought... it might help to hear a friendly voice - even if you don't know you're hearing it.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Relics (#6.4)" (1992)
Commander William T. Riker: Could someone survive inside a transporter buffer for 75 years?
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: I know a way to find out.

Commander William T. Riker: This looks like the front door. Should we ring the bell?

Commander William T. Riker: [of the shuttle that Picard has given Scotty "on extended loan"] She's not much to look at.
Scotty: [grinning] Laddie, every woman has her own charm; ye just have to know where to look for it.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Conspiracy (#1.24)" (1988)
[Admiral Quinn is eager to show Riker an unknown "superior form of life"]
Commander William T. Riker: I think I'll summon my Science Officer.
Admiral Gregory Quinn: [grabs Riker's arm] It won't like your Science Officer. It does like *you*!

Commander William T. Riker: [to Picard] You'll be one of us soon!

Lt. Cmdr. Data: [Data is working one of the aft science stations after the Enterprise has been suddenly diverted to the planet Dytallix B] Commander, I have the readout on Dytallix B.
Commander William T. Riker: Go ahead.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Dytallix B is the fifth of six planets circling the red giant known as Mira. One side faces the sun where temperatures reach up to 180 degrees Celsius. The mines line the temperate zone between the day and night zones, but they are long abandoned.
Commander William T. Riker: Why the devil would we be going to this place? Are there any lifeforms indigenous to the planet?
Lt. Cmdr. Data: I believe the answer to both questions is no, Sir. In a manner of speaking, it is nothing more than a lifeless hunk of rock, a useless ball of mud, a worthless chunk of...
Commander William T. Riker: [interrupting] Thankyou Data. I get the idea.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Emissary (#2.20)" (1989)
[in a poker round, Riker seems unsure about how to proceed]
Doctor Pulaski: 50 is the bet. What's the matter? Your feet getting cold?
Commander William T. Riker: My cards are getting cold.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I've never before seen the Lieutenant so... unsettled.
Commander William T. Riker: The Iceman's finally melting.

[after Worf has temporarily played "Captain" of the Enterprise]
Commander William T. Riker: How did you like command?
Lieutenant Worf: Comfortable chair.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Gambit: Part 2 (#7.5)" (1993)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [as Galen] What's wrong, Commander? You're having second thoughts about betraying your comrades? Because that's what you've done - betrayed them. Betrayed them in order to save yourself. You used to be just a second-rate officer. Now you're a traitor and a coward. How does that feel?
[Riker whirls around and punches Picard in the face]
Commander William T. Riker: I don't know, how did *that* feel?

[Picard is startled by Riker, who is entering the room, and almost shoots him]
Commander William T. Riker: Good to see you too.

[last lines]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Number One, will you set a course for Starbase 227, I'll join you on the bridge shortly.
Commander William T. Riker: Wait a minute - you've been declared dead. You can't give orders around here.
Lt. Commander Data: [to Riker] If we are to adhere to the exact letter of Starfleet regulations, then technically, sir, you have been declared a renegade. In fact, I believe you are facing twelve counts of court martial offenses. You cannot give orders either, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: That's quite right. And as I am supposed to be dead, I'll go and get some sleep, and Mr. Data, I suggest that you escort Commander Riker to the brig.
Lt. Commander Data: Aye, sir.
[while Picard enters his quarters, an amused Riker starts to go about his own business, when Data holds him back... ]
Lt. Commander Data: This way, sir.
[... and, unperturbed, leads him away in the opposite direction]
Commander William T. Riker: Data, he was joking... You know that, right? Data?


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Data's Day (#4.11)" (1991)
Commander William T. Riker: Charming woman!
Lt. Commander Data: [voice-over] The tone of Commander Riker's voice makes me suspect that he is not serious about finding Ambassador T'Pel charming. My experience suggests that in fact he may mean the exact opposite of what he says. Irony is a form of expression I have not yet been able to master.

Commander William T. Riker: Some days you get the bear and some days the bear gets you.

[from Riker's joke as told by him to the officers on the bridge, and enhanced with the scripted version]
Commander William T. Riker: ...He still won't talk. So they put the count's head on the chopping block. "One more chance", says the queen. "No", says the count. Then, just as the headsman swings the axe and the blade is about to fall, the count says, "Wait, wait! I'll talk!" But too late. And the moral to the story? Never hatchet your counts before they chicken.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Measure of a Man (#2.9)" (1989)
[Riker is doing his duty in the courtroom]
Commander William T. Riker: The Commander is a physical representation of a dream - an idea, conceived of by the mind of a man. Its purpose: to serve human needs and interests. It's a collection of neural nets and heuristic algorithms; its responses dictated by an elaborate software written by a man, its hardware built by a man. And now... and now a man will shut it off.
[Riker switches off Data, who slumps forward like a lifeless puppet]
Commander William T. Riker: Pinocchio is broken. Its strings have been cut.

Captain Phillipa Louvois: I can use serving officers as legal counsel. You, as the senior officer, would defend.
Capt. Picard: Very good.
Captain Phillipa Louvois: And the unenviable task of prosecuting this case would fall on you, Commander, as the next most senior officer of the defendant's ship.
Commander William T. Riker: I can't. I won't. Data's my comrade. We have served together. I not only respect him, I consider him my friend.
Captain Phillipa Louvois: When people of good conscience have an honest dispute, we must still sometimes resort to this kind of adversarial system.
Commander William T. Riker: You just want me to prove that Data is a mere machine. I can't do that, because I don't believe it. I happen to know better, so I am neither qualified nor willing. You're going to have to find someone else.
Captain Phillipa Louvois: Then I will rule summarily based on my findings. Data is a toaster. Have him report immediately to Commander Maddox for experimental refit.

Lt. Commander Data: Sir, there is a celebration on the Holodeck.
Commander William T. Riker: I have no right to be there.
Lt. Commander Data: Because you failed in your task?
Commander William T. Riker: No, God, no. I came that close to winning, Data.
Lt. Commander Data: Yes, sir.
Commander William T. Riker: I almost cost you your life!
Lt. Commander Data: Is it not true that had you refused to prosecute, Captain Louvois would have ruled summarily against me?
Commander William T. Riker: Yes.
Lt. Commander Data: That action injured you, and saved me. I will not forget it.
Commander William T. Riker: You're a wise man, my friend.
Lt. Commander Data: Not yet, sir. But with your help, I am learning.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Arsenal of Freedom (#1.20)" (1988)
Captain Paul Rice: Who sent you here to look for me?
Commander William T. Riker: Your mother. She's worried about you.

Captain Paul Rice: Tell me about your ship, Riker. It's the Enterprise, isn't it?
Commander William T. Riker: No, the name of my ship is the Lollipop.
Captain Paul Rice: I have no knowledge of that ship.
Commander William T. Riker: It's just been commissioned. It's a good ship.

[Riker and Yar are faced with the imminent threat of a deadly weapon]
Lieutenant Tasha Yar: We could split up.
Commander William T. Riker: What good would that do?
Lieutenant Tasha Yar: Confuse it, delay it, something.
Commander William T. Riker: It would still get us; it would just take a little longer.
Lieutenant Tasha Yar: It might give one of us time to get out of range.
Commander William T. Riker: Out of *range*?
Lieutenant Tasha Yar: Forget I said it. These devices wiped out an entire planet. I don't think it has a range.
Commander William T. Riker: Then what does that leave us?
[Yar bites her lip]
Commander William T. Riker: Right. That's what I thought.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Masterpiece Society (#5.13)" (1992)
Commander William T. Riker: We've got a problem. Our core fragment is going to pass by Moab IV in six days.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Isn't that exactly what we anticipated?
Commander William T. Riker: We didn't anticipate there would be someone living there.

Aaron Conor: We grow up knowing exactly what our society needs from us; what we are expected to do.
Commander William T. Riker: That must take some of the fun out of it.
Aaron Conor: Not at all. My entire psychological makeup tells me that I was born to lead. I am exactly what I would choose to be. Think of it another way: are there still people in your society who have not yet discovered who they really are or what they were meant to do with their lives? They may be in the wrong job. They may be writing bad poetry. Or worse yet, they may be great poets working as laborers, never to be discovered. That does not happen here.

[last lines]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: If ever we needed reminding of the importance of the Prime Directive, it is now.
Commander William T. Riker: The Prime Directive doesn't apply. They're Human.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Doesn't it? Our very presence may have damaged, even destroyed their way of life. Now, whether or not we agree with that way of life, whether they're Human or not, is irrelevant, Number One. We are responsible.
Commander William T. Riker: We had to respond to the threat of the core fragment, didn't we?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Of course we did. But in the end, we may have proved just as dangerous to that colony as any core fragment could ever have been.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Too Short a Season (#1.15)" (1988)
Commander William T. Riker: What I don't understand, sir, is how Karnas knew that you were still... available.
Admiral Mark Jameson: Still alive, you mean.

[Jameson is suffering from the agonizing effects of the drug]
Commander William T. Riker: The Admiral?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Sickbay. 'Not good' is a galactic understatement.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: The quest for youth, Number One - so futile. Age and wisdom have their graces, too.
Commander William T. Riker: I wonder if one doesn't have to have age and wisdom to appreciate that, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I hope not, Number One.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Firstborn (#7.21)" (1994)
Commander William T. Riker: Quark! I see you remember me.
Quark: How could I forget the only man ever to win triple-down dabo on one of my tables?
Commander William T. Riker: And how could I forget that you didn't have enough latinum to cover my winnings?

K'Mtar: [about Quark] Could not he have been lying?
Commander William T. Riker: Why would he? I'd just be knocking on his door again in a few days, and I wouldn't be in as good a mood.

Commander William T. Riker: We know you're dealing in stolen ore. But I wanna talk about the assassination attempt on Lieutenant Worf.
B'Etor: What assassination attempt? This is the first I've heard of it.
Lursa: Too bad it didn't succeed!
[laughs maliciously]


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Nth Degree (#4.19)" (1991)
Commander William T. Riker: [after Barclay has managed to raise the shield strength by 300%] Mr. Barclay! Everyone's still trying to figure out exactly how you did it.
Barclay: Well, it... it just occurred to me that I could set up a frequency harmonic between the deflector and the shield grid, using the warp field generator as a power flow anti-attenuator, and that, of course, naturally created an amplification of the inherent energy output.
Commander William T. Riker: [clueless] U-huh, I see that...

Doctor Beverly Crusher: He taught violin technique at the music school last night.
Commander William T. Riker: I didn't know Barclay played the violin.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: He didn't. Not until last night.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: The question is, how're we going to deal with it?
Commander William T. Riker: We could confine him to his quarters.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: How can we do that? What's he done? I mean, we're talking about locking a man up for being too smart.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Man of the People (#6.3)" (1992)
Commander William T. Riker: Hi. It's that time again... The dreaded crew evaluation reports?
Counselor Deanna Troi: [groans] Does it have to be today?
Commander William T. Riker: It's not going to be any easier tomorrow.
Counselor Deanna Troi: [more hoping than convinced] It might.

Commander William T. Riker: I'm closer to Deanna than I've ever been to anyone, but last night, she was someone that I had never seen before.

[last lines]
Counselor Deanna Troi: Looking back on the past few days, it's as though I'm looking at a holodeck projection... of someone else.
Commander William T. Riker: That's how it seemed to all of us.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Thanks for sticking by me.
Commander William T. Riker: I always will... even when you're old and gray.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Ensigns of Command (#3.2)" (1989)
[Data has been assigned to organize the evacuation of a Human colony on Tau Cygna V, a Sheliak planet]
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Sir, if I do not succeed, how violent is the Sheliak reaction likely to be?
Commander William T. Riker: The treaty is the only thing that prevented them from eradicating the colony the moment they discovered it.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Ah.
Commander William T. Riker: "Ah" is right, Data.

Commander William T. Riker: Gentlemen, we're giving you an assignment. The one thing we don't want to hear is that it's impossible.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I need the transporters to function, despite the hyperonic radiation.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: Yeah, but that's imp... Yes, sir.

[Picard has trapped the Sheliak in their own contract]
Commander William T. Riker: You enjoyed that.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: You're damned right.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Sins of the Father (#3.17)" (1990)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: One of the aims of the exchange program, Commander, is for us all to learn tolerance. As for my crew, it may be healthy to shake up the status quo occasionally.
Commander William T. Riker: The Commander certainly appears to have the crew on its toes, sir.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: And then some...
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: [to Kurn] No offense, sir.
Kurn: None taken. I never kill anyone at the supper table, Mr. La Forge.

Commander William T. Riker: I would like to make one suggestion, sir.
Kurn: A suggestion?
Commander William T. Riker: When I served aboard the Pagh, the hardest part for me was recognizing and adapting to the demands of the crew. They needed an iron hand. I imagine it must be very difficult for you to work with a crew that is... so different. I would be happy to guide you in that regard, if it would be helpful.
Kurn: No, Commander. It wouldn't.
[they leave the turbolift]
Commander William T. Riker: This is not a Klingon ship, sir!
Kurn: No, Commander, it is not. If it were a Klingon ship, I would've killed you for offering your suggestion.

Commander William T. Riker: One does not patronize a Klingon warrior.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Bonding (#3.5)" (1989)
[the mother of Jeremy, a little boy, has died in an away mission]
Commander William T. Riker: Do you know Jeremy well?
Wesley Crusher: [shakes his head] But I know what this is gonna be like for him.
Commander William T. Riker: That's part of life in Starfleet, Wesley.
Wesley Crusher: I know. They're very careful to prepare us for anything. But still...
Commander William T. Riker: I know.
Wesley Crusher: How do you get used to it? The telling them?
Commander William T. Riker: You hope you never do.

Lt. Commander Data: Since her death, I have been asked several times to define how well I knew Lieutenant Aster. And I heard you ask Wesley on the bridge how well he knew Jeremy. Does the question of familiarity have some bearing on death?
Commander William T. Riker: Do you remember how we all felt when Tasha died?
Lt. Commander Data: I do not sense the same feelings of absence that I associate with Lieutenant Yar. Although I cannot say precisely why.
Commander William T. Riker: Just human nature, Data.
Lt. Commander Data: Human nature, sir?
Commander William T. Riker: We feel a loss more intensely when it's a friend.
Lt. Commander Data: Hm... But should not the feelings run just as deep, regardless of who has died?
Commander William T. Riker: Maybe they should, Data. Maybe if we felt any loss as keenly as we felt the death of one close to us - human history would be a lot less bloody.

Commander William T. Riker: [of the energy life form] She offers him everything. All we can offer is the cold reality of his mother's death.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: What would you choose? If somebody came along and offered to give you back your mother, father or husband - would any of us say no so easily?


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: I Borg (#5.23)" (1992)
[an away team has found a badly injured Borg on a moon]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Away team, prepare to return to the ship!
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Captain, we can't leave him here, he won't survive.
Commander William T. Riker: I think the Captain understands that.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: I don't.

Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: If this works the way I think it will, once the invasive program starts spreading, it'll only be a matter of months before the Borg suffer total systems failure.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Comments?
Doctor Beverly Crusher: A question. What exactly is "total systems failure"?
Lt. Commander Data: The Borg are extremely computer-dependent. A systems failure will destroy them.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: I just think we should be clear about that. We're talking about annihilating an entire race.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Which under most circumstances would be unconscionable. But as I see it, the Borg leave us with little choice.
Commander William T. Riker: I agree. We're at war.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: There's been no formal declaration of war.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Not from us, but certainly from them. They've attacked us at every encounter.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: They've declared war on our way of life. We're to be assimilated.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: But even in war, there are rules. You don't kill civilians indiscriminately.
Commander William T. Riker: There are no civilians among the Borg.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Think of them as a single collective being. There's no one Borg who is more an individual than your arm or your leg.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: How convenient.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Your point, Doctor?
Doctor Beverly Crusher: When I look at my patient, I don't see a collective consciousness, I don't see a hive. I see a living, breathing boy who has been hurt and who needs our help. And we're talking about sending him back to his people as an instrument of destruction.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: It comes down to this: we're faced with an enemy who are determined to destroy us, and we have no hope of negotiating a peace. Unless that changes, we're justified in doing anything we can to survive.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Schisms (#6.5)" (1992)
[on the holodeck, several crew members are recreating the room, its equipment and instruments from their visions step by step]
Counselor Deanna Troi: All right. You were lying on the table. You had a bright light shining in your eyes. Were there any smells in the room? Were there any sounds?
Commander William T. Riker: Yes. Yes, there was a sound. Computer, there were noises, coming from the darkness. Strange. Like whispering.
[the computer creates a rustling sound]
Kaminer: More like clicks. Clicking sounds.
[the computer changes to a single clicking]
Commander William T. Riker: Louder.
[more clicks can be heard]
Commander William T. Riker: Faster... More of them...
[the computer ends up producing a continuous, eerie clatter]
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: I've been in this room before.
Commander William T. Riker: We've all been here before.

[last lines]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Have we any idea what came through the rupture before we were able to shut it down?
Lt. Cmdr. Data: No, sir. We were unable to track it once it left the cargo bay.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: Maybe it was a probe of some kind.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Possibly they were simply curious, explorers, like ourselves.
Commander William T. Riker: Ensign Rager and I were lucky to have escaped. Lieutenant Hagler is dead. Whoever it was that sent that thing was more than simply curious.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Ménage à Troi (#3.24)" (1990)
Commander William T. Riker: DaiMon Tog, I thought the Krayton left orbit hours ago.
DaiMon Tog: It did. But when I tried to get the image of Lwaxana Troi out of mind, I could not succeed.
[gives Lwaxana flowers]
Lwaxana Troi: [takes them and tosses them over her shoulder] This is ludicrous. You mean, you came all the way back to Betazed for me?

Commander William T. Riker: Those Ferengi have iron jaws.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Most Toys (#3.22)" (1990)
[after being beamed aboard, Data hands over a weapon to Riker]
Lt. Commander Data: A Varon-T disrupter. It belongs to Fajo.
Commander William T. Riker: Mr. O'Brien says the weapon was in a state of discharge.
Lt. Commander Data: [with an unreadable poker face] Perhaps something occurred during transport, Commander.

Commander William T. Riker: For an android with no feelings... he sure managed to evoke them in others.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Darmok (#5.2)" (1991)
Lt. Commander Data: Their ability to abstract is highly unusual. They seem to communicate through narrative imagery, a reference to the individuals and places which appear in their mytho-historical accounts.
Counselor Deanna Troi: It's as if I were to say to you... "Juliet on her balcony".
Doctor Beverly Crusher: An image of romance.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Exactly. Imagery is everything to the Tamarians. It embodies their emotional states, their very thought processes. It's how they communicate, and it's how they think.
Commander William T. Riker: If we know how they think, shouldn't we be able to get something across to them?
Lt. Commander Data: No, sir. The situation is analogous to understanding the grammar of a language, but none of the vocabulary.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: If I didn't know who Juliet was or what she was doing on that balcony, the image alone wouldn't have any meaning.
Counselor Deanna Troi: That's correct. For instance, we know that Darmok was a great hero, a hunter, and that Tanagra was an island. But that's it. Without the details, there's no understanding.

Commander William T. Riker: New friends, Captain?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I can't say, Number One. But at least they're not new enemies.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Where No One Has Gone Before (#1.5)" (1987)
Commander William T. Riker: And you have this ability, to travel?
The Traveler: Yes.
Commander William T. Riker: And others of your kind have the same ability?
The Traveler: Oh, yes.
Commander William T. Riker: Then why, in all of our history, is there no record of you or someone like you ever having visited us?
The Traveler: What wonderful arrogance! There is no record because we have not visited you before.
Commander William T. Riker: Why not?
The Traveler: Well, because, up until now - if-if you'll forgive this - you've been... uninteresting.

Kosinski: I don't think you understand: this has already been approved by Starfleet Command.
Commander William T. Riker: But it hasn't been approved by the chief engineer. Or by me.
Kosinski: I didn't know that was necessary.
Commander William T. Riker: Now you do.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: First Contact (#4.15)" (1991)
Commander William T. Riker: It's far more likely that I am a weather balloon than an alien.

Lanel: Will I ever see you again?
Commander William T. Riker: [posing as a Malcorian pretending to be an alien] I'll call you the next time I pass through your star system.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Symbiosis (#1.21)" (1988)
Lieutenant Tasha Yar: [on the Ornaran's and Brekkian's natural defensive powers] A natural electrical charge?
Commander William T. Riker: Formidable.
Lieutenant Tasha Yar: Yes. And a difficult weapon to confiscate.

[last lines]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Mr. La Forge, take us out of orbit.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Destination, sir?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I don't care. Let's just get some distance between us and this system.
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Aye, sir. Course 9-7-0 Mark 3-1-8, speed... warp 3.
Commander William T. Riker: Where will that take us, Mr. La Forge?
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: The Opperline system.
Commander William T. Riker: An interesting choice. Why?
Lieutenant Geordi La Forge: Curiosity. We've never been there.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Engage.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Preemptive Strike (#7.24)" (1994)
[Ro has managed to steal Enterprise's medical supplies, with 'announcement']
Commander William T. Riker: Now we know what they mean by 'advanced' tactical training.

[Ro has turned against Starfleet to join the Maquis]
Ro Laren: Could you tell Captain Picard something for me?
Commander William T. Riker: Of course, what is it?
Ro Laren: Tell him I'm sorry.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Schizoid Man (#2.6)" (1989)
Commander William T. Riker: You're not turning into a philosopher, are you, Mr. Data?
Data-Graves: I am many things - scholar, artist, philosopher... lover, genius...

[last lines]
Wesley Crusher: And you don't remember anything?
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Not a thing.
Wesley Crusher: "To know him is to love him is to know him"?
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Perhaps it is best that I do not remember. I trust I did nothing... unbecoming to a Starfleet officer?
Commander William T. Riker: Does wrestling with a Klingon targ ring a bell?
Capt. Picard: Mr. Crusher, take us out of orbit.
Wesley Crusher: Aye, sir.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Did I win?


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Survivors (#3.3)" (1989)
Commander William T. Riker: [of the warship at its second appearance] Is it my imagination or does it look a lot meaner this time?

Commander William T. Riker: Will he return to the planet?
Capt. Picard: If he is the creature of conscience I believe him to be, he has someone to help first.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: A Fistful of Datas (#6.8)" (1992)
[several computer systems have been corrupted with Data's personal database]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: When can you correct the problem?
Lt. Commander Data: We are currently attempting to isolate the corrupted circuit pathways. I reckon the process should take less than two hours.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: What did you say?
Lt. Commander Data: I said the process should take less than two hours.
Commander William T. Riker: No, you just said 'I reckon'.
Lt. Commander Data: According to my memory logs, I did not use those words. Y'all must be mistaken.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: There - Data, you did it again.
Lt. Commander Data: [southern accent] Did wha-t?

Commander William T. Riker: Mr. Data.
Lt. Commander Data: [southern accent] Howdy, Commander.
Commander William T. Riker: Geordi, what have you found?
Lt. Commander Data: [southern accent] Well - we figure part of my memory structure...
Lt. Commander Data: [normal voice] ... was replaced with information from the computer's recreational database.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: Specifically, the files relating to the American 19th century West.
Commander William T. Riker: That would explain the accent.
Lt. Commander Data: [southern accent] You got it, partner.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Time's Arrow: Part 2 (#6.1)" (1992)
Commander William T. Riker: I just want you to know that I have the utmost respect for the law.
[punches policeman in the face]

Samuel Clemens: Where are we? And when?
Commander William T. Riker: This is the 24th century, we're on Devidia II, and you're not supposed to be here.
Samuel Clemens: Well, it seems to me I have as much right to be in your time as you had to be in mine. I wanted to see how you've conducted my future affairs.
Counselor Deanna Troi: Your future affairs?
Samuel Clemens: The affairs of mankind.
Commander William T. Riker: But the disappearance of Mark Twain, one of the most noted literary figures of the 19th century...
Samuel Clemens: Thank you.
Commander William T. Riker: That's not supposed to happen.
Samuel Clemens: I only took advantage of an irresistible opportunity, as any good writer would.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Host (#4.23)" (1991)
Governor Leka Trion: Listening is a skill which seems to have evaporated with the heat of argument.
Riker Odan: Speak softly, Governor. Those who cannot hear an angry shout may strain to hear a whisper.

Riker Odan: They're reasonable people. They're just trapped in their own anger.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Liaisons (#7.2)" (1993)
[Worf is getting ready for a diplomatic reception]
Lieutenant Worf: I do not see why it is necessary to wear these... ridiculous uniforms.
Commander William T. Riker: Protocol.
Lieutenant Worf: They look like dresses.
Commander William T. Riker: That is an incredibly outmoded and sexist attitude! I'm surprised at you. - Besides, you look good in a dress.

Counselor Deanna Troi: [about Ambassador Loquel] He's obsessed with food - especially chocolate.
Commander William T. Riker: You must be in heaven!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Chain of Command: Part 2 (#6.11)" (1992)
Captain Edward Jellico: Let's drop the ranks for a moment. I don't like you. I think you're insubordinate, arrogant, willful, and I don't think you're a particularly good first officer. But you are also the best pilot on the ship.
Commander William T. Riker: Well... Now that the ranks are dropped, Captain, I don't like you either. *You* are arrogant, and closed-minded. You need to control everything and everyone. You don't provide an atmosphere of trust, and you don't inspire these people to go out of their way for you. You've got everybody wound up so tight, there's no joy in anything. I don't think you're a particularly good captain.

[Riker has barely avoided a Cardassian warship in the nebula]
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: Do I wanna know how close that was?
Commander William T. Riker: No. Get ready to deploy the mines.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Clues (#4.14)" (1991)
Commander William T. Riker: [after the Enterprise has allegedly passed through a wormhole] We're lucky we didn't end up halfway across the galaxy into the middle of next week.

Commander William T. Riker: And here we are.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Here we are *again*.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Allegiance (#3.18)" (1990)
Commander William T. Riker: What is our mission?
False Captain Picard: I'm under no obligation to tell you that.
Commander William T. Riker: If you don't, you force me to take command of this vessel.
False Captain Picard: On what grounds?
Commander William T. Riker: You are endangering this ship for no reason.
False Captain Picard: No reason *you're* aware of.
Commander William T. Riker: That's not good enough. Your behavior has been erratic.
False Captain Picard: Erratic enough to justify mutiny? Do you honestly believe you have sufficient evidence to convince a board of inquiry?
Commander William T. Riker: No, I don't. But I can't let you risk the lives of this crew.

[Picard has returned to the Enterprise and his double been unmasked]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: The replica was convincing?
Commander William T. Riker: Very convincing, but... not perfect.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Not perfect in what way?
Commander William T. Riker: Well, sir - I find it hard to believe that you're that good a singer.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Singer?
[Riker smirks]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I look forward to reading your report, Commander - at least, I think I do.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Evolution (#3.1)" (1989)
[Worf has mistakenly detected a Borg ship]
Lt. Cmdr. Data: It is conceivable that he was viewing a synthetically generated image, sir.
Commander William T. Riker: Then our computer was daydreaming?

[the ship's malfunctions have been caused by nanites]
Commander William T. Riker: Why would they attack us?
Dr. Paul Stubbs: Why does a mosquito bite your ear? And who cares? The answer is simple: call an exterminator!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Power Play (#5.15)" (1992)
[Picard has offered himself as a hostage in exchange for the injured in Ten Forward]
Commander William T. Riker: Sir, putting you down there only strengthens their position.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Number One, so long as they're on board this ship, I'm a hostage no matter where I am. We all are.

Commander William T. Riker: Lunch time, Miles!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Skin of Evil (#1.22)" (1988)
Capt. Picard: What is it, Number One? What are you seeing?
Commander William T. Riker: Trouble.

Commander William T. Riker: [Deanna is in a downed shuttlecraft but Armus is blocking the away team's path to her] She needs our help!
Voice of Armus: So what?


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Reunion (#4.7)" (1990)
Commander William T. Riker: It's considered an honorable way for a Klingon to die - a suicide that takes an enemy with it.

K'Ehleyr: The Klingon Empire is at a critical juncture. We may be facing civil war.
Commander William T. Riker: War over what?
K'Ehleyr: The usual excuses: tradition, duty, honor...
Lt. Commander Data: The word "excuses" implies alternative reasons for a conflict.
K'Ehleyr: I won't bore you with the intricacies of Klingon politics. Suffice it to say, two factions are trying to seize power.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Naked Now (#1.2)" (1987)
Capt. Picard: Take us...
Commander William T. Riker: Are you all right, sir?
Capt. Picard: Worf - you do know what to do. Take us, er...
Commander William T. Riker: Take us out of here!
Capt. Picard: Right.

[Wesley has saved Enterprise from destruction with a repulsor beam]
Commander William T. Riker: It's only fair to mention Wesley in a log entry, sir.
Capt. Picard: Fair's fair. And let's credit his science teacher, too.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Code of Honor (#1.3)" (1987)
[Riker has reluctantly agreed to let the Captain visit the Ligonians on their planet]
Commander William T. Riker: But I warn you. If you get hurt, I'll put you on report, Captain.

[Lutan has abducted Lieutenant Yar and taken her down to Ligon]
Lt. Commander Data: What Lutan did is similar to what certain American Indians once did called 'counting coup'. That is from an obscure language known as French. Counting coup...
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Mr. Data. The French language, for centuries on Earth, represented civilization.
Lt. Commander Data: Indeed? But surely, sir...
Commander William T. Riker: [sotto voce] I suggest you drop it, Mr. Data.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Attached (#7.8)" (1993)
Commander William T. Riker: Now - the matter of our missing officers.
Lorin: They're still charged with spying, Commander. I have heard nothing here which would alter that.
Commander William T. Riker: Then maybe you should consider this: if anything happens to them, Starfleet is going to want a full investigation. Which means more starships will be coming to Kesprytt, and those ships are going to want answers, which puts your country under a very large and very uncomfortable microscope. Remember how unhappy you were when we contacted just one of your people without authorization? Well, just think what it'd be like: ten starships asking questions, contacting hundreds of your people, massive sensor sweeps. They may even start sending down away teams, all because *you* wouldn't help me find my missing officers.

[Riker tells Mauric and Lorin that Kes's application for Federation membership will be denied]
Mauric: We still plan to apply for membership, Commander! We will go directly to the Federation Council, they will listen to us!
Commander William T. Riker: They will also listen to the reports of the Captain of the Enterprise and his First Officer! And I can tell you right now the First Officer's report will go something like this: "Kesprytt, a deeply troubled world with social, political, and military problems they have yet to resolve. The Kes, while a friendly and democratic people, are driven by suspicion, deviousness, and paranoia. It is the opinion of this officer they are not ready for membership."


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Journey's End (#7.20)" (1994)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Anthwara believes that I am responsible for the crimes of one of my ancestors against his people.
Commander William T. Riker: Do you believe that?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: No, of course not. I respect his belief; but I do not see how it can have any bearing on this mission. But even so, I can't help wondering... if a... dark chapter in my family's history is about to be repeated.

[Picard has arranged for snacks for Admiral Nechayev]
Commander William T. Riker: Earl Grey tea, watercress sandwiches... and Bularian canapés? Are you up for promotion?


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Hollow Pursuits (#3.21)" (1990)
[Riker, Troi and La Forge are looking for Barclay in his holo-fantasy]
Commander William T. Riker: You want us to search through all this to find him?
Counselor Deanna Troi: It could provide us with valuable information about what's troubling him. You know, there's nothing wrong with a healthy fantasy life, as long as you don't let it take over.
Commander William T. Riker: You call this healthy?
Counselor Deanna Troi: You're taking it so seriously. It's not without its element of humor.
[they come across another, Troi look-alike character]
Holo-Troi: I am the Goddess of Empathy. Cast off your inhibitions and embrace love, truth, joy...
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: Oh - my - God.
Holo-Troi: Discard your façades, and reveal your true being to me.
Counselor Deanna Troi: [indignantly] Computer, discontinue...
Commander William T. Riker: Computer, belay that order!
Commander William T. Riker: [to Troi] We want to get more insight into what's been troubling this poor man, remember?
Commander William T. Riker: [to La Forge] Quite a healthy fantasy life - wouldn't you say?
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: [agreeing] Mm.

Holo-Data: Your sword, sir.
Commander William T. Riker: I don't have a sword.
Holo-La Forge: How do you expect to fight without your sword, sir?
Commander William T. Riker: I don't expect to fight.
Holo-Picard: Ha! Do I detect a streak of yellow along the good fellow's back?
[the three "musketeers" roar with laughter]


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Cost of Living (#5.20)" (1992)
Counselor Troi: [to Alexander] One day, you're going to be glad your father cared enough about you to insist on rules. It may be hard to imagine right now, but eventually, most children come to appreciate their parents.
[Worf and Alexander leave]
Commander William T. Riker: [over intercom] Riker to Counselor Troi - your mother's just come aboard.
Counselor Troi: [to herself] On the other hand...

Capt. Picard: I will not have that woman continuing to use this ship for her convenience simply because her daughter happens to be one of my officers.
Commander William T. Riker: Apparently, Deanna being on board is only part of the reason.
Capt. Picard: The other reason being?
Commander William T. Riker: She thinks the honor of giving away the bride... should fall on you.
Capt. Picard: [comes to a halt, considering this] Permission for an on-board wedding is granted, Number One. Nothing would please me more than to give away Mrs. Troi.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Silicon Avatar (#5.4)" (1991)
Carmen Davila: It's exciting to find a new world, but the joy comes in making it a home - building houses, having children...
Commander William T. Riker: Very interesting. I'd love to discuss this further with you. Dinner tonight?
Carmen Davila: If you wanna share camp rations in my tent, I'd be delighted.

Commander William T. Riker: Data, we've only seen the Crystalline Entity once before. How do you know these metals will protect us?
Lt. Commander Data: I am not entirely certain they will, sir.
Commander William T. Riker: I was afraid you were going to say something like that.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Hunted (#3.11)" (1990)
Commander William T. Riker: Status report, Mr. Data.
Lt. Commander Data: I am afraid the prisoner has eluded us, sir.
Capt. Picard: [incredulous] Eluded the Enterprise?

Capt. Picard: Number One - will you note in our report that if the government of Angosia survives the night, we will offer them Federation assistance in their efforts to reprogram their veterans.
Commander William T. Riker: And if the government doesn't survive?
Capt. Picard: I have a feeling they will choose to.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Unification I (#5.7)" (1991)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Sarek and Spock... Well... sometimes, fathers and sons...
Commander William T. Riker: Hm... Understood.

Counselor Deanna Troi: [about Dokachin] He's king of his particular hill, Commander. You'll have to treat him that way.
Commander William T. Riker: Counselor - this feels like a perfect job for you.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Tapestry (#6.15)" (1993)
[in an alternative timeline, Picard, a mere junior lieutenant with a rather unimpressive career, has asked to be given more responsibility]
Commander William T. Riker: If you want to get ahead, you have to take chances, stand out in a crowd, get noticed.
Lt. J.G. Jean-Luc Picard: I see.
Commander William T. Riker: Now, we don't want to lose you. You're a very good officer.
Lt. J.G. Jean-Luc Picard: Just not one who stands out.

[last lines]
Commander William T. Riker: I was just trying to imagine a hellbent-for-leather young officer insulting a Nausicaan twice his size. I wish I'd had a chance to know that Jean-Luc Picard.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, well, to tell the truth, that wasn't the first run-in that I had with a couple of surly Nausicaans.
Commander William T. Riker: Really?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, yes. During my sophomore year, I was assigned to training on Morikin VII. Well, there was a Nausicaan outpost on one of the outlying asteroids, and one day...


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: True Q (#6.6)" (1992)
Q: [on Amanda] None of us knew whether she had inherited the capacities of the Q, but recently they've begun to emerge, and, uh, as an expert in humanity, I was sent to investigate.
Commander William T. Riker: You, an expert in humanity?
Q: Not a very challenging field of study, I grant you.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Dauphin (#2.10)" (1989)
Wesley Crusher: [to Riker] What should I say? How do I act? What do I do?
Commander William T. Riker: Guinan, I need your help. Could you step over here a minute?
Guinan: Sounds simple enough.
Commander William T. Riker: [to Wesley] Now, first words out of your mouth are the most important. You may want to start with something like this.
[to Guinan]
Commander William T. Riker: You are the most beautiful woman in the galaxy...
[to Wesley]
Commander William T. Riker: But that might not work.
Guinan: Yes! Yes, it would.
Commander William T. Riker: [to Guinan] You don't know how long I've wanted to tell you that.
Guinan: But you were afraid.
Commander William T. Riker: Yes.
Guinan: Of me?
Commander William T. Riker: Of us. Of what we might become...
[Wesley tries to interrupt]
Commander William T. Riker: ... or that you might think that was a line.
Guinan: Maybe I do think it's a line.
Commander William T. Riker: Then you think I'm not sincere.
Guinan: I didn't say that. There's nothing wrong with a line. It's like a knock at the door.
Commander William T. Riker: Then you're inviting me in.
Guinan: I'm not sending you away.
Commander William T. Riker: That's more than I expected.
Guinan: Is it as much as you hoped?
Commander William T. Riker: To hope is to recognize the possibility; I had only dreams.
Guinan: Dreams can be dangerous.
Commander William T. Riker: Not these dreams. I dream of a galaxy where your eyes are the stars and the universe worships the night.
Guinan: Careful. Putting me on a pedestal so high, you may not be able to reach me.
Commander William T. Riker: Then I'll learn how to fly. You are the heart in my day and the soul in my night.
Wesley Crusher: [interrupting] I don't think this is my style.
Guinan: Shut up, kid!
[to Riker, saucily]
Guinan: Tell me more about my eyes.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Devil's Due (#4.13)" (1991)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Ensign, put up the shields until further notice.
Ardra: [posing as an ensign] Yes, sir, Captain. Whatever you say.
Commander William T. Riker: We are not impressed with your magic tricks!
Ardra: I pity you. We live in a universe of magic, which evidently you cannot see.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Descent: Part 2 (#7.1)" (1993)
Commander William T. Riker: Hugh?
Hugh: What are you doing here, Commander Riker? Hasn't the crew of the Enterprise done enough damage already?


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Offspring (#3.16)" (1990)
[Lt. Cmdr. Data walks in on Lal kissing Cmdr. Riker]
Lt. Cmdr. Data: Commander - what are your intentions toward my daughter?
Commander William T. Riker: [baffled] Your daughter?
Commander William T. Riker: [to Lal, flustered] Nice to meet you!
[storms out]


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Identity Crisis (#4.18)" (1991)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: The original Tarchannen disappearances were never solved, were they?
Lt. Cmdr. Susanna Leijten: No. We never learned what happened or why. 49 people, gone.
Commander William T. Riker: And five years later, the away team that was investigating their disappearances have started to disappear themselves.
Lt. Cmdr. Susanna Leijten: [nods] Geordi and I are the only two left.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Haven (#1.10)" (1987)
Lieutenant Tasha Yar: Jewels! Look at these jewels!
Counselor Troi: They're bonding gifts - what you would call wedding presents.
Commander William T. Riker: Who's getting married?
Counselor Troi: I am.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Night Terrors (#4.17)" (1991)
Ensign Kenny Lin: We're adrift.
Commander William T. Riker: Just like the Brattain.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Ensign Ro (#5.3)" (1991)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I understand you've been discussing alternative adversarial engagement strategy with Mr. Mot.
Commander William T. Riker: It'd be more accurate to say he was discussing them with me. He's the best barber in Starfleet. What can you do?


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Datalore (#1.12)" (1988)
[last lines]
Capt. Picard: Number One, have you ever considered whether Data is more human or less human than we want?
Commander William T. Riker: I only wish we were all as well-balanced, sir.
Capt. Picard: Agreed!


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Dark Page (#7.7)" (1993)
Counselor Deanna Troi: [about Lwaxana] I was all set for another round of arguing when all of a sudden, she just fell apart.
Commander William T. Riker: She's under a lot of stress. She's preparing the Cairn to meet with the Federation Council.
Counselor Deanna Troi: It's more than that. I'm sensing some very erratic emotions from her. Even the clothes she's wearing are unusual. They're so subdued.
Commander William T. Riker: [takes Deanna's wrist] Maybe you just need sit and talk with her for a minute.
Lwaxana Troi: Commander! Take your hands off her!
[Takes his hand off Deanna]
Commander William T. Riker: [Surprised] Mrs. Troi...
Lwaxana Troi: Don't you "Mrs. Troi" me!
Counselor Deanna Troi: Mother!
Lwaxana Troi: Why don't you leave her alone? If it weren't for you, she'd be married by now!
Counselor Deanna Troi: That's enough!
Lwaxana Troi: Now, I am warning you - stay away from my daughter!
Counselor Deanna Troi: You're coming with me.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Redemption II (#5.1)" (1991)
[Picard has managed to persuade Starfleet Command to establish a blockade against the Romulans]
Commander William T. Riker: Nicely done. I hope we know what we're doing.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: So do I, Number One.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Suddenly Human (#4.4)" (1990)
[in the attempt to get a spoonful of ice cream, Jono has accidentally splashed it across Wesley's face to everyone's amusement, except... ]
Lt. Commander Data: I fail to understand why this is amusing.
Commander William T. Riker: Access your data banks under 'Humor', subheading 'Slapstick'.
Lt. Commander Data: 'Comedy stressing farce and horseplay'. Ah. This, no doubt, is a variation on 'pie in the face'.
Commander William T. Riker: Now do you see why it's funny?
Lt. Commander Data: No, sir. But I will take your word for it. This is very amusing.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Quality of Life (#6.9)" (1992)
[Riker, Dr. Crusher, La Forge and Worf are playing poker at somewhat "higher" stakes]
Doctor Beverly Crusher: If I win, all of you shave your beards off!
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: Wait a minute, wait a minute, w... what if you lose? What are *you* gonna give up?
Doctor Beverly Crusher: I'm open for suggestions.
Commander William T. Riker: Well, I've always wanted to see you as a brunette.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Oh, I did that once when I was thirteen; I couldn't change it back fast enough.
Commander William T. Riker: Makes me even more curious!
[the men laugh avidly]


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The First Duty (#5.19)" (1992)
Commander William T. Riker: When I was at the Academy, we had a Vulcan superintendent who had memorized the personnel files of every single cadet, knew everything about them. It was like having your parents around all the time.
Capt. Picard: My superintendent was a Betazoid, full telepath. When he sent for you to his office, he didn't have to ask what you'd done.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Aquiel (#6.13)" (1993)
Commander William T. Riker: I think it would be best if you weren't so personally involved with Aquiel right now; there's a lot about her we don't know.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: And there's a lot about her that I do know. And if she's innocent I want to help her prove it.
Commander William T. Riker: I think you've let your personal feelings cloud your judgement.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: I'm not the one making judgements.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Chase (#6.20)" (1993)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [discovering an artifact in the observation lounge] Oh, my God.
Professor Galen: Then you *can* identify that object, Mr. Picard?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Professor Galen?
Commander William T. Riker: Computer, lights up!
Professor Galen: I suppose I should say *Captain* Picard.
Commander William T. Riker: The Professor contacted me from his shuttle about an hour ago. He suggested that we surprise you.
Professor Galen: To clarify, I insisted and your First Officer was good enough to accommodate me. I trust I'm not being overly presumptuous, now that my star pupil is master of the stars?


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Eye of the Beholder (#7.18)" (1994)
Lieutenant Worf: I would never want to come between you and someone you are involved with, or had ever been involved with.
Commander William T. Riker: Is there someone in particular that you're talking about?
Lieutenant Worf: No. - Is there someone in particular you would rather I not be involved with?
Commander William T. Riker: Mr. Worf, you sound like a man who's asking his friend if he can start dating his sister.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Emergence (#7.23)" (1994)
[despite having been shut down earlier, the holodeck has reactivated itself]
Lieutenant Worf: Which program is running?
Lt. Commander Data: Several different programs are running simultaneously.
Commander William T. Riker: This should be interesting.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Interface (#7.3)" (1993)
Commander William T. Riker: My mother died when I was a baby. All I have is pictures, and the stories that my father used to tell me about her. I begged him to tell those stories over and over. When I was five and I went to school, I started to tell my new friends those same stories, pretending that she was alive. Then I started believing that she was alive, that she'd just gone away, but that she was coming back. The teacher got wind of this, and she and my father had this talk with me. They told me, it was important to accept the fact that my mother was dead, and that she wasn't coming back; and all the hoping in the world... wouldn't make it so. In my mind, that was the day that my mother actually died. I cried all that night. But after that, it started feeling better.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Unnatural Selection (#2.7)" (1989)
Commander William T. Riker: [on seeing the dead crew of the USS Lantree] Looks like they had a battle with time.
Lieutenant Worf: And lost.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Chain of Command: Part 1 (#6.10)" (1992)
Commander William T. Riker: [of Captain Jellico] Well, I'll say this for him - he's sure of himself.
Counselor Deanna Troi: No, he's not.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Coming of Age (#1.18)" (1988)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: They want me to take over as Commandant Starfleet Academy.
Commander William T. Riker: Congratulations. What a wonderful choice, sir! You'll be able to shape the minds of the future leaders of Starfleet.
[pause]
Commander William T. Riker: You haven't decided what you're going to do?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Yes, I have, Number One. I've decided I'm going for a walk.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: A Matter of Time (#5.9)" (1991)
[Worf has hailed a small vessel drifting in space]
Lieutenant Worf: That's odd...
Commander William T. Riker: What's odd?
Lieutenant Worf: We've received a response, but...
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Yes, Mr. Worf?
Lieutenant Worf: They want you to move over, sir.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Reply that the Enterprise isn't going anywhere, Lieutenant.
Lieutenant Worf: Not the Enterprise, Captain. *You*.


"Family Guy: Peter's Got Woods (#4.11)" (2005)
Picard: Number One, if i whispered in your ear that Commander Worf's head looks like a fanny, would you share with me a laugh.
Riker: Yeah sure I could get in on that.
Picard: All right, here it comes.
[shouts]
Picard: COMMANDER WORF'S HEAD LOOKS LIKE A FANNY!
[Everyone Laughs]
Worf: You can all suck my ridges!
Picard: Oh get a sense of Humour, Rocky Dennis.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Elementary, Dear Data (#2.3)" (1988)
Commander William T. Riker: [to Worf, who is dressed in a 19th-century suit] You'd be a big hit in London.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: New Ground (#5.10)" (1992)
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Warp without warp drive.
Commander William T. Riker: They're gonna put you out of a job, Geordi.
Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: I hope so, Commander.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Big Goodbye (#1.11)" (1988)
Commander William T. Riker: So - have a nice vacation?
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: It was a nice place to visit, Number One, but... I wouldn't want to die there.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Yesterday's Enterprise (#3.15)" (1990)
Natasha Yar: [on the ship coming through the anomaly] Definitely Federation starship. Accessing registry...
Commander William T. Riker: Looks like they had a rough ride.
Natasha Yar: "NCC 1701 - C... USS - Enterprise"...


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: In Theory (#4.25)" (1991)
Commander William T. Riker: Data, when it really works between two people, it's not like anything you've ever experienced. The rewards are far greater than simple friendship.
Lt. Cmdr. Data: How far, sir?
Commander William T. Riker: That's what I'm hoping you're going to find out.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Remember Me (#4.5)" (1990)
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Sickbay is totally empty. Apparently I no longer have any staff.
Commander William T. Riker: And that surprises you, Doctor?
Doctor Beverly Crusher: Surprises me? I'll say it surprises me. There should be at least four members of my staff on duty at all times!
Lt. Commander Data: I am afraid ship's records do not concur, Doctor.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: What are you talking about?
Lt. Commander Data: You do not have a staff.
Doctor Beverly Crusher: You're telling me I'm the sole medical officer on a ship with over a thousand people on board?
Lt. Commander Data: Excuse me, Doctor, but the entire ship's complement is 230.


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: Rascals (#6.7)" (1992)
Commander William T. Riker: [explaining the Enterprise's systems to Morta in outrageous techno-gibberish] The Enterprise computer system is controlled by three primary main processor cores, cross-linked with a redundant melacortz ramistat, fourteen kiloquad interface modules. The core element is based on an FTL nanoprocessor with 25 bilateral kelilactirals, with twenty of those being slaved into the primary heisenfram terminal. Now, you do know what a bilateral kelilactiral is?
Morta: Well, of course I do, Human. I am not stupid!
Commander William T. Riker: No, of course not. This is the isopalavial interface, which controls the main firomactal drive unit - don't touch that! You'll blow up the entire firomactal drive.
Morta: Oh, what... what i... , er, wait, er, what is a-a-a... a firomactal drive? Just explain it to me.
Commander William T. Riker: That is the firomactal drive unit. It controls the ramistat core, and keeps the ontarian manifold at 40,000 KRGs. The firomactal drive is powered by...


"Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Next Phase (#5.24)" (1992)
[Data has been given charge of arranging a memorial service for Geordi and Ro. Picard and Riker enter the lounge and find balloons, cocktails, and a brass band playing a lively tune]
Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Well, this is... unusual.
Commander William T. Riker: [grinning] Yeah. I think I like it.